seeds i collected from a unique Acer maple

hinmo24t

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i got about 50 seeds from this tree, its been on my radar to get seeds from it and the time came:
i have half them in my fridge in a bag with some holes in it (along with about 30 kousa and Y holly berry seeds) the other half in my dark desk drawer (found them in my jacket pocket right now)
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anyone know the specs on this maple model? 0-60? jp, i hope i can get a handful of seeds going
under lights around february to cultivate some of them.

looks different than my green maple (coral bark i think)



the parent tree is about 25' here
 

Vance Wood

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Looks like Acer pseudosieboldianum---Purplebloom Maple according to DIr.
There is the likelyhood that the tree will not produce to form through seed culture if this tree is the product of a cultivar variant as opposed to a species.
 

hinmo24t

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thanks, are the ones you two referenced rare or sought?
i have no info on it other than its a head turner. this college im fortunate to have nearby,
the campus theme (maple hall, cedar hall, pine dorm) is trees and it must have been decades ago the entire place
has mature diverse trees. https://www.umassd.edu/media/umassdartmouth/sustainability/pdfs/umassd_tree_field_guide.pdf
there are a lot that arent on that old pdf list! so many that i bet i could get some great seeds over the years.

i can get some small cuttings from this thing in the spring time if its one that doesnt propagate from seed easy...im the local guy who walks his dog there often
 

hinmo24t

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View attachment 335424
?

All jokes aside, upon “taking an inquiring peek” this appears to be my “vote” as well.

🤓
such an epic band!!!!!! so thankful i was brought up on them.


i have to admit the @Pitoon suggestion more via google images but the other one had some resemblance as well.
trying to think if ive seen the thing go mulberry like that



they have some wild lace leaf maples on the campus too, and paperbark, red, sugar, norway, japanese purple or w.e.


also the most pretty gingko and bald cypress as well - heavy (surf jargon)
 

HorseloverFat

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they have some wild lace leaf maples on the campus too, and paperbark, red, sugar, norway, japanese purple or w.e.
VERY cool! (Regarding the varieties!)

Also! I feel it worth mentioning that I have seen Sugars (Sacchs) produce flushes somewhat similar to this.. but only once..

I really HOPE that’s not the case here... that would be anti-climactic.

🤓
 

LanceMac10

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View attachment 335424
?

All jokes aside, upon “taking an inquiring peek” this appears to be my “vote” as well.

🤓



Manual Of Woody Landscape Plants
 

rodeolthr

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My vote is for acer shirasawanum as well.......though there's every possibility that is could be sieboldianum, pseudosieboldianum, or japonicum. For me, all of these do well for bonsai, though they are more "single flush" in their seasonal growth. Often times though I can get a second late season flush.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Regardless of which cultivar the parent is, at best you can figure out the identity to species. By definition, the seedlings will only be of the species. Each seedling will be a unique cultivar.

Do not let the seed get too dry. If your moisture content drops below a point, I think about 70% moisture, the seed will require first a 60 day warm & moist stratification followed by a 60 to 90 day cool and moist stratification.

Immediately put the seed in moist moss, or sand or paper towel. Put the seed in refrigerator. Ideal is a cold refrigerator, between 33 F and 40 F or zero C to +4 C. Some seedlings might sprout a little, if the refrigerator is cool enough, even the sprouted seed will stay fresh for the 5 months of winter many of us are looking at. Plant out in spring in half sun as soon as frost danger passed. Or plant out sprouted seed under lights if you want.

If you let maple seed go dry, you do the warm stratification first. Or plant dry seed outside in July, and following spring it will sprout.

With fresh seed sometimes a few will grow right away without any treatment.
 

RJG2

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Do not let the seed get too dry. If your moisture content drops below a point, I think about 70% moisture, the seed will require first a 60 day warm & moist stratification followed by a 60 to 90 day cool and moist stratification.

Bah, I wish I had known this sooner! I collected a bunch of random seeds this year, and they've been sitting in my basement (50-60% humidity) in paper bags.

I was going to just plant them in seed trays and leave them outside, but the trays were backordered and won't be here for a couple more weeks.

Thanks as always though Leo.
 

hinmo24t

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Regardless of which cultivar the parent is, at best you can figure out the identity to species. By definition, the seedlings will only be of the species. Each seedling will be a unique cultivar.

Do not let the seed get too dry. If your moisture content drops below a point, I think about 70% moisture, the seed will require first a 60 day warm & moist stratification followed by a 60 to 90 day cool and moist stratification.

Immediately put the seed in moist moss, or sand or paper towel. Put the seed in refrigerator. Ideal is a cold refrigerator, between 33 F and 40 F or zero C to +4 C. Some seedlings might sprout a little, if the refrigerator is cool enough, even the sprouted seed will stay fresh for the 5 months of winter many of us are looking at. Plant out in spring in half sun as soon as frost danger passed. Or plant out sprouted seed under lights if you want.

If you let maple seed go dry, you do the warm stratification first. Or plant dry seed outside in July, and following spring it will sprout.

With fresh seed sometimes a few will grow right away without any treatment.

Thanks Leo...took me a few read to understand that but thanks for the level of detail. I think only half these maples were able to dry a bit :( everything is in the fridge now. Hope to get the process going in december to i can get sprouts under lights in feb for a 30 or 60 day jump on spring
 

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