Cascade spirea - lemons into lemonade

davetree

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This is a small tree that was the bottom branch on a bigger tree that was broken in a storm, snapped in two. I salvaged what was left and now have a small flowering cascade tree. Small white flowers in spring, beautiful orange fall color, gnarly bark though it is hard to see. The pot is 4 inches tall.
 

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RyanFrye

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Hi Davetree,

I really like it. Accident or not I think it has a lot of potential. Good job "salvaging" it!

Ryan
 

RyanFrye

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Hi Davetree,

Any updates on this one? I'd like to see it in leaf and maybe with a few flowers or two;)
 

davetree

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Hi Ryan -

The tree has leafed out, and been pruned back hard. I prune my spirea bonsai heavily to reduce the long shoots and shorten the nodes. This delays flowering by a month or two, but the result is a much more compact tree. I usually allow several flowers in June/July, will post some pics soon. Thanks for asking.
 

RyanFrye

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Hi Ryan -

The tree has leafed out, and been pruned back hard. I prune my spirea bonsai heavily to reduce the long shoots and shorten the nodes. This delays flowering by a month or two, but the result is a much more compact tree. I usually allow several flowers in June/July, will post some pics soon. Thanks for asking.
This is good to know. You inspired me to give this species a try. I picked one up at lowes and I don't know much about it. Any tips would be great.:D
 

davetree

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Never let them dry out, they can dieback from cold below 25 degrees or so, some dieback of small twigs is natural, I have reduced roots by 75% on a healthy tree with no problems, watch out for aphids, and prune a lot once the tree is established and healthy. I also let the tree grow and get robust, then prune back hard, then repeat, maybe 3-4 times per season. I never let too many flowers bloom, it seems to drain the strength of the tree somewhat. Look for the biggest trunks you can find, and you can reduce them to a stump in the spring and they will bud back easily.

How's that ?
 

RyanFrye

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Never let them dry out, they can dieback from cold below 25 degrees or so, some dieback of small twigs is natural, I have reduced roots by 75% on a healthy tree with no problems, watch out for aphids, and prune a lot once the tree is established and healthy. I also let the tree grow and get robust, then prune back hard, then repeat, maybe 3-4 times per season. I never let too many flowers bloom, it seems to drain the strength of the tree somewhat. Look for the biggest trunks you can find, and you can reduce them to a stump in the spring and they will bud back easily.

How's that ?
That's perfect. Thanks! Do you think it's too late for me to prune it down to basically a stump?
 

davetree

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You could probably prune it back to the main trunk and some branches. It should throw shoots from the branches. Leave some foliage on the branches if you can. Seal the cuts or they will dry out.
 

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