New to doing Bonsai

jkgarner

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After years of reading about bonsai and gathering tools... I finally purchased 3 procumbens last weekend. Then the other night, I trimmed and potted them. I did not wire them. I was not sure about it, as branches are somewhat stiff, though I am new to this, I would not be the one to judge whether they were too stiff or not. Perhaps wiring would improve their looks. I will be working on a few maple trees I picked up last weekend as well. Bot that is a different thread.


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jkgarner

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Welcome.
Procumbens is a good starting place, they are pretty tough. To start with 3 is a bit odd but it is dependent upon individualization. Best thing to do is diversify.
Please add your location in your profile so we can be of more help.
OK, I put some details out there. USDA Zone 8. Still cool, but spring is about to pop. My daffodils are coming up; the first one opened yesterday. Sap in the trees will be flowing soon.
 

Deep Sea Diver

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Welcome Aboard!

Good choice on the junipers as a kick off yours bonsai endeavours. Maples are harder, requiring more patience and time, but can be very rewarding.

Looking forward to seeing your future posts.

cheers
DSD sends
 

Shogun610

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Greetings traveler to this section of the ancient old growth forest.. as you pass through the treehouse door you’re greeted with gnomes native to these parts, they cheer and clap as you are welcomed. Warm cocoa is being cooked on the stove as pan flutes and a guitar start playing as they serenade you with the song of our people. Welcome home.
 

Carol 83

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Greetings traveler to this section of the ancient old growth forest.. as you pass through the treehouse door you’re greeted with gnomes native to these parts, they cheer and clap as you are welcomed. Warm cocoa is being cooked on the stove as pan flutes and a guitar start playing as they serenade you with the song of our people. Welcome home.
You're giving @HorseloverFat a run for his money!
 

jkgarner

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Alright, I am completely new to this, as in never done it before, never even attempted to keep one someone else grew, just umping in cold turkey, new: I now have several small Juniper bonsai trees, I could use advice on watering, schedules, amounts, what to look for, tips tricks...
I live in the humid South-east U.S. where temperatures in the summer are in the mid to upper 90's (F) with humidity upwards of 60% (usually higher, closer to 80 or 90%) Rain fall can be severe and frequent, but we can also go a month or two with no rain. Currently they are on a shelf on my patio on the north side of my house where they receive speckled sun, shaded by adult trees.
 

ShadyStump

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Alright, I am completely new to this, as in never done it before, never even attempted to keep one someone else grew, just umping in cold turkey, new: I now have several small Juniper bonsai trees, I could use advice on watering, schedules, amounts, what to look for, tips tricks...
I live in the humid South-east U.S. where temperatures in the summer are in the mid to upper 90's (F) with humidity upwards of 60% (usually higher, closer to 80 or 90%) Rain fall can be severe and frequent, but we can also go a month or two with no rain. Currently they are on a shelf on my patio on the north side of my house where they receive speckled sun, shaded by adult trees.
Procumbens are native to the southern tip of Japan where the climate can be very similar to what you can get in Alabama, though I understand slightly more chance of snow in winter.
As a rule, junipers LOVE full sun. The sunniest place you can find will be your best bet.
As for watering, the chopstick trick is a great tool. Take a regular bamboo chopstick or skewer, and gently jab it into the soil at the center of the root mass, and leave it there. Use it as a dip stick to check the moisture level of the soil. Water thoroughly just before the stick seems dry, and not before.
Almost anything woody can become a bonsai, and The South is notorious for it's diversity of trees. Use them as inspiration and material.

Most importantly, don't quit just because one or even all of these first trees die. Dead trees are the price of admission to our sordid little club here. For every dead tree you learn 100 lessons, but only one lesson per success.
 

jkgarner

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How concerned should I be about cold temperatures (dropping below freezing) with newly potted Junipers? We are expecting temperature in the upper 20's Tuesday morning? Based on my reading, once they have adjusted to their new situation, I expect the occasional upper 20's will not hurt them.
 

ShadyStump

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What conditions were they in when you bought them?
If yours were already in a warm environment they're wide awake and won't handle the freeze. If that's the case, you should bring them in for anything below freezing.

Most conifers still need a winter dormancy period, even though they keep their foliage and don't look sleepy. The dormancy period is how they survive the cold winters.
For procumbens, this is essentially optional, but once they're asleep, they need to finish uninterrupted, and they take as much time to fall asleep as any tree.
 

Eckhoffw

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I’ll say right off, that if you have any bonsai clubs around, get involved there.

I started with a ‘intro to bonsai’ -2 session community Ed class, then joined the Minnesota bonsai society.
The amount of useful info and resources you’ll acquire will far surpass any other resources IMO.
 

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