Signs of tree dying

Krone

Mame
Messages
215
Reaction score
51
Location
Slovenia
USDA Zone
7b
What are the first signs of the tree dying / not doing well after it was repotted?
 
Messages
803
Reaction score
1,340
Location
Tennessee
USDA Zone
7a
Depends on several factors. I think the community could help better if you provide more info. What type of tree, how long ago was the Repot, what did you do for aftercare, was it healthy prior? Pics would go a long way into helping as well.
 

Krone

Mame
Messages
215
Reaction score
51
Location
Slovenia
USDA Zone
7b
I have repotted an Acer ginalla a week ago, the tree was healthy and it's looking fine to me.
Was asking more in generally, so i can be more careful and watchful when checking out my trees now and in the future.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

Masterpiece
Messages
2,103
Reaction score
3,004
Location
Netherlands
Foliage tends to tell a story. In conifers it's usually a story of the past. In broadleafs it's usually a story of the present.
If the foliage doesn't tell you anything, the branches probably will; they'll desiccate or get weird spots.
Then there's the roots; if there's no fresh (white, green or reddish) growth, and they're all black, the tree is either dormant or dead.
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
23,407
Reaction score
31,253
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
One more reason to Repot in Summer!

In spring, the sign, "it stops growing" can happen just because of cold.
In spring there is always the beginning of the year "growth" which can be mistaken for the opposite of decline.
In spring it can be, "coming to life", even though the life has just been removed.

In summer, there isn't this confusion, it grows or it dies. And so far, it's always grown!

Sorce
 

StoneCloud

Omono
Messages
1,314
Reaction score
1,887
Location
North Carolina
USDA Zone
7b
One more reason to Repot in Summer!

In spring, the sign, "it stops growing" can happen just because of cold.
In spring there is always the beginning of the year "growth" which can be mistaken for the opposite of decline.
In spring it can be, "coming to life", even though the life has just been removed.

In summer, there isn't this confusion, it grows or it dies. And so far, it's always grown!

Sorce
This!! It's something I'm still trying to decided on when is right. Sorce, you did it this way for all species ?
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
23,407
Reaction score
31,253
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
Sorce, you did it this way for all species ?
Not yet, but only because the D's I need to Repot haven't been healthy, and the last thing we need is fake evidence that summer repotting kills!

Really gotta do it this year but ......

Sorce
 

Krone

Mame
Messages
215
Reaction score
51
Location
Slovenia
USDA Zone
7b
How long does it usually takes with decidious trees to show any signs of dying after the repot?
 

Leo in N E Illinois

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,439
Reaction score
11,403
Location
on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
USDA Zone
5b
First signs of a tree dying? Difficult to say, before dying a tree shows stress, the tree is dying when it does not recover from stress. If the tree turns brown and black, and it is not autumn, it is dying. Give your Acer ginnala time to recover. Relax. It may look stressed, but if you keep trying to do something else with it, you will aggravate the situation, make it worse. Just give your tree "good care", sun, especially morning sun, afternoon shade, and keep a daily check on whether it needs water. And it should recover. Don't try to do anything more than give it time to recover. The danger is you will "help it to death". Just put the tree on your bench in the back yard, and leave it alone, beyond watering as needed.

I do a lot of summer repotting of conifers. Works well in my specific climate. There are a few deciduous trees I repot in summer, but only a few. Generally, deciduous are best repotted late winter, early spring. Generally. There is a HUGE climate factor that determines the feasibility of repotting in summer. I do not know the climate in Slovenia. I have a guess, but do not know. Summer repotting of deciduous trees is NOT FOR HOT SUMMER CLIMATES. Where I live, and Sorce lives, we have relatively cool summer climates. We average fewer than 10 days per year with highs over 32 C (90 F). That is considered a mild summer region. If you have a large number of days in summer over 32 C ( 90 F ) summer repotting is not as good a solution. Climate is important.

I still repot the majority of my deciduous trees in EARLY SPRING, just before buds swell, or as the buds are swelling, before buds open. Sorce and myself are in the same general climate zone. Summer repotting is not a blanket solution to repotting problems. Repotting deciduous in summer can be done, but it is an "advanced topic" in that it is not always simple or obvious what all you need to do, to get the tree through the process. Sometime you need to prune back foliage, sometimes not, sometimes it might be wise to defoliate at the time you summer repot, sometimes not. It is just too complicated a topic to tackle without extensive photos and pages and pages of typing.
 

Krone

Mame
Messages
215
Reaction score
51
Location
Slovenia
USDA Zone
7b
Thanks for all the answers. I have repotted before but it's a first tree that i really care about and the second one will follow soon.
I have (just to be sure) wrapped the pot into the insulation, soil is still wet and the upper part gets morning sun. It does look OK at the moment but i just want to have as many info as possible regarding this topic.
 

Similar threads


Top Bottom