Please post some of your trees... :)

Messages
1,045
Likes
3,709
Location
London, England
i know nothing about duranta, but remember seeing one recently advertised on kaizen, would take yours many years to get to this size of trunk, if it grows wild in your country maybe look for a bigger trunk
Duranta - Skyflower Indoor Bonsai Tree
Duranta repens variegata is a species of flowering shrub in the verbena family Verbenaceae, native from Mexico to South America and the Caribbean. It is widely cultivated as an ornamental plant in tropical and subtropical gardens throughout the world, and has become naturalised in many places. Common names include Golden Dewdrop, Pigeon Berry, and Skyflower.
Duranta is a sprawling shrub or small tree. It can grow to 6 m (20 ft) tall and can spread to an equal width. Mature specimens possess axillary thorns, which are often absent on younger specimens. The leaves are typically light green, elliptic to ovate, opposite. The flowers are light-blue or lavender, produced in tight clusters located on terminal and axillary stems, blooming almost all year long. The fruit is a small globose yellow or orange berry. The leaves and berries of the plant are toxic is eaten in large quantities. Duranta is native to the Americas. In its natural state, it commonly grows in rocky or sandy coastal areas with full sun, or moister, disturbed sites inland.
Golden Dewdrop is widely grown as an ornamental plant throughout tropical and warm subtropical regions. Its showy flowers and fruit make it a desirable addition to gardens. There are a wide variety of cultivars available, including 'Alba', 'Aurea', 'Aussie Gold', 'Gold Mound', 'Geisha Girl', 'Sapphire Showers', and 'Variegata'. In Bonsai cultivation duranta is a very simple tree to care for and grows rapidly. The tree will need protection from frost and will make a perfect addition to any conservatory as a centrepiece. Keep outside in a south facing site or greenhouse in summer. Duranta will drink a lot of water when in full growth but will benefit from allowing it to become a little dry between watering. Keep on the dry side over winter or during colder periods.

A nice variegated foliage duranta and a great introduction to the species. A few little cuts to tidy up, in time this will refine really well. An interesting and unusual bonsai tree.

14" tall above it's bonsai pot. 20" wide overall. 6" diameter root flare.

link

https://www.kaizenbonsai.com/duranta-skyflower-indoor-bonsai-tree
 

Attachments

Messages
45
Likes
30
Location
Tanzania, East Africa
So this is the species of tree you are working with? Looks good and worth the time. However you could have mentioned the species of tree up front, that might have helped because what I said still holds to be true.
Honest mistake @Vance Wood, still learning the ropes, and yes I agree spinyerwheelsia is real. So I am keeping it in mind. Also the reason for posting it. Five years for nothing is no good. Any advice on design?

Plus I am hoping some years on, I can post this as bonsai, maybe help a newbie like myself get an idea of how humble beginnings can be.

Cheers
 
Messages
11
Likes
7
Hi Everybody!!

Here's an Aleppo pine that I have been training for 6 months: Coming along pretty well i think :)

Then I posted a Bougi that I collected about a year ago. I had freshly potted it when this pic was taken. I have since defoliated and its looking good with new leaves. I am going to sell this one because I have another that I prefer: probably ask $250 AUD
 

Attachments

Messages
45
Likes
30
Location
Tanzania, East Africa
i know nothing about duranta, but remember seeing one recently advertised on kaizen, would take yours many years to get to this size of trunk, if it grows wild in your country maybe look for a bigger trunk
Duranta - Skyflower Indoor Bonsai Tree
Duranta repens variegata is a species of flowering shrub in the verbena family Verbenaceae, native from Mexico to South America and the Caribbean. It is widely cultivated as an ornamental plant in tropical and subtropical gardens throughout the world, and has become naturalised in many places. Common names include Golden Dewdrop, Pigeon Berry, and Skyflower.
Duranta is a sprawling shrub or small tree. It can grow to 6 m (20 ft) tall and can spread to an equal width. Mature specimens possess axillary thorns, which are often absent on younger specimens. The leaves are typically light green, elliptic to ovate, opposite. The flowers are light-blue or lavender, produced in tight clusters located on terminal and axillary stems, blooming almost all year long. The fruit is a small globose yellow or orange berry. The leaves and berries of the plant are toxic is eaten in large quantities. Duranta is native to the Americas. In its natural state, it commonly grows in rocky or sandy coastal areas with full sun, or moister, disturbed sites inland.
Golden Dewdrop is widely grown as an ornamental plant throughout tropical and warm subtropical regions. Its showy flowers and fruit make it a desirable addition to gardens. There are a wide variety of cultivars available, including 'Alba', 'Aurea', 'Aussie Gold', 'Gold Mound', 'Geisha Girl', 'Sapphire Showers', and 'Variegata'. In Bonsai cultivation duranta is a very simple tree to care for and grows rapidly. The tree will need protection from frost and will make a perfect addition to any conservatory as a centrepiece. Keep outside in a south facing site or greenhouse in summer. Duranta will drink a lot of water when in full growth but will benefit from allowing it to become a little dry between watering. Keep on the dry side over winter or during colder periods.

