Almost A Clean Slate New Garden

Arcto

Chumono
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Western Washington
#1
We just relocated to the olympic peninsula. As we settle in, I want to build a garden where I can work on and display my trees as well as grow some fruits and vegetables. @MACH5, @JudyB and others have shown the great work they have done. I thought I could start at the very beginning and have an ongoing thread on this. I chose a location on the west side of the yard. It gets the first sun of the morning and remains sunny until mid afternoon. There is a wooded belt west of it that breaks up the cool winds that occur here frequently. Here are a few pics of the area before I did anything but drive in a few stakes. . 6D40A773-1CF5-449F-9A3C-AE5C3B0B3A99.jpeg D63C0DD6-4CD5-4E99-8E59-43ED98B60A67.jpeg DC637280-A11F-43EC-8112-59472B9F8A57.jpeg 87F549CE-D8B3-4B3D-8AFC-A3C90A4FE074.jpeg 3BE44141-F462-4968-839B-F4A96EE264E8.jpeg Right now all the trees a jammed together on the deck. That won’t do especially with a hungry doe hanging out here all the time. C2F261B4-E169-4935-9CB1-F5A6BE18DBD9.jpeg
 

Arcto

Chumono
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Western Washington
#2
The work has started. Yesterday I dug out several plants I can repurpose in the landscape at some point. They are healed in waiting relocation. D2E538DE-7AD1-4FEF-8B8D-5C59DECD4032.jpeg For infrastructure, I plan on adding a small greenhouse and enclosing the area with a deer fence. Today I did a lot of heavy tractor work while there was still some room to maneuver. 89243D68-2605-43B0-A286-6B2400E2598C.jpeg I dug out a existing berm and stockpiled the dirt for future berms and raised beds. E717B637-7C9C-4984-8533-D4C7352432D5.jpeg The existing rocks were big, almost too big for the tractor. What’s funnier than watching a guy in his 6th decade trying to roll rocks into a bucket? The 6th decade guy not succeeding. 26AC0889-BDB6-4AE8-A736-49DA3F56396C.jpeg A leveled pad for the greenhouse. 3676B99C-0189-4AC0-A755-0911FE5F101A.jpeg
 

markyscott

Masterpiece
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Houston, TX
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#4
Nice choice on the move. I lived in Bremerton and then Poulsbo for awhile. One of my favorite places on the planet. There are days in the summer when it feels like living in a crystal. The winter is another thing altogether, but there are a lot of trees that grow great there and hiking in the Olympics is fantastic. I’ve traveled back numerous times since I left. Was there just last summer.

S
 

Arcto

Chumono
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#5
Every place has it’s challenges and problems. This scared me more than hungry deer or a rattlesnake. This small white pine in the landscape was infected with White Pine Blister Rust. C74DFD15-3780-4A4B-B7E8-ADEEEF065B5B.jpeg Here you can see that the infection has spread thru the main trunk. A doomed tree. I removed it to hopefully help disrupt the fungus cycle. 099F313F-18E2-4D2E-849F-B98ADFABF6C3.jpeg
 
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Location
Vancouver Island, British Columbia
USDA Zone
8b
#9
The work has started. Yesterday I dug out several plants I can repurpose in the landscape at some point. They are healed in waiting relocation. View attachment 199195 For infrastructure, I plan on adding a small greenhouse and enclosing the area with a deer fence. Today I did a lot of heavy tractor work while there was still some room to maneuver. View attachment 199194 I dug out a existing berm and stockpiled the dirt for future berms and raised beds. View attachment 199196 The existing rocks were big, almost too big for the tractor. What’s funnier than watching a guy in his 6th decade trying to roll rocks into a bucket? The 6th decade guy not succeeding. View attachment 199192 A leveled pad for the greenhouse. View attachment 199193
Congrats on the move! Great project. Having done something similar over a decade ago i have a couple of suggestions. Use deer and rabbit wire. Leave posts taller and run coated clothesline through the posts at a higher level than the deer wire. Deer wire is typically 6 feet and the deer often clear seven feet! Rabbits quickly learn to jump through deer wire and openings of suitable size at lower levels. here is a quick snap of how i dealt with the issues. Just some thoughts from a similar location. have fun. IMG_0806.JPG
 

MACH5

Masterpiece
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Northern New Jersey
#10
Very nice Arcto! It shows a lot of promise and look forward to what you do with it. Congrats on the move. The Olympic Peninsula sounds idyllic.

