The 2022 Yamadori/Collecting Thread

mattspiniken

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Almost Every time the field soil has broken away considerably, I lose the tree
Thanks for the info, sounds similar to what I am doing. I notice the same issue, when the field soil falls away I lose the tree as well.

I have always blamed that on the fact that I was not able to get enough roots around the base of the tree. When I do lose a tree it is almost always because I was wrong about how many roots the tree has close to the trunk. I carefully excavate the tree out thinking I have plenty of roots and then realize later that the roots that I thought belong to the tree are from a different tree and my trees roots are actually away from the trunk.
 

August44

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I know this a is a pretty general question, but if collecting conifers like Ponderosa, Larch, Lodgepole, spruce, Subalpine firs, and Mt Hemlocks, how far away from the base/trunk would you start digging down to be safe realizing that the diameter might be reduced when you get it on the table back home and have more of an idea of the root situation? I realize that the soil conditions where you dig would have a lot to do with it too.
 

andrewiles

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Thanks for the info, sounds similar to what I am doing. I notice the same issue, when the field soil falls away I lose the tree as well.

I have always blamed that on the fact that I was not able to get enough roots around the base of the tree. When I do lose a tree it is almost always because I was wrong about how many roots the tree has close to the trunk. I carefully excavate the tree out thinking I have plenty of roots and then realize later that the roots that I thought belong to the tree are from a different tree and my trees roots are actually away from the trunk.
Hah! I have the same problem. Sometimes I'll come back with a nice rootball only to discover the feeder roots in it are from various ground covers and not my soon-to-be-dying tree. Really sucks when I had to hike all that useless dirt down a mountain :mad:

My experience this year has been that setting up a misting system for yamadori is a big win. At least in my low humidity summer climate. If you don't get enough roots the misting system gives the tree enough time to generate more before the top dries out and dies. Misting manually once or twice a day is better than nothing but it's not the same as an automated system. IMHO it's worth the investment for anyone serious about collecting.
 

August44

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Hah! I have the same problem. Sometimes I'll come back with a nice rootball only to discover the feeder roots in it are from various ground covers and not my soon-to-be-dying tree. Really sucks when I had to hike all that useless dirt down a mountain :mad:

My experience this year has been that setting up a misting system for yamadori is a big win. At least in my low humidity summer climate. If you don't get enough roots the misting system gives the tree enough time to generate more before the top dries out and dies. Misting manually once or twice a day is better than nothing but it's not the same as an automated system. IMHO it's worth the investment for anyone serious about collecting.
The misting system sounds good to me. How often and how long during the day? Also would bagging them with a large clear bag work as well? Thanks!
 

ShadyStump

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I know this a is a pretty general question, but if collecting conifers like Ponderosa, Larch, Lodgepole, spruce, Subalpine firs, and Mt Hemlocks, how far away from the base/trunk would you start digging down to be safe realizing that the diameter might be reduced when you get it on the table back home and have more of an idea of the root situation? I realize that the soil conditions where you dig would have a lot to do with it too.
Tree farmers around here (small timers mind you, digging six-footers by hand) will most often say start at least 2 feet out from the trunk, and some say a foot for every inch in trunk diameter.
Never works out that way in the field when collecting, but it's where I tend to start my digging strategy.
 
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That's a nice juni!

Collecting after it rains helps hold the root ball together…but the trade off is the 50 lb carry.
The heat is finally breaking…pack is already packed up and organized. So ready to get to the mountains.👻
 
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Anybody collect in Maryland? What are the rules and regulations for someone who hasn't taken this step?
Contact the forrest service to get permits.
Don’t go without them please. All It takes is few people collecting without permits to ruin it.
Or make friends with people who have forested property.
Good luck!
 

August44

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Contact the forrest service to get permits.
Don’t go without them please. All It takes is few people collecting without permits to ruin it.
Or make friends with people who have forested property.
Good luck!
In many cases the Us Forest Service makes it very hard to obtain a permit to collect. Two of them near me require that you be there in person to get a permit and the permit is only good for 2 weeks. If I am going to collect in a forest 60 miles away on the weekend (of course they aren't open), I have to go over and back a day or so before collecting in order to get a permit BEFORE I plan on collecting. Another office 6 hrs away will do the work over the phone, take my Visa card and the permit (which they email to me) is good for the rest of the year. Really frustrating just to collect some small trees. I have no idea why they operate the way they do. They leave it up to the Ranger that is in charge of the area verses having rules that make sense.
 

woodkraftbonsai

Yamadori
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In many cases the Us Forest Service makes it very hard to obtain a permit to collect. Two of them near me require that you be there in person to get a permit and the permit is only good for 2 weeks. If I am going to collect in a forest 60 miles away on the weekend (of course they aren't open), I have to go over and back a day or so before collecting in order to get a permit BEFORE I plan on collecting. Another office 6 hrs away will do the work over the phone, take my Visa card and the permit (which they email to me) is good for the rest of the year. Really frustrating just to collect some small trees. I have no idea why they operate the way they do. They leave it up to the Ranger that is in charge of the area verses having rules that make sense.
This has been my experience as well. I have had luck with getting a permit mailed, once. Other staff in the SAME ranger office refused to mail out a permit.
 

Shogun610

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Currently I have permission in locations in VT, NY so far .. working on New Hampshire and Maryland locations. The tough part is deciding when to go fall or spring.. fall might be easier logistically .. got heat mats and wood to build recovery boxes.
 

Hartinez

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Collected 2 more one seed juniper this fall and I’m feeling quite confident about them all. Great root ball and undisturbed, mostly, and a seemingly great root system. Potted in 100% pumice within an hour of collection. Full shade. The fall monsoons have me feeling really good about these also. We’ve gotten such great rain this year. For us at least.
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Currently I have permission in locations in VT, NY so far .. working on New Hampshire and Maryland locations. The tough part is deciding when to go fall or spring.. fall might be easier logistically .. got heat mats and wood to build recovery boxes.
I'm working on info with a maryland natural resources specialist, we'll see! If you want a digging partner in maryland I'd be happy to tag along and learn!
 
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The BLM is easier to work with, but probably not much BLM land on the East Coast.
 

Potawatomi13

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Still kickin!
I hope it can strengthen up in the next few weeks before temps drop.
l have pretty heigh hopes… just wish l haden’t chafed off a section of old bark hiking it out😅
Mistakes🤪. As long as tree survives is small price and scar could add interest😌. 🤞🤞🤞🤞🤞🤞🤞.
 
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