Oklahoma Collecting trip

chappy56

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Attached are a few photos from a trip I just returned from.
A good friend, Neil Dellinger, allowed me to join him at a spot that must remain nameless back in the woods of Tulsa for some Winged Elms.

My tree, the one I'm holding, took us all of an hour and 30 minutes to free from the soil, aka ROCKS, not too bad. The biggest part of it sat on top of a large flat stone.
His tree, on the other hand engulfed, a large stone in its grasp that took us all of 3 and a half hours to set free. Yes, we're both partly insane.
Thanks Neil for the opportunity. It was a blast.
 

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mcpesq817

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Great find there - thanks for sharing. I really love the bark. Well worth the blood, sweat and tears I'm sure :D
 

chappy56

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Updated photo of the collected Winged Elm.
I think its gonna live.
 

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misfit11

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Looks great! I read somewhere that these Elms (specifically, Texas Cedar Elms, but I think this is probably the same species, correct?) will take a lot of abuse as far as root pruning/disturbance is concerned. I have a shohin size cedar elm that I repotted this spring by cutting back the roots pretty hard. It responded with strong growth.

Good luck with this tree. The trunk is very nice! Perhaps you can replace some of those heavier, lower limbs with Uros (sp?). I think these little hollows are appropriate for this type of tree and are a good solution to removing a branch, rather than waiting for scars to heal over. Harry Harrington talks about them on his site http://www.bonsai4me.com/AdvTech/ATUro.htm

It is going to be interesting seeing this tree develop. Great stock! Keep us abreast of all the changes!

Peace
 
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misfit11

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Sorry, I'm wrong (wow! who would have guessed?!). Winged Elm is Ulmus alata and the Texas Cedar Elm is Ulmus crassifolia. They are probably similar, though. I know the Cedar Elm has winged branches as well.
 

chappy56

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Alright friends, it's time to go to work on this one.
I'm lookin for input on what to do next.
Where to chop, virts, etc.
Thanks for your input.......
 

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chrisbotero

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I dont know much about elms in the south but Im really surprised you want to work on a tree only 4 months after collecting. Ive always heard that at least a year, two or even three is better to allow the tree to grow substantial roots and recover from transplant. Otherwise your adding insult to injury and will weaken or even kill the tree.
Again, elms are not up my ally but a pine in the NW wouldnt appriciate the immediate work.
 

JTGJr25

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I dont know much about elms in the south but Im really surprised you want to work on a tree only 4 months after collecting. Ive always heard that at least a year, two or even three is better to allow the tree to grow substantial roots and recover from transplant. Otherwise your adding insult to injury and will weaken or even kill the tree.
Again, elms are not up my ally but a pine in the NW wouldnt appriciate the immediate work.

I second this. Unless winged elms are some super species I wouldn't even touch this tree for at least a year.

Tom
 

rockm

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Elms aren't pines. They are EXTREMELY tough and adaptable. If there is that much growth on the tree, it means it is recovering nicely...

However, I'd agree that four months out of the ground is too early. It is recovering, not recovered. You still have to get it through the winter. Chopping it, hard pruning it, etc. will not be helpful right now. Hard chops to trunks and branches could mean extensive die back over the winter to pruned areas.

Also, planning chops and stuff at this point is not really helpful. The tree isn't really stable. Your plans could be foiled if a section of trunk up and dies off.

Leave it alone for a year, or two...This will give you time to think about direction and the tree time to firmly establish what it wants to grow and what it wants to get rid of...
 
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