Spring 2010 befores and afters part 1

october

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Hello all.. While sorting out my files, I cam across some before and after pics of my trees from this past Spring. Thought I would share... Feel free to post your own before and afters as well.

Just a couple of notes, some of these “after” pics are not immediately after, they may be 1-2 months after the styling. Also, I do not want it to sound like these were created in an instant.. I have been working on these for years now. These are just reworks from this last Spring. Also, all trees are works in progress and are awaiting more training and the appropriate size and style pots.

continued...
 

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jk_lewis

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For me, at least, you've overpruned all of them, and on the first few the branches and shape are entirely too symetrical and regular. They've lost their "tree-ness."

Sorry.
 

october

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Thanks catfish chapstick... I have been working on themon average, for the last 3-7 years or so.

Hello jkl.. I respectfully disagree with you... As you can see... All the trees were overgrown. Last season, I did not do hardly anywork.. Most of them reverted back to bushes, literally, they needed much pruning and due to certain changes that I thought would improve the designs of the trees, much of my collection was reworked (different views, hard pruning, repotting etc..)

As far as the first too being too symetrical, for these, I have chosen to go for a very symetrical look for these particular trees.. I approach each tree on it's own. If I think perfect is best for the individual tree, then that is what I go with.. Also, every tree that was hard pruned last Spring has bushed out again and flourished and is in top health. Health is the most important aspect to me regarding my trees. It is what allows me to change and evolve the tree, no matter how radical it is, and the trees still do well.

I do respect your opinion and in other situations, you would not prune this much. Like I said, it depends on the health and vision you have for the tree...

Rob
 

DaveV

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You are right on the money October, nice job!
 

Dwight

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I like the shimp a lot. All look nice. How did they fare this summer ?
 

satsuki

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Nice work,
I especially like the literati in part 2 of your post.



Satsuki
 

bonsaiTOM

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I especially like that literati also - though I might have gone a little farther to 'lighten' the top a bit more. But I like that tree. NICE.
 

good_ol_jr77

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Nice work. As for the over-pruning comments I just want it to be clear to anyone who may lack the experience that every bonsai tree looks over-pruned when it has been styled. The styling takes it back to its bare bones in order to establish branch shape. The foliage then grows, and with proper pinching, in a matter of a season or two the tree takes its 'finished' shape. I've never pruned a bonsai into form, they have always grown into form.
 

october

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Thank you DaveV, I appreciate the compliment and the confidence.

Hello Dwight.. All faired excellent. All grew back vigorously again and some, even needed another light pruning. The first tree, the shimp, was pruned pretty heavy for a shimp. The reason being that the trees growth managed to get away from me over the last 2 years. I hesitated before I pruned it as much as I did.. The branches had elongated not only on the sides, but towards the viewer as well. So much so that the trunk looked far and deep in the interior of the tree. I cut those branches back to some newer buds and growth. Not something I would normally do on a juniper, but more like something that you would do on an elm or something. Anyway, the tree grew slowly, throughout the summer, I am thinking that next summer, the tree will start growing like crazy. Next year, the tree will be repotted. I tought it would be too stressful to do that much pruning and a repot in one seaon. If I had to decide it again, I still would have pruned it, but I may have waited a bit for those buds to become stronger. However, it seemingly is all working out anyway.

Thank you satsuki.. I am quite fond of that tree also. It is different than many literati you see.

Thanks BonsaiTOM. It is actually more sparce in person that it looks.. Also, that is after it grew out for a month or so.. The initial pruning was more sparce than what you are seeing in that pic. So, yes, I agree with your opinion, because it was lighter in foliage before it grew back.

Hello good_ol_jr77.. You comment is right on the money. With these particular trees.. They were reworked. Although they have been in training for 3-7 years, many were completely restyled (different angles, heavy pruning etc...) So, in a sense, it was like starting over again with "bare bones".

Ironically enough, about 7-8 years or so ago. I remember seeing the work of the masters visiting the nursery. I remember seeing the trees that they worked on whether in person or in pics. Almost all were "bare bones"..completely stripped. I remember thinkin how I thought that it seemd excessive and I wondered how the tree could even cope with this.. Now 8 or so years later, I completely understand. I see that it is almost a necessity to do this. Like you said, the tree will then grow into a bonsai after it is completely structured.

Rob
 
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