Springtime Feeding tips

emk

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As maples have set out their first flush of leaves, yews and spruces are pushing out their bright new needles, and pines are producing their candles, I think it's safe to say: Springtime has finally arrived in Ohio! The question I have at the moment is this:

Other than balanced/high-nitrogen fertilizer, is there anything special you feed your trees in the springtime to give them a good start on the growing season?
 

PaulH

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I've started using kelp both in granulated and liquid form for its cyotkinen content, a plant hormone that stimulates budding. I also use Kellogs organic fertilizer because of its live mycorhyxzae content. I rotate these on a week;y basis with Miracle Gro and a solution of fish emulsion and humate.
Paul
 
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Usually nitrogen is the limiting factor, so the NPK of your fert is not very important, what matters is the total quantity of nitrogen you deliver.
 

cquinn

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I've started using kelp both in granulated and liquid form for its cyotkinen content, a plant hormone that stimulates budding. I also use Kellogs organic fertilizer because of its live mycorhyxzae content. I rotate these on a week;y basis with Miracle Gro and a solution of fish emulsion and humate.
Paul

This sounds terrific. Be careful with the salts in the Miracle grow though. I leave organo grow on the surface throughout the growing season, and I give them a shot of fish emulsion every two weeks in the Spring (1st and 15th).
 

pauldogx

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Remember--organics dont work until the soil gets a abit warmer--so early spring I use chemical feed.
 

PaulH

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Can someone explain for me the science behind the claim (myth) that fertilizers such as Miracle gro cause salts (which by nature are soluble) to accumulate in bonsai soil which is very freely draining and frequently watered?
As I seem to recall from my long ago Cal Aggie education fertilizer salt toxicity is mainly a problem in poorly drained hardpan type soils. With good water and drainage salts should leach away.
Paul
 

cquinn

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Can someone explain for me the science behind the claim (myth) that fertilizers such as Miracle gro cause salts (which by nature are soluble) to accumulate in bonsai soil which is very freely draining and frequently watered?
As I seem to recall from my long ago Cal Aggie education fertilizer salt toxicity is mainly a problem in poorly drained hardpan type soils. With good water and drainage salts should leach away.
Paul

Some "free draining" componets of soil also hold water (Calcined Clay, Lava, etc.) thus they also hold and trap salts.
 

meushi

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Can someone explain for me the science behind the claim (myth) that fertilizers such as Miracle gro cause salts (which by nature are soluble) to accumulate in bonsai soil which is very freely draining and frequently watered?

It is a bit like the root burn myth ;) FWIW, the late Michel Sacal in France tested salt buildup and root burn on a trident and had to feed it 70x the recommended dilution to have a problem with modern substrates. Until the problematic solution was reached, the tree was thriving.
 

pauldogx

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It is a bit like the root burn myth ;) FWIW, the late Michel Sacal in France tested salt buildup and root burn on a trident and had to feed it 70x the recommended dilution to have a problem with modern substrates. Until the problematic solution was reached, the tree was thriving.

:D:D:D Amen.
 

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