When I set out to design my garden, I also wanted a place to display my trees but also practical enough to work in it. So I try and keep it open enough to move around and about. If you are planning to use gravel as your ground cover just know that it does need care and maintenance to keep it looking nice and fresh.
 

Arcto

Chumono
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Western Washington
#11
Congrats on the move! Great project. Having done something similar over a decade ago i have a couple of suggestions. Use deer and rabbit wire. Leave posts taller and run coated clothesline through the posts at a higher level than the deer wire. Deer wire is typically 6 feet and the deer often clear seven feet! Rabbits quickly learn to jump through deer wire and openings of suitable size at lower levels. here is a quick snap of how i dealt with the issues. Just some thoughts from a similar location. have fun. View attachment 199246
Thanks! Yes, deer and other critters have been a way of life for us. At the last place, there was an old retaining wall on the river bank maybe 6 1/2 to 7’ tall. Watched some elk jump up to the top of it without a lot of trouble one day. Planning a 7’ fence. Any higher here and it triggers a permit process. Will check out the fence meshes available, then figure out the rabbit angle. That is a very well done gate you have there. Looks like you incorporated the greenhouse as part of your fence barrier. I was thinking the same thing. Deer fence can get a little pricey.
 

Arcto

Chumono
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Western Washington
#12
Very nice Arcto! It shows a lot of promise and look forward to what you do with it. Congrats on the move. The Olympic Peninsula sounds idyllic.

When I set out to design my garden, I also wanted a place to display my trees but also practical enough to work in it. So I try and keep it open enough to move around and about. If you are planning to use gravel as your ground cover just know that it does need care and maintenance to keep it looking nice and fresh.

Thanks for the kind words! I agree about the practical side. Especially as this is a multi purpose garden. Not sure yet about the ground cover. Ideally, I would like to retain access to get my tractor in for any heavy stuff. Working around yesterday, I found a number of wet soft spots that the tractor sunk in. That could mean a heavy under fabric and lots of gravel to hold all the weight. The deer fence would limit my elbow room too. I suppose I could cough up more coin to expand the fence. Or stay in budget and consider it a deferred liability when I slam into the fence with the tractor at some point. College was long ago. I don’t remember a case study of that scenario in any business class!
 
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Vancouver Island, British Columbia
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#13
Thanks! Yes, deer and other critters have been a way of life for us. At the last place, there was an old retaining wall on the river bank maybe 6 1/2 to 7’ tall. Watched some elk jump up to the top of it without a lot of trouble one day. Planning a 7’ fence. Any higher here and it triggers a permit process. Will check out the fence meshes available, then figure out the rabbit angle. That is a very well done gate you have there. Looks like you incorporated the greenhouse as part of your fence barrier. I was thinking the same thing. Deer fence can get a little pricey.
The reasoning behind incorporating the greenhouse was to make the transfer of plants back and forth to benches and grow beds easier. The disadvantage was taking up space within the enclosure! The part you see above is the extension. Originally the front door of the green house was in the enclosed area, then i added on to incorporate the greenhouse with additional grow beds and benches. There is a similar gate to the right of the greenhouse.
For rabbits i chose to add 1 inch chicken wire along the bottom in sections up two feet high. Also took advantage of the rocks all over my acreage and lined them up along the bottom in spots to prevent digging. They are industrious little critters. I have not figured out a way to stop the little bandit in the second picture. Fortunately they do not bother tree's, just tea bags full of fertiliser! There is a small river along the back of my acreage.
Are you planning on attending the Rendezvous in Portland area this September?
 

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Arcto

Chumono
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#14
The reasoning behind incorporating the greenhouse was to make the transfer of plants back and forth to benches and grow beds easier. The disadvantage was taking up space within the enclosure! The part you see above is the extension. Originally the front door of the green house was in the enclosed area, then i added on to incorporate the greenhouse with additional grow beds and benches. There is a similar gate to the right of the greenhouse.
For rabbits i chose to add 1 inch chicken wire along the bottom in sections up two feet high. Also took advantage of the rocks all over my acreage and lined them up along the bottom in spots to prevent digging. They are industrious little critters. I have not figured out a way to stop the little bandit in the second picture. Fortunately they do not bother tree's, just tea bags full of fertiliser! There is a small river along the back of my acreage.
Are you planning on attending the Rendezvous in Portland area this September?
Good point. The most level spot in the garden is the greenhouse footprint here. Raccoons can be a pain. I’ve seen fish hatcheries run electric fence wire about 6-8” high around hatchery pools to keep otter, mink and raccoons at bay. Not sure the cost is worth it for a few tea bags though. Is that erosion fence around the fence bottom at the left? Not sure about the Rendezvous. Currently, I don’t have any vision beyond the middle of next week lol. When we get settled down and settled in, I’ll start thinking of more about the future. Your setup looks very nice.
 
