alpine fir - abies lasiocarpa

tom tynan

Mame
Messages
144
Reaction score
0
Location
new york state
Enclosed is a sub-alpine fir ie. abies lasiocarpa collected in the mountains of Oregon. Trunk dimension at the base is approx. 3 1/2". Most of the deadwood is natural; except the carved area in the middle of the trunkand at the far left. Initial styling is complete and other than refinements to the deadwood areas nothing until the late fall next year. The tree is anywhere from 240 to 360 years in age; 1/8" of trunk diameter growth per 10 years or 15 years depending on the collected elevation.

The wood is very dense and carves beautifully - too bad these trees are suspect to the loggers saw and used for door drames and casework....

The crown is much fuller and lush in person. The camera optics make it appear much flatter.

In the Fall of next year after new buds have set; more fine detail wiring on the seconday branches to create a fuller crown.

Initial work on this tree in October of 2006 at Jim Doyle's Nature Way Nursery in PA. with Walter Pall and Jim Doyle.

Comments, ideas and further suggestions welcome.

Tom
 

Attachments

tom tynan

Mame
Messages
144
Reaction score
0
Location
new york state
I should have mentioned that the alpine fir was collected by Randy Knight of Oregon Bonsai. See the photo below of the tree at the rough time of collection. Lots of small branches growing along this curved trunk....all but one were edited out during the initial styling....

In addition...several more photos of the crown interior and the carved area at the right side; this needs further detailed carving, burning with a small torch and then brushing and treating with lime sulphur.

Alpine fir are reported to be so dense that the wood does not float [see the book "The Bonsai Workshop" by Herb Gustafson]. I won't test the theory out on this tree you can be sure...
 

Attachments

Tachigi

Omono
Messages
1,201
Reaction score
27
Location
PA.
USDA Zone
6b
Hi Tom, Are you considering a different potting angle?
 

tom tynan

Mame
Messages
144
Reaction score
0
Location
new york state
Tom....It may be hard to tell from the photos...but the third picture in the first post is the preferable viewing angle....the tree will need to be angled forward I think.....or raised several inches in the back. This should have the affect of bringing the crown more forward and less leaning back - a bit more dynamic as well.

The first photo in the first post is a top view - looking down on the tree/crown.

I am open to suggestions, if there are any, concerning the potting angle - it will be a few years away until the rather large root mass can be safely reduced....
 

JasonG

Chumono
Messages
786
Reaction score
13
Location
NW Oregon
Looking good Tom!!! It is not to often that you see someone posting Sub Alpine Fir on the forums.... pretty rare infact! Keep up the good work with native species.... Oh, and thanks for the plug :)

Jason
 

rlist

Shohin
Messages
294
Reaction score
3
Location
Portland, OR
USDA Zone
8a
Hey Tom. This tree is coming along nicely. I remember the tree, but never knew who ended up with it, and heard from Walter that he was very excited that someone actually brought one to a workshop - its all coming together now... Walter, Jason, Randy and I spoke about the future of firs in bonsai, and Walter believes it is one of the most overlooked species available for collection. Prior to that I had collected 4 firs (subalpine, silver & grand), and am somewhat eager to work them in years to come. Thanks for posting and leading the pack with firs!
 

tom tynan

Mame
Messages
144
Reaction score
0
Location
new york state
Hey Jason & Rich....Thanks for checking in on this one...Firs do make great bonsai material and surprisingly will back bud even on old wood. There were numerous buds that were sprouting from the branch that I wrapperd in raffia/wire to form the new crown. Of course they grow better in the NW parts of the United States...but they can be grown in the Northeast as well - with a few adaptations. My tree grows in full sun till early June - then goes under partial shade until mid-September or until Fall arrives. Then it goes back in the full sun. With a well draining soil mix they get water everyday-Spring thru the late Fall/early winter. The partial shade just helps with the heat/humidity that we get here in the NY/NJ area....

Jim Doyle showed me the underside of a fir needle using a magnifying loop and you would not believe the number of pores on the underside of the needle - so this really shows how the needles draw in the moisture....Jim has worked with these trees for a number of years....

Firs do naturally cross or hybridize with other firs so it is possible to have a sub-alpine/silver mix....but who cares!!! They have these incredible trunks....

I am hoping to make the trip out to see you guys in June - we will have to work Jason over for a spot where he has located some new trees...
 

rlist

Shohin
Messages
294
Reaction score
3
Location
Portland, OR
USDA Zone
8a
Yeah, he mentioned you would be out. We have a secret fir spot that I think we will take you to. Gonna have to sew your lips shut of course... :)
 

Similar threads


Top Bottom