Best organic/inorganic spider mite/aphid spray that you can use during hot heat?

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#21
So....Spider Mites are the insects leaving those small white bubble-like eggs. I call them eggs but don’t know if they area eggs...just a description. Are those eggs? The bubbles I’ve seen are inside a folded over side of a leaf on some fruit tree leaves...usually around a cotton-like web on the underside of a leaf.
 
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#25
Avid,floramite,in rotation,i sprinkle diamatious earth all around my grow area during hot dry spells and spring,seems to help alot

When you say around your growing area do you mean around your benches or around the soil in your pots? I laid seven dust around all of my benches before vacation to no avail.
 
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#26
So....Spider Mites are the insects leaving those small white bubble-like eggs. I call them eggs but don’t know if they area eggs...just a description. Are those eggs? The bubbles I’ve seen are inside a folded over side of a leaf on some fruit tree leaves...usually around a cotton-like web on the underside of a leaf.

I'm very sure they are eggs. You're talking about the sticky kind of collection of bubbles that you can squish correct on the underside of leaves? If so, those are the eggs. I wiped hundreds of them off after returning from vacation. The folded leaf with cotton like web is the most obvious sign of spider mites. Here are some of the casualties from my current war:
 

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#28
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#29
So....Spider Mites are the insects leaving those small white bubble-like eggs. I call them eggs but don’t know if they area eggs...just a description. Are those eggs? The bubbles I’ve seen are inside a folded over side of a leaf on some fruit tree leaves...usually around a cotton-like web on the underside of a leaf.
That is an egg, but if they are big enough to see well with your naked eyes I don't think they are spider mites. You have to have a very good magnifying glass or microscope to see them well. Very, very tiny.
 
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#30
That is an egg, but if they are big enough to see well with your naked eyes I don't think they are spider mites. You have to have a very good magnifying glass or microscope to see them well. Very, very tiny.

I've got both. I've got tiny spider webs all over the place with eggs as well as the aphids you see in the photo.

I enjoyed your writeup haha, good southern men grow crape myrtles, it'a only right. I love growing Chickasaw and pocomokes, was able to get my hands on several with surprisingly good nebari/trunk flare from a nursery that couldn't sell them last season and chopped them all back.

Were you able to get rid of the aphids with the "nuclear" option you prescribed to me?
 
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petegreg

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#31
And now it becomes funny. Thanks @Mellow Mullet for pics and @Tieball for mentioning bubbles - eggs. Last year I found some eggs on the back of leaves of my virginia creeper, but thought it was something phisiological. Now I Googled spider mites eggs and here we are. Just checked the virginia creeper and I could see the eggs, black spider mites and red spider mites. The Redds should be a predatory ones, so I'll be watching if they can live in harmony, something instead of television. 😀... and of course keeping it under control and watching other species that tend to be affected.
 

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just.wing.it

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#33
Looks like aphids of some sort...
My crape myrtle is the one that gets them more than any other tree I have...
I use Neem/ horticultural oil to suffocate them...
Gotta make sure you spray to under all the leaves really well.
Spray in evening, not in sun.
 

petegreg

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#34
Is this always the case? I see red ones listed as pest variety as well.
Truly I don't know. This must have happened last year out of my sight and nothing wrong happened.
Looks like aphids of some sort...
My crape myrtle is the one that gets them more than any other tree I have...
I use Neem/ horticultural oil to suffocate them...
Gotta make sure you spray to under all the leaves really well.
Spray in evening, not in sun.
I think they're mites. I don't wanna be a heroe of the day, sprayed...
 
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#35
And now it becomes funny. Thanks @Mellow Mullet for pics and @Tieball for mentioning bubbles - eggs. Last year I found some eggs on the back of leaves of my virginia creeper, but thought it was something phisiological. Now I Googled spider mites eggs and here we are. Just checked the virginia creeper and I could see the eggs, black spider mites and red spider mites. The Redds should be a predatory ones, so I'll be watching if they can live in harmony, something instead of television. 😀... and of course keeping it under control and watching other species that tend to be affected.
Thanks. Yup....that’s what I’ve seen. Small eggs and also larger eggs that might be closer in size to 1/32”. Sort of a translucent white color...like a coconut juice color. Sticky...but roll off somewhat easily when a leaf is disturbed.
 
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#37
I've got both. I've got tiny spider webs all over the place with eggs as well as the aphids you see in the photo.

I enjoyed your writeup haha, good southern men grow crape myrtles, it'a only right. I love growing Chickasaw and pocomokes, was able to get my hands on several with surprisingly good nebari/trunk flare from a nursery that couldn't sell them last season and chopped them all back.

Were you able to get rid of the aphids with the "nuclear" option you prescribed to me?
Yes, the nuclear option worked. I always spray the appropriate insecticide when I find an infestation of harmful insects, I have too much time, money, and care tied up in the trees to wait it out to see if natural predators take care of them or to use dish soap or anything else. Nuclear is the best option. I almost lost my best juniper to spider mites. In the article that I linked you can see some pictures of some predation going on, but they could not keep up with the aphids and the honey dew was causing sooty mold, so I nuked them.

The Chickasaws that I have nice trunks, I could have gotten 100 or more. There is an abandoned nursery about 45 minutes from me that has an acre or so of various crepe myrtles and other stuff too. I just don't have any room.
 
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#38
Yes, the nuclear option worked. I always spray the appropriate insecticide when I find an infestation of harmful insects, I have too much time, money, and care tied up in the trees to wait it out to see if natural predators take care of them or to use dish soap or anything else. Nuclear is the best option. I almost lost my best juniper to spider mites. In the article that I linked you can see some pictures of some predation going on, but they could not keep up with the aphids and the honey dew was causing sooty mold, so I nuked them.

The Chickasaws that I have nice trunks, I could have gotten 100 or more. There is an abandoned nursery about 45 minutes from me that has an acre or so of various crepe myrtles and other stuff too. I just don't have any room.

I agree, many people get caught up on inorganic vs organic. If an inorganic solution destroys bugs and safely restores health to a tree, I'll surely choose that solution

And I hear you about space! I checked your site, nice trees bud.
 

petegreg

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#39
Is this always the case? I see red ones listed as pest variety as well.
I'm back because I owe one big Thanks for your input.
Somehow, because of lack of time, my conclusion was based on one return from google pics and what I'd heard before.
Persilimis-and-TSM-with-eggs.001.jpeg
 
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#40
Alright, the bayer 3 in 1 came today. Just sprayed it all over the trees, top and bottom of leaves. I'll keep you all posted on how well it works. Thanks for the input.

@cmeg1 I noticed the spray builds up on the leaves. Should I give it a quick water spray after a few hours to get the glaze off?