Potting Soild For JWP

junmilo

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Hi all

I was curious the type of soil or mediums the Japanese white pine would need for repotting? I recently got a Huge JWP tree from our local nursery through a special order..it's flowering and growing new needles in it's container right now, the weather is getting warmer, so i want to pot it into a bigger pot...

I understand that they don't like too much water..and the water should escape the soil right after...

Do you guys think just 50% sand/gravel + 10% cat litter + 40% Triple Mix Soil(Blend of mineral topsoil, compost and aged bark fines) is good?

Also, i will add some Mycorrhiza into the soil mix to help the root absorb nurtients.

Thank you

J
 

Bob O

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It would help to know what area you live in, but from your description of the current movement of the tree, it is to late to repot it this year.

The good news is this gives you plenty of time to research the available soil components in your area. (Cat Litter is not good.) Crushed lava, pumice, turface, etc. are much better options.

If there is a club in your area, meet with them, show them your tree, you will get plenty of help.

Do a search on this site for soil discussions.

Hope this helps,

Bob O
 

junmilo

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It would help to know what area you live in, but from your description of the current movement of the tree, it is to late to repot it this year.

The good news is this gives you plenty of time to research the available soil components in your area. (Cat Litter is not good.) Crushed lava, pumice, turface, etc. are much better options.

If there is a club in your area, meet with them, show them your tree, you will get plenty of help.

Do a search on this site for soil discussions.

Hope this helps,

Bob O
Hi Thank you for your help. I live in Southern Ontario, Canada..the evening is still on the chill side..sometimes there are freezes...i bring in the tree into our living room when the evening arives and outside in the morning.

So for repotting a huge tree in a pot is too late in the season?...will it die? cuz it comes in a rootball type of container..don't think there's much soil in the pot..

Thank You

J
 

Dav4

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If the buds/candles are just swelling, you can still re-pot/do meaninful rootwork. If needles are pushing out from the candles, you are too late for this season. Also, you need to work on the components of your soil. The kitty litter and the triple soil mix you describe would almost definately kill the tree. There are many threads on soil here, so spend some time searching and reading up on what might work for you. Having lived in southern New England (similar to your climate), I would reccommend a 100% inorganic mix for a conifer such as the JWP. The goal for your soil is to quickly drain water yet be moisture retentive. Products like baked clay (Turface), crushed quartz sand, crushed granite, expanded shale, haydite, lava, and pumice have all been successfully used as part of a soil mix. Hopefully some of these will be available locally. Good luck,

Dave
 

junmilo

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If the buds/candles are just swelling, you can still re-pot/do meaninful rootwork. If needles are pushing out from the candles, you are too late for this season. Also, you need to work on the components of your soil. The kitty litter and the triple soil mix you describe would almost definately kill the tree. There are many threads on soil here, so spend some time searching and reading up on what might work for you. Having lived in southern New England (similar to your climate), I would reccommend a 100% inorganic mix for a conifer such as the JWP. The goal for your soil is to quickly drain water yet be moisture retentive. Products like baked clay (Turface), crushed quartz sand, crushed granite, expanded shale, haydite, lava, and pumice have all been successfully used as part of a soil mix. Hopefully some of these will be available locally. Good luck,

Dave
Hi Dave

Thank you for answering my questions as well. So if it's too late? I see the needles trying to push out but not fully out yet..and i see a lot of pink type flowers under those needles trying to push out..on the candles...so i guess it is too late for repot....If i leave it in the original container..will it survive? or will it die?

Thank You

J
 

Dav4

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If the tree is not rootbound, it will be fine for another year. If you can, planting it in the ground is a good solution for this year and will require much less attention then a potted tree. Then, you can take your time and have everything you need for next spring's work, namely the right soil mix, and the knowlege and understanding of what actually is involved with rootwork and re-potting. If you can, post some pictures of your new tree.
 

junmilo

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If the tree is not rootbound, it will be fine for another year. If you can, planting it in the ground is a good solution for this year and will require much less attention then a potted tree. Then, you can take your time and have everything you need for next spring's work, namely the right soil mix, and the knowlege and understanding of what actually is involved with rootwork and re-potting. If you can, post some pictures of your new tree.
I will take photo today and post it...
 
