Chamaecyparis Obtusa "Nana"

Rick Moquin

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This tree was purchased in May of '05 and potted up. I thought it looked pretty cool back then (during my humble beginning) with its laid back demeanour and called the tree "Lazy" picture 1.

I was convinced that better movement was achieved in picture 2.
 

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Rick Moquin

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... not liking the trees progress after surfing the net for a while I decided to take this this tree in a new direction and drastically re-styled it the spring of '06 (pic 1) with the result (pic 2) fall of '06
 

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Rick Moquin

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... still not happy with the progress (looked more like a landscape juniper) after serious contemplation during the summer of '07 I saw the trees future in the penjing style (inspired in part from pic 2 in the first post), and took the tree in this new direction. The summer of '08 the tree was allowed to grow unrestricted (pic2) with a projected re-potting this spring, which has taken place (pic3).

The progress of this tree under Persiano's "superfeeding regimen" can be followed on my blog.

Nothing will be done this summer and initial final styling will take place in the fall. The chosen front allows several options and the tree will be repositioned during the next re-pot.
 

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Tiberious

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Looks like the transformation is going good, and I like the new look! I just got my first hinoki this year and so I have been reading on keeping the foliage pinched properly so as to not lose it close in. I was just going to post you some nice articles on hinoki cypress but as I was doing so, I noticed that this is your own blog! Oops :D http://bonsaiwonders-art.blogspot.com/2008/01/taming-hinoki-cypress.html. And a nice blog it is by the way I have been visiting it for all my Hinoki needs, Thank you!
 

Rick Moquin

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Thank you for your kind words and I am glad you are able to find valuable information through my own "bonsai tuition"

This tree has come a long way in a short period of time as they are "nanas". The feeding regimen is working well. I just hope this one makes it as I lost the 2 previous ones in their final stages (their stories can be found on my blog). I have confidence this one will see its final destiny. It is in extremely good health and little work was done to get her in her new pot (complete sequence on my blog). As stated she will be left unencumbered for the growing season with a styling towards the end of the summer.

I didn't do a virt of where I am going as the tree is too full and would take too much time. The angle at which she is planted will give me several options and the tree will be repositioned during the next re-pot with the chosen new front.

Good luck with yours and remember patience is the key with these babies, they throw wobblers (as Prowler would say) for no known reason.
 

Tiberious

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Thanks Rick. Mine has a few years before I will even think about styling, however I would like to start pinching the individual pads (like you show in your blog) this year. It looks like its working wonders for your trees, their nice and full and the foliage looks really healthy. I have a few arborvitae in my yard (which are kind of similiar) and man they are bald all the way inside, so I am definately going to try and prevent this if at possible. Thanks for the updates and its great to see these Hinoki progressions. They seem like slow movers but certaintly seem worth it in the long run.
 

Rick Moquin

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Well she got her final styling a couple of days ago. Refining and tweaking in the future will be of the essence. I am pleased with the results from her not so good beginning.
 

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rockm

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Nice transformation. The byproduct of all your hard work, along with a very nice tree, is an obsolete pot :D

Now that you've reduced the foliage profile, the pot has no counterbalance. It kind of overwhelms the tree...
 
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This has come a long ways Rick and there is certainly a beauty there. Are you planning on removing that overly thick and ramrod straight branch on the right?

How do you manage to keep the foliage so close to the trunk with this species?



Will
 

cquinn

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This has come a long ways Rick and there is certainly a beauty there. Are you planning on removing that overly thick and ramrod straight branch on the right?

How do you manage to keep the foliage so close to the trunk with this species?



Will

Constant pinching, and bend those branches baby! If you look at pictures of old Hinokis that have been in training for a long time (100+ yrs) the branches are dipping and bending every which way but loose.

By the way Will thanks for the work you do on AOB and KOB. I enjoy those sites very much, and think that it's a great contribution on your part.
 

Rick Moquin

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Nice transformation. The byproduct of all your hard work, along with a very nice tree, is an obsolete pot :D

Now that you've reduced the foliage profile, the pot has no counterbalance. It kind of overwhelms the tree...

Patience grasshoper ;) This tree will fill out in due course and will once again be in harmony with the pot.

Because of the root structure, you can see that the tree is sitting approx 10-15 degrees off centre. In subsequent pottings this will be alleviated where, the chosen front will be sitting square with the pot.
 

Rick Moquin

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Foreshortening will look after the ramrod in due course.

If anything Hinokis teach you patience and perseverance. The silhouette is roughly where I am going with this tree and the fluidness of a Chinese design.

In order to achieve the vision, foliage had to be reduced drastically and this is obvious in the photos. Foreshortening of the branches will reduce the silhouette and careful tweaking and repositioning of new fans as they develop will remedy what is deemed to be a problem to some.

Constant pinching on Hinokis only renders "poodle like" pads and sooner or later you will run out of foliage. The trick is to spread the fans, flatten them out and judicially prune the fans. This takes me approximately 6-8 hours to conduct each spring, with nose hair scissors, this was not carried out this last spring as I knew that it would get a styling and haircut come July. By the time I am done my index and major fingers are cut and sore (full of tiny lacerations). One needs to bare-hand this procedure or loose dexterity in the process if trying to protect your fingers. The only solution I have come up with is to take your time and be careful when you snip, regardless your fingers are sore afterwards. While I am carrying out the process I listen to Japanese meditation music that sooth me during this yearly burden.
 
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Constant pinching, and bend those branches baby! If you look at pictures of old Hinokis that have been in training for a long time (100+ yrs) the branches are dipping and bending every which way but loose.

By the way Will thanks for the work you do on AOB and KOB. I enjoy those sites very much, and think that it's a great contribution on your part.


Thanks.

And thanks for the kind words on AoB and KoB, they are greatly appreciated.



Constant pinching on Hinokis only renders "poodle like" pads and sooner or later you will run out of foliage. The trick is to spread the fans, flatten them out and judicially prune the fans.

Thanks Rick, I heard this about pinching before. I only have one Hinoki, given to be by Vance Wood, I think to torture me and slowly drive me insane, a Trojan Horse, if you will.

You know, the community could use a good article on Hinoki, with closeups of the trimming techniques..... :)




Will
 
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Rick Moquin

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You know, the community could use a good article on Hinoki, with closeups of the trimming techniques..... :)

Will

It was written some time ago if folks would check my blog, under articles, then perhaps it wouldn't be a trojan horse after all.
 

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