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#15
Good point. The most level spot in the garden is the greenhouse footprint here. Raccoons can be a pain. I’ve seen fish hatcheries run electric fence wire about 6-8” high around hatchery pools to keep otter, mink and raccoons at bay. Not sure the cost is worth it for a few tea bags though. Is that erosion fence around the fence bottom at the left? Not sure about the Rendezvous. Currently, I don’t have any vision beyond the middle of next week lol. When we get settled down and settled in, I’ll start thinking of more about the future. Your setup looks very nice.
Nope, just some leftover brick to keep bunnies from digging under the front area next to the driveway. The rocks are placed along the bottom everywhere else! You may be noticing the sides of grow beds just behind the wire as well. I understand the day by day planning. I have lodgepole pine and Douglas fir waiting to be cleared in another part of the acreage!
 
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Western Washington
#16
One small perk of doing a project like this is that the existing landscape is being altered and some plants are suddenly in the way of your goal. A 4’ Red Flowering Currant and a 10’ Vine Maple were both growing where the greenhouse was going to go. Not the ideal time to collect, but both had finished pushing most growth and were in the seed/berry development stage. Nothing to lose, so they got a rough chop and were then dug. Both are pushing adventitious buds now. We’ll see how they do. DC74309A-5EFA-4635-96B8-2A8F7C8094FB.jpeg
 

GrimLore

Imperial Masterpiece
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South East PA
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#17
I have not figured out a way to stop the little bandit in the second picture. Fortunately they do not bother tree's, just tea bags full of fertiliser! There is a small river along the back of my acreage.
I have raised, released wild Raccoons. I down loaded the picture, blew it up, and it appears to be mature. I would be FAR more concerned it shows itself in broad daylight - serious, that is not good. I strongly suggest you contact local authorities such as the SPCA and/or Conservation...

All else looks good in such a short time but that Raccoon is trouble, do not approach it.

Just my two pennies and best of luck as you grow!

Grimmy
 

Arcto

Chumono
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Western Washington
#18
Last week the greenhouse went in. It came as a giant erector set. I had an erector set as a kid. I sucked at making things with it. This looked like the erector set from hell, so I had the local distributor set it up. Saved my sanity and marriage. Money well spent. 0F8D53C6-296B-41F4-BB8E-7356E69CE281.jpeg It was shoe horned in at the end of the level area. That meant steps. I repurposed more big rocks from the old landscape. 8BF45B19-608E-41C6-BA57-358E17F33085.jpeg 4E584491-B30C-482C-949B-149C7CD26E4A.jpeg
This house burned to the ground in the mid 90s, totally rebuilt. The previous owner salvaged a bunch of sandstone flag from the original house. Definitely gonna use this stuff! D7342D47-788C-4BA9-9C59-E1C2B47E2615.jpeg You can still see the ash and charcoal from the fire on a lot of it. 800A9B57-2469-481E-8E46-386CA71B0FE7.jpeg
Back servant’s entrance to the greenhouse (that’s me). I built the steppers up enough to protect the door sill from a beating when I roll wheelbarrows and carts in and out. F9860EFA-BBB7-4DE8-81EA-D60F4EAF3074.jpeg
747E3BBF-CB39-4AE7-8CE8-6146784D53C8.jpeg The reshaped berm that will be the focal point of the garden. Boulders to the left still need to be seated. The Red Flowering Current on the left is an alternate host to WPBR and will be removed. The deer gnawed Kousa Dogwood on the right stays. The big Vine Maple in the center may have a pot in it’s future.
 

Arcto

Chumono
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Western Washington
#19
I decided to put 3 monkey poles outside the garden near some fruit trees next to the house. Kind of a show n tell spot to see from the front deck. I plan to use some of the sandstone as the platforms on the posts. 0C6CCF5D-D683-4C25-B753-3AB428EF7832.jpeg
Last night, the deer came by and left me some feedback about putting posts by THEIR fruit trees. A866239A-38EF-4976-AD2E-3EC624154120.jpeg
Dragonfly watching the show on an apple tree. 8BA3F0AA-0651-492F-A1A6-284B5F60BF60.jpeg
 

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