Another stump

John Hill

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This is another stump that I have been demising for the last four years or so. It is close to being somewhat a nice tree. Bonsai? I don't know but it will make a nice tree in my backyard.
I was going to approach graft it to better the nebari but decided not to. Could cause more problems then it already has. It is slowly growing on me and I like looking at it in the fall.

A Friend in bonsai
John
 

irene_b

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Bonsai's can be Imperial sized as well John.
Irene
 

Dale Cochoy

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John,
I'm no expert, but...
that trident looks like pretty darn good stock to me!

Dale
 

Bonsai Nut

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I would try leaning the trunk to the left and see what comes up out of the soil on the right. Here is a quick virtual of what you could do just sinking the left side. Suddenly the branch on the right becomes a possible new leader. I don't know but I love the potential of this trunk and I would shift it until I got a nice nebari, then I would decide on the upper half of the tree design with what the nerbari dictated...

 

Rick Moquin

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John,

To me stumpy as you affectionately call him is not a major detraction IMO. Mind you it is a fault should you decide to show this tree, but other than that it is a good tree to enjoy.

If that stump is really really bothering you, then I would recommend scaring the living daylights out of the present root formation (below the basal flare we presently see on the tree), apply rooting hormone and plant it out in a grow box for a season or two, ground layering new roots. The tree is potted in your normal medium whilst the layer is straight turface or similar (Japanese sand). Once new roots form wean the old ones off gradually. I was successful with this Hinoki with the aforementioned method. The growth was so prolific that what I thought would take a couple of years, took one growing season. It was potted in this training pot this spring. 2/3 of the parent roots were removed, with the remainder probably next repot. Pic the tree in June '07
 

Dale Cochoy

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I don't think so Bnut.
That is burying A LOT of trunk below the soil and doubling the depth of the pot.
Plus, you are not accounting for the roots that will come out of the soil on the right side....probably.
Dale
 

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That is burying A LOT of trunk below the soil and doubling the depth of the pot. Plus, you are not accounting for the roots that will come out of the soil on the right side....probably.
Dale

Desperate times call for desperate measures my friend :) Maybe it's because I find myself completely incapable of killing trident maples. I don't consider tilting the trunk that drastic of a fix considering other alternatives like airlayering, grafting roots, or whatever else people can imaginatively consider. The reality is that someone either needs to fix the nebari, or they should stick it in their yard as a landscape plant :)

As far as the depth of pot goes, I would eliminate all downward growing root mass - using a plane if I had to. You might accomplish all of this over a couple of years - scoring the section of the trunk that you bury and applying root hormone to get higher surface roots, then eliminating the older, lower roots. However, I think you'd be talking a nice quality bonsai in less than 10 years...
 

Dale Cochoy

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BonsaiNut;5829]Desperate times call for desperate measures my friend :) I don't consider tilting the trunk that drastic of a fix considering other alternatives like airlayering, grafting roots, or whatever else people can imaginatively consider. The reality is that someone either needs to fix the nebari, or they should stick it in their yard as a landscape plant :)

I disagree.....a lot!

As far as the depth of pot goes, I would eliminate all downward growing root mass - using a plane if I had to. You might accomplish all of this over a couple of years - scoring the section of the trunk that you bury and applying root hormone to get higher surface roots, then eliminating the older, lower roots. However, I think you'd be talking a nice quality bonsai in less than 10 years

That is REALLY what you would do huh?
Ok, I bow to your expertise!:rolleyes:

I think it's a nice tree now.:eek:

Dale
 

irene_b

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I like it as well but would consider grafting roots to the side.
Irene
 

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That is REALLY what you would do huh?
Ok, I bow to your expertise!:rolleyes:

Dale, I'm trying to understand your concerns about my recommendation. Is it a question of artistic eye (i.e. that you think the stump looks good the way it is) or technique (i.e. that you think the tree would die).

The technique is not that advanced, and I can point to several articles demonstrating very dramatic work on field-grown trident stumps - including planing the bottom of the trunk as well as using chisels to eliminate major roots, unsightly scars or imperfections.

As far as the artistic eye goes - I guess we can agree to disagree :) You like the tree unchanged, and I would like to change it :) I'm not trying to convince you to change your mind - rather I am saying that of all the ways you COULD change this tree, here is the way that I would recommend doing it. Not saying it is the only way... but it is a very possible and practical way.
 

John Hill

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Hi Dale,
You have seen this tree first hand ;) It is a nice piece of stock for sure the clubbed foot kinda grows on you.
I am surrprised that no one has mentioned the long top, but maybe Irene, saying could become imperial ;) Irene it would have to grow another 4 feet ;)

Bnut I did think of what you suggested but it would, like Dale said have to be potted into a very deep pot 6 to 8 inches at least. I think that one could use this clubbed foot as a focal point,, maybe?
My original fix was to graft seedlings to the one side. This is what will probably be done in the future. Right now I am letting the top grow to help heal the major scars at the top. Once this is done then one could probably place back into a shallow grow box that is at least 2' X 2' and graft seedlings to the right side keeping the left side roots trimmed hard at each re pot.

Now I am still learning each and every day.
This is the total height of this tree when it is done (18")
Any and all suggestions will be appreciated for sure cause I am a student of bonsai.

A Friend in bonsai
John
 

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