should i repot cuttings into their own pots?

hinmo24t

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looks like i got a handful of cuttings to take, as some of you might have seen (15 out of 40ish)
^hardy outdoor trees

i saw somewhere to repot them into their own small pots but was wondering if its smarter to let them grow in their
prop container thru winter and repot when buds swell next spring?

roots tangling i wasnt too worried about in a years time, but figured there could be other considerations
id see if anyone has input on

also have hibiscus, bougainvillea and citrus cuttings that i was considering leaving in prop container thru winter because they will have to come inside and it will save space (i could separate them and keep them on lunch trays all together if need be
technically just 2 of my 15 hibiscus cuttings are tropical and need to come inside, but theyre with the bougainvillea and could all come in together...the hardy hibiscus luna white could potentially stay outside, together in prop container or not


long term goal is to work with cuttings for a year or two and then sell them as pre-bonsai, differentiation being semi trained as opposed to what youd buy as nursery stock


thanks
 

Pitoon

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I would repot now if you can safely transplant without doing so much damage to the roots. Waiting till next spring the roots will be a tangled mess. Yes, you can separate then but the plants will be stressed producing leaves and roots if you damage the roots at that time.
 

hinmo24t

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I would repot now if you can safely transplant without doing so much damage to the roots. Waiting till next spring the roots will be a tangled mess. Yes, you can separate then but the plants will be stressed producing leaves and roots if you damage the roots at that time.
thanks, i guess i should order 100 4" pots soon
 

hinmo24t

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I just finished potting up some rootstock......it never ends lol.

View attachment 373997
they look great. peach or fruiting tree did i see somewhere else for those?
i havent played w rootstock yet but perhaps i should - seems like they could make for quality/odd shapes suitable to bonsai.
well-played with the square pots, i just order 4" round...going to be tougher/less efficient for trays w the round ones

the frequency rate for me with this hobby is crazy, only a few years into it and i have like 150 trees and plants and many cuttings going lol
its a honest/wholesome hobby - people in the know, like us, can appreciate.
 

Pitoon

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they look great. peach or fruiting tree did i see somewhere else for those?
i havent played w rootstock yet but perhaps i should - seems like they could make for quality/odd shapes suitable to bonsai.
well-played with the square pots, i just order 4" round...going to be tougher/less efficient for trays w the round ones

the frequency rate for me with this hobby is crazy, only a few years into it and i have like 150 trees and plants and many cuttings going lol
its a honest/wholesome hobby - people in the know, like us, can appreciate.
Those in the picture are peach 'Nemaguard'.....320 of those. I have other larger ready for grafting.

The rounds use up to much space, but offer more space for the roots. It's a trade off I suppose. I'm sitting around 1500 plants now, maybe 2000 by end of summer.

Nothing wrong with bonsai or growing plants, it can be addicting though. Every time I see an azalea.......
 

Shibui

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Definitely pot up cuttings when they have roots. It does not seem to matter what time of year, young plants seem to be able to cope with some root damage even if they are active in summer.
Assume the cuttings are in propagating mix of some sort which should have no fertilizer. Plants will suffer from root competition and lack of nutrients if left in the community pot. They will do so much better in individual pots with good potting soil.
 

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