pond baskets

cubbie

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I did a search, but need some more info on pond baskets.

Are there certain species that do better in them? I live in FL, would they need to be watered more often? (mostly tropicals).

Has anyone put a bald cypress in one and then put it in a bucket of water????

any info appreciated!!!!
 

irene_b

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I did a search, but need some more info on pond baskets.

Are there certain species that do better in them? I live in FL, would they need to be watered more often? (mostly tropicals).

Has anyone put a bald cypress in one and then put it in a bucket of water????

any info appreciated!!!!


I use pond baskets for everthing!
Never tried it with a baldy tho.
Mom
 

Martin Sweeney

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Cubbie,

Will Heath had a very informative article published in the ABS Journal concerning training pots and pond baskets. Worth reading if you haven't done so already. He had a good tip about hardwiring legs to the bottom of your pond baskets to help with drainage and ease of movement. Been meaning to compliment him on that.....

I just started using them this year.

Plants that like good drainage would be good candidates for pond baskets. Plants that like moist soil might require more watering. Depends on your local conditions, but I would plan to have to deal with that issue and be on the look out for watering needs on any plants you pot into baskets.

Bald Cypress in pond basket in water might take some experimentation on your part. There is much debate on bald cypress in water. I grow few bald cypress, they have done very well for me in water, but the growth is vigorous to the point of being rank and basically useless for bonsai, except to thicken trunks. I am not sure if the air pruning benefits of the pond basket would work if the basket is kept submerged. I think it would be worth the effort to try one and see.

Hope that helps.
Regards,
Martin
 
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With most trees we want to accelerate drainage and that's why we use the pond baskets. I think bald cypress might work better without.
 

BONSAI_OUTLAW

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I have had trouble keeping my baldies moist in Pond baskets...They just dried out too fast for me in 100% oildry in the baskets.
 

Rick Moquin

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I have had trouble keeping my baldies moist in Pond baskets...They just dried out too fast for me in 100% oildry in the baskets.
You might want to try throwing in somed chopped sphagnum moss for your baldies, at perhaps 20% for starters. Inorganic soils do have their draw backs, especially those who like water. I recently received a willow from a felklow enthusiast, who told me to keep the pot (regular nursery) in a dish of water. Man that thing drinks.
 

Rick Moquin

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wrt pond baskets, I know use them exclusively, including the "Vance" pond baskets as I felt my grow box remained too moist. The latter was even taken place in a fast draning soil with only 10-12% organic material (bark).
 
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Cubbie,

Will Heath had a very informative article published in the ABS Journal concerning training pots and pond baskets. Worth reading if you haven't done so already. He had a good tip about hardwiring legs to the bottom of your pond baskets to help with drainage and ease of movement. Been meaning to compliment him on that.....
Thank you.

A internet version of that article can be seen here.

Although drainage is a asset with pond baskets, the main reason I use them is for the fantastic root development. Roots will not circle around in screen sided planters like they do in any other form of pot. Instead when the roots reach the sides, the tips die, cause some formation back on the main root, hence creating lots of the fine feeder roots we desired for moving a tree into a bonsai pot.



Will
 

grog

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I think it's worth re-emphasizing the point Martin noted Will making in his article about wiring legs to the bottom of the pond baskets. I read the article but apparently forgot that part and had a bit of a mishap with some collected elms growing roots through the bottom and into the ground. They grew like crazy but it defeated the point of the pond basket.
 
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grog,

Yes, that can be a problem if you set the baskets on the ground, roots will quickly grow through the screen.Even if one sets the basket on a bench, without legs there is little air circulation and roots that reach the bottom will bend and grow in another direction instead of dying back.

I use 1" pieces cut from a 1x6 piece of board for this purpose. I cut two pieces of wire about 5" long and push them over the block and into the underside of the basket. I then twist the ends together inside. One block on each side of the basket works just fine. This allows for drainage, prevents grow through of roots, and allows air to circulate.


Will
 
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It's amazing how long these things last, too! You can use them again and again without fear that they will deteriorate in the sun.
 
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True, I even have a couple that cracked down the side and I stitched them together with fine detail wire....still going strong!



Will
 

grog

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They do not hold up so well when one of your grandpa's cows steps on them. Who woulda thunk it?:D
 
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I would suggest keeping the cows off the benches, but I am sure they like it up there. ;)



Will
 
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There are three types of pond baskets I have seen out there.

1) The kind with a molded "U" shaped bottom which creates two "legs" and are usually green. These are sold in pond stores and are expensive.

2) the square type that I use, no legs, same on all sides and black. These are inexpensive and can be found at walmart, etc. They also come in various sizes, when you find the smaller, shohin sized or the extra large sizes, stock up, they can be hard to find at good prices.

3) All other shapes, round, oval, etc...expensive usually.



Will
 

Graydon

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My issue with pond baskets is the extra (and unwanted) depth. Not really nuts about having to add extra soil or plant the tree deep in the basket. I prefer good plastic colanders. Better width to depth ratio and less soil needed.
 

paddles

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I started using colanders last year and found them fantastic, the difference in the root growth and formation was/is amazing. I found that colanders are more readily available (at $2- Au each) much cheeper than pond baskets (20- plus) even if they only last a couple of years, it's still worth it in my mind. keeping them moist in our dry climate is a challenge, but not impossible.
 
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Wow, I can find pond baskets 11" x 11" for $1.58 and the 9x9's for under a buck at times. At the dollar store I see colanders for a buck or less all the time, but they are always the yellow color. I guess it is just a matter of preference, I find pond baskets more visually appealing. But colanders work just as well....so why not?


Will
 
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