Grafting 101

River's Edge

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Got a question, which I think it's not been answered before.

Imagine that I have an Acer with a long node. However, It is a thick branch and I don't want to restart it. Can I thread graft a brach in the middle of this long node and then, when it takes and is strong, cut the remainder of the node above? My question is because usually maple cuts die back until they reach an internode so I don't know if having a grafted branch will halt the die back of not.
First acknowledgement that i have not done the exact thing you have described. However, i have completed thread grafts on trunks between nodes and then cut back to that point to continue development and change of direction, It works on the trunk. I see no reason why it would not work on a branch, the tendency is to die back to an active growth site be it a branch or node developing. Pruning is usually back to nodes or active branches with stubs left temporarily. Should be a fairly straightforward experiment and with the way that threadgrafts establish fairly quickly, it would not take long to see the results. If you try the experiment, it is a good idea to consider the position of the threadgraft for both direction and location carefully with an eye to design purposes.
Conversely if the answer to your question was no then that would seem to imply that a threadgraft could only succeed if placed on a node. To my knowledge that has never been a consideration for where to place a threadgraft on a maple.
 

Gustavo Martins

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First acknowledgement that i have not done the exact thing you have described. However, i have completed thread grafts on trunks between nodes and then cut back to that point to continue development and change of direction, It works on the trunk. I see no reason why it would not work on a branch, the tendency is to die back to an active growth site be it a branch or node developing. Pruning is usually back to nodes or active branches with stubs left temporarily. Should be a fairly straightforward experiment and with the way that threadgrafts establish fairly quickly, it would not take long to see the results. If you try the experiment, it is a good idea to consider the position of the threadgraft for both direction and location carefully with an eye to design purposes.
Conversely if the answer to your question was no then that would seem to imply that a threadgraft could only succeed if placed on a node. To my knowledge that has never been a consideration for where to place a threadgraft on a maple.
Cool. That makes sense. I don’t know why I Assumed dieback was to an internode and not to an active growth site, but that makes more sense. That gives a lot more freedom ;) thanks
 

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Cool. That makes sense. I don’t know why I Assumed dieback was to an internode and not to an active growth site, but that makes more sense. That gives a lot more freedom ;) thanks
What is the climate like in the Azores? When could you begin a threadgraft? I usually wire the extensions in place during the previous growing season for a threadgraft very early in the spring before the buds begin to open. Unless the extensions are flexible enough without prior positioning! I. Have found late february, early march best timing in my climate and then i move into the greenhouse for protection from late frosts on the graft.
 

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I already have wired a branch for this purpose during the growing season. I will thread graft when I see buds moving, probably around late February. I have no frosts here so need for protection. In fact, I think I could thread graft in the middle of my winter cause it’s very mild but I want to minimise the time the injury is exposed to potential infections. Here in the Azores everything is a bit different and I am learning to adapt what I read to my reality.
 

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I already have wired a branch for this purpose during the growing season. I will thread graft when I see buds moving, probably around late February. I have no frosts here so need for protection. In fact, I think I could thread graft in the middle of my winter cause it’s very mild but I want to minimise the time the injury is exposed to potential infections. Here in the Azores everything is a bit different and I am learning to adapt what I read to my reality.
Essential key to progress, adaptability to practices based in other climates, and or results based on restricted variables. I am looking forward to getting a glimpse of the Azores in the spring. I will be one of those tourists floating in and out for a day on the way across the Atlantic.
 

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Ah another ? ;)

Since you have limited time here, let me recommend that you go see Lagoa do Fogo if weather is good. Otherwise you won’t see anything but clouds :)
 

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Ah another ? ;)

Since you have limited time here, let me recommend that you go see Lagoa do Fogo if weather is good. Otherwise you won’t see anything but clouds :)
Yes, one of those larger sea kayaks with multiple passengers;). Thanks for the suggestion, i believe we have the day to set foot on land after six full days at sea. I will engage my tour director who is accompanying me to celebrate 50 years of marriage. I think they call it a repositioning cruise, nice term for guaranteed weight gain! Perhaps i can keep my hand in Bonsai by wiring the centrepieces in the dining room or the potted plants around the pool.
 

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Yes, one of those larger sea kayaks with multiple passengers;). Thanks for the suggestion, i believe we have the day to set foot on land after six full days at sea. I will engage my tour director who is accompanying me to celebrate 50 years of marriage. I think they call it a repositioning cruise, nice term for guaranteed weight gain! Perhaps i can keep my hand in Bonsai by wiring the centrepieces in the dining room or the potted plants around the pool.
That’s a lot of marriage years. I got 8 under my belt so far. Anyways, if you go down to the lake (Lagoa do Fogo), you’ll find a beach. It’s all pumice, nice and quite a good size for bonsai ;)
 

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River's Edge

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Thanks for this thread and your advice Markyscott, I read it again and it's an excellent source of info.

For more specific tips on maple grafting, you can have a look these pages from the Maple Society:

Winter grafting:
https://forums.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/threads/winter-grafting.60036/

Summer grafting:
https://forums.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/threads/easy-summer-grafting-technique-for-japanese-maples.65330/
I would advise checking the actual results of these methods before using on Bonsai. Successful grafts horticulturally does not equal aesthetically pleasing Bonsai. The results are available for viewing in most any local nursery.
Grafting techniques specifically for Bonsai have been adapted to produce different results.
 

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Thanks for this thread and your advice Markyscott, I read it again and it's an excellent source of info.

For more specific tips on maple grafting, you can have a look these pages from the Maple Society:

Winter grafting:
https://forums.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/threads/winter-grafting.60036/

Summer grafting:
https://forums.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/threads/easy-summer-grafting-technique-for-japanese-maples.65330/
I would advise checking the actual results of these methods before using on Bonsai. Successful grafts horticulturally does not equal aesthetically pleasing Bonsai. The results are available for viewing in most any local nursery.
Grafting techniques specifically for Bonsai have been adapted to produce different results.
Appreciate the links, Alain. There’s some good general information in there, but I’m with Frank on this one. Those are excellent techniques for nurseymen to graft cultivars with desirable characteristics onto stronger growing rootstock. However, I’ve never used them on bonsai because of the mismatched bark and swelling I associate with these techniques based on what I’ve seen on nursery trees. I’d be cautious about applying them in bonsai culture without first ensuring you’ll be happy with the results in the end.

S
 

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