A nice variegated foliage duranta and a great introduction to the species. A few little cuts to tidy up, in time this will refine really well. An interesting and unusual bonsai tree.

14" tall above it's bonsai pot. 20" wide overall. 6" diameter root flare.

link

https://www.kaizenbonsai.com/duranta-skyflower-indoor-bonsai-tree

Hello,

Duranta are widely cultivated, used mostly as hedges, topiary and such, fewer are used for landscaping. They have a rather unique look when they grow large in the ground; The trunks, exit the ground at a 50-ish degree angle growing up and out with a gentle curve into an umbrella like shape. They are very tough plants and can take rough treatment. Tanzania is a tropical country so I do not have to worry about frost but they get infested with white flies very easily, with most hedging its a matter of how bad. I was thinking more of a small size bonsai for this one, keeping the current height or possibly shorter. I am still hoping to get advice on that side of things for the tree I posted.

I went hunting for material last weekend after seeing the posts online, I found a few that have decent trunk size. They are in the shade in large containers, recovering. I have that same variety growing in my garden. I am waiting for it to thicken up some before digging it up. Its the rainy season now, so I will probably look into getting a few more larger duranta I can dig up.

cheers
 

Attachments

Messages
11,269
Likes
9,510
Location
NE Ohio: zone 5b (USA)
USDA Zone
5b
I have sent Dario a couple of emails over the last couple of years... but he has never responded. Is he out of bonsai?
No just tired of the crap slack he got here from particular members. He actually is at a point in his life he's selling off some of his trees like many do. To have a smaller collection. To allow more time with his family. My friend Barb from Florida just bought an amazing sumo off him that was quite impressive. But he still does bonsai.
 
Messages
12,301
Likes
12,682
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
5-6
No just tired of the crap slack he got here from particular members. He actually is at a point in his life he's selling off some of his trees like many do. To have a smaller collection. To allow more time with his family. My friend Barb from Florida just bought an amazing sumo off him that was quite impressive. But he still does bonsai.
The same old story, it's sad. Without being specific or without doing it himself he pretty much disses all of us through someone who probably had nothing to do with the "Crap Slack" he sites as being the reason for his departing from the site. The truth will probably never be known. The truth, as I remember it from my point of view, and memories of him while here, I enjoyed his posts but he was responsible for a good majority of the Crap that was Slaked----what ever that is.
 
Messages
11,269
Likes
9,510
Location
NE Ohio: zone 5b (USA)
USDA Zone
5b
The same old story, it's sad. Without being specific or without doing it himself he pretty much disses all of us through someone who probably had nothing to do with the "Crap Slack" he sites as being the reason for his departing from the site. The truth will probably never be known. The truth, as I remember it from my point of view, and memories of him while here, I enjoyed his posts but he was responsible for a good majority of the Crap that was Slaked----what ever that is.
I left the forum at that time as well. It was just getting so ugly. Less helpful...and just ugly. I'm not choosing sides with his leaving. But we left (he and I) around the same time. When you lose your joy coming to a place...you question why you go there.
 
Messages
12,301
Likes
12,682
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
5-6
Sometimes you lose your joy from coming to a place because you allowed the naysayers victory over you and started believing their crap. Unless you are talking about me, have you noticed any of those people still here?
 
Messages
11,269
Likes
9,510
Location
NE Ohio: zone 5b (USA)
USDA Zone
5b
Sometimes you lose your joy from coming to a place because you allowed the naysayers victory over you and started believing their crap. Unless you are talking about me, have you noticed any of those people still here?
No...not you Vince. But it was ugly years back. Nothing like that now. But...you do have one's who want chaos over anything else. For example...I am curious who thought my posts were worthy of commenting to one who is banned here...to have that one banned contact me and give me an ultimatum with a day and time over on a social media site. It grows old...ones trying to create more than there already is. Losing my dad...I find I am quick to lose my patience. Grief can do that to a person. I've one's on ignore for my peace...but I also don't wish to just not be snarky to one's over my mood. Doesn't mean I am allowing the other victory...just trying to find my own way.
 
