REBS Show 2007

Brent

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It took me forever to get around to it, but I finally finished processing the photos from the REBS Show in August. Just click on the link below to go to the blog to see the photos and read the comments. Posting here about the trees is fine with me. I am sure there are some things you would like to discuss, just link to the tree photo.

Brent
EvergreenGardenworks.com
see our blog at http://BonsaiNurseryman.typepad.com
 

Rick Moquin

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Brent,

Thanks for taking the time to share this exhibition with us.

Yes indeed this tree has been posted before on the net. I believe if I'm not mistaken here at Bnut by none other than Al.

This tree as you stated breaks all conventions as we know them, but yet is extremely appealing. It keeps us glued to it with fascination. It is at once distracting and pleasing. While we are glued on it, we are not looking for faults or reasons why we are so mesmerized by it, but simply cannot seem to take our eyes of its rapture and beauty.

I have stared at this tree in 2D and would like to see it in person. Unsure of what this tree evokes in us, but the artist IMO has accomplished his task, whatever that was.
 

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Tachigi

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Thanks for sharing Brent. Being in the gloom here with grey skies, snow, ice and rain for the last 3 weeks, that was totally rejuvenating and just what the doctor ordered.

The white pine is a true favorite of mine. While not looking for faults I couldn't help feel accosted by the wire and raffia. I thought it strange, that one the owner would enter a tree in that stage with "that much large wire". I also found it remarkable that the show would allow it as well. Guess it says a lot to how far we have to go here in the states to refine our exhibition process. I look forward to this fascinating tree being displayed with out crutches.

Once again thanks for taking the time Brent!
 

Brent

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This tree as you stated breaks all conventions as we know them, but yet is extremely appealing. ...
Rick

Well, it doesn't break ALL the conventions, but it is a good example of work arounds that are more successful than a conventional tree. For example, there is still a really good triangular outline of foliage, no rule breaking there. No distracting crossing branches, etc. There are still dozens of rules followed, but what comes through isn't instantly identifiable conventions, but rather beauty through tension, for want of a better phrase.

This tree probably started out as a problematic piece of junk, a couple steps above roadkill bonsai. Such trees are not amenable to traditional treatments and require complex problem solving to achieve a desirable outcome, but when they work, they REALLY work, as here. Walter Pall points out such work arounds because he works with collected material so much. The normal methods just aren't available, you get what you get. He says it doesn't matter where the branches come from as long as they end up where they belong. So, with a collected tree with all the branches coming from high up, just pull them down to put the FOLIAGE where it belongs. Is this rule breaking? I don't think so, just an expansion. The artistic principle is the same because it's the result that matters.

It's the same thing here. This tree is way off balance, but is it? The countermoves in the trunk and the foliage placement bring it back into the world of the acceptable in such a way that a potential fault becomes a pleasing and mystifying aspect. This is the hardest stuff to pull off. Unfortunately, beginners see trees like this and read descriptions like this and take it as license for rule breaking or not learning the rules, it isn't. It's not rule breaking; it's rule transcendence.

Brent
 

Mark

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The unusual trunk is very interesting and I agree that this tree has the potential to be great.
There are however, a number of issues that are disturbing to my eye. Even though it appears that every single branch and branchlet were wired, postioning was not addressed. What I see are branchs that are too straight for a trunk with so much movement. Branch angles that are too uniform. Branch tips that could flaten or turn up slightly and provide some stability to the design. It also appears to me that the branchlets are not positioned to create pads but left in random position with no relationship to his neighbors. The length of 4 branchs on the left side and 3 on the right are too close to the same or end at the same place. All of these issues could be cured or addressed now.

Mark
 

Mark

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The unusual trunk is very interesting and I agree that this tree has the potential to be great.
There are however, a number of issues that are disturbing to my eye. Even though it appears that every single branch and branchlet were wired, postioning was not addressed. What I see are branchs that are too straight for a trunk with so much movement. Branch angles that are too uniform. Branch tips that could flaten or turn up slightly and provide some stability to the design. It also appears to me that the branchlets are not positioned to create pads but left in random position with no relationship to his neighbors. The length of 4 branchs on the left side and 3 on the right are too close to the same or end at the same place. All of these issues could be cured or addressed now.

Mark
 

Hans van Meer

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Nice show and good bonsai, thanks for chairing. And yes that Ceder is absolutely amazing, world class!
Hans.
 

Attila Soos

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Brent,

I really love your comments on the trees.

This is one of the most educational documentation of a bonsai show that I've seen in recent years.
The relatively new technique of developing foliage is something that I've never seen described before, but it makes a lot of sense and solves a lot of problems associated with the traditional foliage pads developed through pinching. I am really greatful that you opened my eyes to this.
 

Taylor Brown

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I love each of these trees. I was wondering where this show is so that I could visit and see them in person. I think that is one of the best ways to learn. If you study something up close it can tell you a lot. Thank you Mr Brent
 

bonsaimeister

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Taylor,

The redwood empire show for this year was held at the Santa Rosa Veterans Memorial Building at 1351 Maple Ave. in Santa Rosa, California.

bonsaimeister
 

Brent

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Tayor

The show is at the Veterans Memorial Hall in Santa Rosa California (across the street from the fairgrounds. Santa Rosa is in N. CA about an hour and a half north of San Francisco. Check out the REBS website. The show is always the fourth Sat and Sun in August. Start planning now!

Attila, that was my reaction too when Jim Gremel dragged me over to one of his big junipers that he and Boon just something like a dozen hours pruning. It was a jaw dropper. It looked even better right after it was pruned than it did two or three months later when it was in the REBS Show, it was a bit fuller.

Brent
 

PeterW

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one of his big junipers that he and Boon just something like a dozen hours pruning. It was a jaw dropper. It looked even better right after it was pruned.

Brent
Thanks for your time on this Brent.
Is the foliage pad method mentioned suitable for Jap Junipers? Can you please just explain in a little more detail when you say for branch selection left, right, left, right, up and also woody branches. Hope i am not wasting your time, but i would be very interested in using this method for one of my junipers.
Thank you.
Merry Christmas all.
Peter.
 

Brent

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Peter

I don't know how else to put it, but the closeup of the juniper I posted in the blog piece above shows it very clearly. You can see how the branchlets were selected and wired. And yes, Jim Gremel's trees that I mentioned directly above is a 'Shimpaku'. It doesn't have to be a coarse foliaged juniper. Juniper wood begins to lignify when it changes from green to reddish. You sort of have to get your head out of foliage 'pads' and more into open branch foliage 'areas'. These areas are much more three dimensional than classical pads.

Brent
 
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