A tricky test ;-)

bonhe

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2 different kinds of Japanese maples were pictured at the same time. Can you guess why their leaves are quite different?
Hint: they are in the same site of the garden. Good luck :)
Bonhe
 

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gibmeister

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Thanks Bonhe. I will be looking forward to the answer on this one because I have maples like the one on the right.

Gib
 

treebeard55

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Interesting that you post this right now: I've got an Amur maple with leaves that look much like the picture on the left. I'm thinking a nutrient deficiency, but haven't been able to nail down which nutrient. Yet.

The picture on the right looks to me like leaf scorch; maybe from heat, maybe from overfertilizing. But if it were my tree I'd investigate more before I settled on a course of action.
 

Paul H.

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my guess is that one get much more afternoon sun .
 

TheSteve

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Water hardness would affect both but I'm thinking that either the crispy shades the other and protects it. Or... the crispy one was somehow blocked from getting water. Either way it's drying out.
 

ianb

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I was thinking maybe one was watered with tap water and the other was watered differently. As they were both in the same location.
 

AlainK

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I was thinking maybe one was watered with tap water and the other was watered differently. As they were both in the same location.
Water and soil : to me, the one on the right has a root problem. It doesn't dry enough between watering, and this might cause fungal diseases in the end.
 

crhabq

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The right picture reminds me of my japanese maples last year. This year I have adequate shade and have used Cloud Cover, an anti-transpirant. (Also adding white vinegar to my water and useing humates.) On the other hand, this year a have a Ap seedling that is thriving, a koto no ito and beni shenihenge that are holding their own and a coulple of dead katsuras. Maybe the difference is cultivar suitablity to your climate?
 

bonhe

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You air layered it?
They are not air layered.

I was thinking maybe one was watered with tap water and the other was watered differently. As they were both in the same location.
More hint: those trees are in same site, same lighting, same water.

Water hardness would affect both .
I like your thinking process.
Bonhe
 
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I am guessing one was watered from above at sunset and the other was watered from below the foliage.

this is Ang3lFir3 btw.. forgot to log vic out
 

chappy56

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Could the brown leaved one be from wind burn?
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Well Bonhe...??? Time to share what's going on with the maples?
Thanks!
Brian
 

greerhw

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In Oklahoma, it's the hot drying winds, that's why I gave up on D trees. I was told a long time ago, that if your leaves are brown, they are drying out, if they turn black, they are too wet, that's pretty much the extent of my D tree knowledge.

keep it green,
Harry
 
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mapleman77

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One of the pictures is of new growth. The other one is a picture of older leaves that have leaf burn (pretty bad, too!). Is that it????
 

Si Nguyen

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It's a combination of problems. The scorched leaves are from a weak tree with hard alkaline watering and too much sun and wind. I used to get this alot on my maples. The best treatment I found is to water alot to keep the root ball evenly moist at all time, only fertilize with cottonseed meal which add alot of acidity, and partial shade including for the pot to keep it cool. Southern California is too hot and dry for maples, and our water is bad. Chemical fertilizers are horrible for maples. When the cottonseed meal decompose, they help produce alot of beneficial fungi for the tree. And do not feed when the leaves are chlorotic either, start with a little bit of iron supplement first then wait a few weeks before feeding. Nitrogen fertilizer given alone when the tree is iron deficient would actually burn it more.
Ok, so what's the answer?
 

cray13

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Are they are in different types of soil? Different organic components or different Organic to Inorganic ratio?

If the amount of water and sunlight are the same then I'm guessing the most obvious and assuming you have an issue with the soil.
 

RyanFrye

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The one that is browning is actually a variegated variety and therefore more susceptible to sun and wind burn?
 
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