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I might also point out that it is a tree that lives outside. You don't do it any favors by bringing it in every night. In fact you might do it damage by not letting the frost and cold get to it and kill any critters that may have designs on it.
 

tanlu

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I might also point out that it is a tree that lives outside. You don't do it any favors by bringing it in every night. In fact you might do it damage by not letting the frost and cold get to it and kill any critters that may have designs on it.
Mac is right. JWP are very cold hardy trees. I have 5 JWP, non-grafted, and I left them outside mulched under some trees all winter, and they responded with very healthy vigorous growth. They need deep cold dormancy and a relatively cool environment like yours to thrive. Note: Their native climate is the high altitude mountain ridges of Central Japan. What I noticed is that they thrive when you just leave them alone. Just water when soil feels dry, and fertilize accordingly.

Since you seem to be new at this, I also advise agains repotting it or doing any root work until next spring. I'm sure your tree can wait until next spring to be repotted. If you do that, you will invigorate it and have all year for it to establish itself in it's new pot. Much better for the long term health of the tree.

T
 

junmilo

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Mac is right. JWP are very cold hardy trees. I have 5 JWP, non-grafted, and I left them outside mulched under some trees all winter, and they responded with very healthy vigorous growth. They need deep cold dormancy and a relatively cool environment like yours to thrive. Note: Their native climate is the high altitude mountain ridges of Central Japan. What I noticed is that they thrive when you just leave them alone. Just water when soil feels dry, and fertilize accordingly.

Since you seem to be new at this, I also advise agains repotting it or doing any root work until next spring. I'm sure your tree can wait until next spring to be repotted. If you do that, you will invigorate it and have all year for it to establish itself in it's new pot. Much better for the long term health of the tree.

T
Hi T

Thank you for your help. So from what i understand...i know that my tree doesn't have any soil in its original pot...so it's basically full of roots tangled together....I should just leave it outside, during winter as well? and repot in the spring right? I don't want the roots to freeze during Canadian Weather..

Thank You

J
 

tanlu

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Hi T

Thank you for your help. So from what i understand...i know that my tree doesn't have any soil in its original pot...so it's basically full of roots tangled together....I should just leave it outside, during winter as well? and repot in the spring right? I don't want the roots to freeze during Canadian Weather..

Thank You

J
Yes, don't do anything to the roots. It's too late in the season, unless you can provide a photo that shows buds just starting to swell. That is the only time you repot. Look, if your tree is healthy now, it should be fine to wait until next year to repot. You'll just have to water it more this summer so the root mass doesn't dry out.

The most important thing to remember is: the tree must experience below 4C temps for at least 3 months for it to go into deep dormancy. The cold isn't what kills the tree, it's the drying winds and sun that you need to watch out for. The tree must be left in a place that shields it from wind and direct sunlight. You're right, root protection is absolutely necessary. An unheated garage would be ideal. Since I don't have that I just left my JWPs and JBP under some pine trees outside and covered them up to the first branch with pine needles. The pine needles act as a good insulator, keeping the roots temp and moisture level consistent.

Is your JWP grafted? If your JWP is on it's own roots, meaning not grafted to JBP, it's roots would be more resistant to freezing temperatures.
 
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junmilo

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Yes, don't do anything to the roots. It's too late in the season, unless you can provide a photo that shows buds just starting to swell. That is the only time you repot. Look, if your tree is healthy now, it should be fine to wait until next year to repot. You'll just have to water it more this summer so the root mass doesn't dry out.

The most important thing to remember is: the tree must experience below 4C temps for at least 3 months for it to go into deep dormancy. The cold isn't what kills the tree, it's the drying winds and sun that you need to watch out for. The tree must be left in a place that shields it from wind and direct sunlight. You're right, root protection is absolutely necessary. An unheated garage would be ideal. Since I don't have that I just left my JWPs and JBP under some pine trees outside and covered them up to the first branch with pine needles. The pine needles act as a good insulator, keeping the roots temp and moisture level consistent.

Is your JWP grafted? If your JWP is on it's own roots, meaning not grafted to JBP, it's roots would be more resistant to freezing temperatures.
Hi

Thanks again, I can confirm that the buds on the candles are all popping out and the pink looking flowers are everywhere on this tree...can i still repot it?

I think the JWP is grafted...it's like close to 5feet in height

Thank You

J
 

tanlu

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I really need to see a photo to tell whether it's safe. However, if the pink female flowers are out, it's definitely too late. Will not hurt the tree to wait until next spring.

You mentioned it's a grafted variety.. which means it's roots are probably more susceptable to freezing temps. Either way you need to provide some sort of protection in winter.
 
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