How to proceed on Trident with knob caused by junction of four branches

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Is this something I need to somehow eliminate, or is it acceptable to leave it (which I doubt).
 

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Firstly, what is your vision for the future of this tree. (style or rough outline of silhoutte)
Are you still building trunk girth?

You probably want to eliminate all but one of those 4 branches, however now is not a great time of year to initiate very large cuts. One thing you could do is remove the smallest branch completely (but leave a stub about 1/2 inch long) and reduce the length of the other three branches. I'd probably cut them a couple of inches off the trunk.

The exception might be if you are going for a broom style, in which case having 4-5 primary branches coming out of a single point is pretty much ideal. But even for this style, the larger branches (and the trunk) are quite thick beyond the point at which all of the broom branchlets split. If you are considering this style, I'd probably cut all of those branches about 1-2 inches from the trunk, but leave the trunk as is. Then come back next spring and do a trunk chop right above your broom point.
 
My initial vision for it was broom style. But I'm open to suggestions so I'm considering all the options that Kanorin raised. However, BobbyLane makes the point that I have been afraid was the case. I'm considering cutting the four branches and then leaving it alone until next spring.
 
if it was mine i would just chop it whenever and seal it but of course opinions will vary on this type of thing. vary rarely do we see any proof of significant die back on trees that were chopped at different stages of the season.

regarding brooms, the issue with this tree is that the top is just too way out of proportion to the trunk, its very difficult material. maybe next time you pick better and bite the bullet with this one. such is bonsai
 
if it was mine i would just chop it whenever and seal it but of course opinions will vary on this type of thing. vary rarely do we see any proof of significant die back on trees that were chopped at different stages of the season.

regarding brooms, the issue with this tree is that the top is just too way out of proportion to the trunk, its very difficult material. maybe next time you pick better and bite the bullet with this one. such is bonsai
I'd trust Bobby's advice here. Considering it is pretty rough stock, it might be best to just chop now and see what happens. If it doesn't survive, you can pick up a new tree with a bit more movement in the lower trunk or at least one that doesn't have such a significant bulge.

The air layer idea is fine too - particularly if you just want to practice air layers or are on a budget and want more trees to work with.
 
You might want to consider waiting until spring and just air layering the whole top off, or back to the first branch.
nothing to lose there, the top might make a decent clump over time. i have actually rooted a trident cutting near that size
 
The best way to turn a negative bulge into a positive is to make it a new base!

Try to cut em off leaving the best high wideness intact, then complete the "noise coming from the dog fight".

2 points for the first answer to the riddle.

Sorce
 
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