Messages
12,301
Likes
12,682
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
5-6
No...not you Vince. But it was ugly years back. Nothing like that now. But...you do have one's who want chaos over anything else. For example...I am curious who thought my posts were worthy of commenting to one who is banned here...to have that one banned contact me and give me an ultimatum with a day and time over on a social media site. It grows old...ones trying to create more than there already is. Losing my dad...I find I am quick to lose my patience. Grief can do that to a person. I've one's on ignore for my peace...but I also don't wish to just not be snarky to one's over my mood. Doesn't mean I am allowing the other victory...just trying to find my own way.
I understand, I have had problems with people, who are no longer here, at a time when my mother was dying.
 

coh

Masterpiece
Messages
4,421
Likes
3,990
Location
Rochester, NY
USDA Zone
6
No...not you Vince. But it was ugly years back. Nothing like that now. But...you do have one's who want chaos over anything else. For example...I am curious who thought my posts were worthy of commenting to one who is banned here...to have that one banned contact me and give me an ultimatum with a day and time over on a social media site. It grows old...ones trying to create more than there already is. Losing my dad...I find I am quick to lose my patience. Grief can do that to a person. I've one's on ignore for my peace...but I also don't wish to just not be snarky to one's over my mood. Doesn't mean I am allowing the other victory...just trying to find my own way.
Seriously!? Ain't social media wonderful? Be careful, people do actually wind up in "real-life situations" because of interactions on social media. You never know just how crazy that person is behind the screen name.
 
Messages
11,269
Likes
9,510
Location
NE Ohio: zone 5b (USA)
USDA Zone
5b
Seriously!? Ain't social media wonderful? Be careful, people do actually wind up in "real-life situations" because of interactions on social media. You never know just how crazy that person is behind the screen name.
Yes, seriously. Screen shot to prove it before blocking the one. My husband was livid. A grown man...what threatening a woman!?! (Over facts and my opinion based on those facts. In another situation concerning the one banned here. Credibility and quite frankly...apparently irked the one.) I hadn't planned on sharing the info with my husband of this one contacting me.But I had gotten sick while in Honduras...and he was PM'ing a nurse friend of mine. When he stumbled across the verbal text threat. But...made me really ponder those here...who just feed on that sort of thing. Wanting drama to unfold. I blocked the man and didn't respond. But he said a few members here had contacted him over my posts. Again...makes me curious who those ones were. But quite frankly...It's water under the bridge. I have a small circle of friends I trust. Then I have aquaintences I know less. But...this hobby one sees as peaceful and tranquil is full of ones thriving on chaos. But...CCP makes me as a woman think it something worth looking into. Especially when visiting a bonsai friend who is in that ones backyard so to speak.

Edit: the threat was unspoken with a date and time. "I'm going to give you until 12pm tomorrow."
 
Last edited:
Messages
465
Likes
1,060
Location
Southern California
USDA Zone
10
Hello,

Duranta are widely cultivated, used mostly as hedges, topiary and such, fewer are used for landscaping. They have a rather unique look when they grow large in the ground; The trunks, exit the ground at a 50-ish degree angle growing up and out with a gentle curve into an umbrella like shape. They are very tough plants and can take rough treatment. Tanzania is a tropical country so I do not have to worry about frost but they get infested with white flies very easily, with most hedging its a matter of how bad. I was thinking more of a small size bonsai for this one, keeping the current height or possibly shorter. I am still hoping to get advice on that side of things for the tree I posted.

I went hunting for material last weekend after seeing the posts online, I found a few that have decent trunk size. They are in the shade in large containers, recovering. I have that same variety growing in my garden. I am waiting for it to thicken up some before digging it up. Its the rainy season now, so I will probably look into getting a few more larger duranta I can dig up.

cheers
Duranta are awesome. I think they are very under used as bonsai. I'm not an expert on them but I have two. The link is my thread which has both. Feel free to go to this thread and ask any questions you may have. There are a few other members that have nice one also so maybe they will help also.

https://www.bonsainut.com/threads/duranta-old-and-new.33420/
 
Messages
45
Likes
30
Location
Tanzania, East Africa
Duranta are awesome. I think they are very under used as bonsai. I'm not an expert on them but I have two. The link is my thread which has both. Feel free to go to this thread and ask any questions you may have. There are a few other members that have nice one also so maybe they will help also.

https://www.bonsainut.com/threads/duranta-old-and-new.33420/
Hello Thomas,

greetings from East Africa! Thank you very much for posting the link to your thread here, will be visiting soon. I am very excited about duranta and its potential as bonsai material, especially the collected ones pictured above. I agree, if internet posts are anything to go on, they are very under used. Maybe one day I will be an expert on Duranta as bonsai material, fingers crossed. Cheers!
 

Similar threads