Dwarf Jade Question, leaves wrinkling after changing soil

power270lb

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Jade was in regular garden soil and I'd barely water it maybe once every 7-10 days and it was fine. Recently got 50 pounds of DE, pumice and lava rock so I switched it out not touching the roots. I use a skewer to see how moist it is and it's like this soil mix is drying out much faster and since it's dropped shriveled up leaves (only a few) but the rest look a little wrinkled. I soaked the pot in water and it still seems to dry out faster as opposed to the rest of my trees in the same mix but they're still very moist. Was always told these things hate being over watered but then I read where some people water almost daily. My setup has a spiderfarmer sf 1000, mars Hydro ts 1000 and another blurple for flowering plants equipped with mylar curtains, humidifier and fan. Can't figure this out it was doing better in regular crap garden soil.
 

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Not a helpful comment at all but I am very interested and will follow this. I have several portulacarias currently in peat-heavy succulent soil and was going to start gradually switching them over to a mix similar to yours.

I will tell you that in my grow tent that is set up similar to your system, and I have just one of my ports in there. In the succulent soil, I am watering it every 2 days and it is thriving. I imagine you could do the same and be just fine.
 

Trenthany

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If you went from a peat heavy nursery blend to a fully inorganic in one go it’s probably just shock. The roots have been constantly and closely surrounded by moisture. Now most of that moisture is draining by. I’m betting the rootball was surprisingly small? Maybe add 1/4 pine bark to your mix so you aren’t watering quite so much?

I’m guessing this sentence just read wrong but throwing the question it in to be sure. You said you didn’t touch the roots? So ball is intact and it is just surrounded with inorganic? Or you mean you didn’t trim the roots and it’s fully repotted in new inorganic soil?
 

Bonsai Nut

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Don't forget, you're not dealing with a tree, you're dealing with a succulent. They have very tender (not woody) roots, and do not like their roots to be touched at all. They love water - yes it's true - but they cannot stand to SIT in water. I would water my portulacaria three times per day in SoCal, both pre-bonsai, and large plants in hanging planters - but they were in inorganic soil mixes in open pots (pond baskets or coir hanging basket liners).

Give it time, and it should recover. The only thing I'll say about your soil mix is that the piece size looks a little large.
 

MrWunderful

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Im one of those water every day guys. And mine are outside all year long so I cant speak to an indoor setup, but mine will wrinkle up after a repot sometimes too.

I think it has to do with disruption of the roots ability to intake water, because ones that I chop to re-root will do that as well. Maybe its the damage to the tiny, fine root hairs but its just a guess.
 

Trenthany

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I’m with everyone else repot shock. Mine always seem to have ridiculously tiny fine roots. That’s after I get the soil off. If that’s what’s left how fine are the feeders I’ve probably broken off? I think it’ll be fine. Water more often for now and let it drain through at least until it starts losing the wrinkles.
 

power270lb

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If you went from a peat heavy nursery blend to a fully inorganic in one go it’s probably just shock. The roots have been constantly and closely surrounded by moisture. Now most of that moisture is draining by. I’m betting the rootball was surprisingly small? Maybe add 1/4 pine bark to your mix so you aren’t watering quite so much?

I’m guessing this sentence just read wrong but throwing the question it in to be sure. You said you didn’t touch the roots? So ball is intact and it is just surrounded with inorganic? Or you mean you didn’t trim the roots and it’s fully repotted in new inorganic soil?
Didn't cut the roots and removed the organic soil. Root ball was surprisingly small yes. I'm afraid to touch it now tbh (adding pine Bark) thank u though bro
 

power270lb

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Don't forget, you're not dealing with a tree, you're dealing with a succulent. They have very tender (not woody) roots, and do not like their roots to be touched at all. They love water - yes it's true - but they cannot stand to SIT in water. I would water my portulacaria three times per day in SoCal, both pre-bonsai, and large plants in hanging planters - but they were in inorganic soil mixes in open pots (pond baskets or coir hanging basket liners).

Give it time, and it should recover. The only thing I'll say about your soil mix is that the piece size looks a little large.
Larger than what I would've liked but I'm new and now it's ordered. I have the Optisorb DE that Adam ask why recommended and it's not uniform with the pumice and lava rock. After spending what I did, anyway around this? Or could u recommend inorganic mixes?
 

Mycin

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This happens to me every time I manipulate the roots or start cuttings from my portulacarias, soon after followed by new growth emerging. As best as I can tell, it's from the jade using the water in the leaves to fuel the new growth. It happens consistently to me but few posters here seem to have shared my experience.

In any case, you're almost guaranteed to have this bounce back soon with the set up you have. Wait until you see new growth to water to avoid root rot. Once temperatures pick up and it's outside, definitely water it every day. In the new freely draining soil, it should really take off. I love jades, consider making a thread in the tropical section :)
 

power270lb

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This happens to me every time I manipulate the roots or start cuttings from my portulacarias, soon after followed by new growth emerging. As best as I can tell, it's from the jade using the water in the leaves to fuel the new growth. It happens consistently to me but few posters here seem to have shared my experience.

In any case, you're almost guaranteed to have this bounce back soon with the set up you have. Wait until you see new growth to water to avoid root rot. Once temperatures pick up and it's outside, definitely water it every day. In the new freely draining soil, it should really take off. I love jades, consider making a thread in the tropical section :)
How often would u water under the setup I have with the soil I have? Compared to ficus' in the same soil, the jade is drying out much faster. Temp in my setup is 80 degrees fahrenheit
 

Mycin

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How often would u water under the setup I have with the soil I have? Compared to ficus' in the same soil, the jade is drying out much faster. Temp in my setup is 80 degrees fahrenheit
I'm still a novice, with only one years experience, so personally I'm focused on getting my trees through the winter alive! I'm erring on the side of underwatering to avoid root rot or other overwatering issues, which means I water thoroughly every 7-10 days. My lights aren't as powerful so your plant will likely need more water, but still maybe best to play it safe for these last few indoor months. Maybe twice a week?

This might be overly conservative but after a successful outdoor growing season I found indoor bonsai to be humbling. With so many more factors to account for, it's challenging enough to keep the trees healthy, nevermind chase vigorous growth. Big respect for the longtime indoor growers
 

Eckhoffw

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This tread is hitting home for me.
I hope you get your P. Afra right!

My jade wilted in my basement storage area about 6 weeks ago.
I thought perhaps it got too cold down there so I brought it up into warmth and put in a southern window.
Watering hasn’t seemed to help at all.
It’s in a pond basket with mostly course soil.
Figuring Perhaps the root ball dried out and became hydrophobic, I tried a dunk.
Fingers crossed!
2B507247-AEDD-4C40-8E54-6571C6E55B3F.jpegFF2AFFBB-7048-40E0-93D9-799B3264458A.jpeg694D935D-80F4-4093-B5E9-10B09AB94B64.jpeg
 

Eckhoffw

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This tread is hitting home for me.
I hope you get your P. Afra right!

My jade wilted in my basement storage area about 6 weeks ago.
I thought perhaps it got too cold down there so I brought it up into warmth and put in a southern window.
Watering hasn’t seemed to help at all.
It’s in a pond basket with mostly course soil.
Figuring Perhaps the root ball dried out and became hydrophobic, I tried a dunk.
Fingers crossed!
View attachment 360738View attachment 360739View attachment 360740
Update. After the dunk treatment, my jade has plumped up and looks good again.
-for what it’s worth.
 
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The more I work with jade and mini jade, the more faith I have in the "dunk treatment." Whenever I have done that, the response has been excellent.
 

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