To sift or not to sift....

Do you PERSONALLY sift the soil for your prebonsai?

  • ALWAYS

    Votes: 19 35.8%
  • Sometimes

    Votes: 20 37.7%
  • NEVER

    Votes: 14 26.4%

  • Total voters
    53

wvbonsai

Sapling
Messages
46
Reaction score
0
Location
Huntington, WV
USDA Zone
7
Hey guys. I just wanted to post this little poll to get some honest feedback. Do you sift your soil for prebonsai (1 gal pots or wooden grow boxes)?
 
Messages
189
Reaction score
218
Location
Britanny, France
USDA Zone
9
I always sift the granular part of my substrate, as it is time consuming, I let my slave do it for me.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_1355.JPG
    IMG_1355.JPG
    149.9 KB · Views: 339

darrellw

Mame
Messages
244
Reaction score
1
Location
Vancouver, WA, USA
USDA Zone
8
Yes, I sift. I mostly use recycled substrate for "pre-bonsai" stock (save the soil from repotting of more established trees, sift out the fines).
 

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
Messages
9,221
Reaction score
16,913
Location
Charlotte area, North Carolina
USDA Zone
7B
Depends on the tree and the substrate. If I am using Turface, I always sift the granular portions, and hand mix with the organics. If I am using pre-sifted akadama, or similar, I may just mix it right in with organic.
 

monza

Shohin
Messages
384
Reaction score
6
Location
Alberta, Canada
USDA Zone
3
Turface, granite grit and organic I always do and I really need a better system. I've bought and broken three this summer alone. Have not been able to fine a local source for the right size screen to make one. I must say the cement mixer above is a solid idea, I like it. I'm mostly conifers.
 
Last edited:

mrchips1952

Yamadori
Messages
82
Reaction score
0
Location
Colorado
Sifting

My collection is 90% conifers. I used 1/3 each of pea gravel, turface and fine mulch. I sift only the mulch to that I get the finest particles the rest is right from the bag. Dave in Colorado:D
 

rockm

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
9,684
Reaction score
12,395
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
I stopped sifting soil ingredients long ago. I use relatively uniform largish particles. Sifting can also tend to smash organic ingredients into finer and finer dust...
 

mrchips1952

Yamadori
Messages
82
Reaction score
0
Location
Colorado
I stopped sifting soil ingredients long ago. I use relatively uniform largish particles. Sifting can also tend to smash organic ingredients into finer and finer dust...
It's a very good point you make about sifting and the result is a finer dust which I would think would clog drainage holes, compact and do more damage than good. No more sifting for me.:eek:
 

rockm

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
9,684
Reaction score
12,395
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
I guess it depends on what you're using as the organic component. If you're using composted pine bark mulch or (God fobid) peat moss, it is a big problem. If you're using long-fibered sphagnum moss that's been chopped up, or orchid bark, sifting isn't as much of an issue.
 

Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
Messages
10,974
Reaction score
20,591
Location
North Georgia/lived in MA until 2009
USDA Zone
7b
It's a very good point you make about sifting and the result is a finer dust which I would think would clog drainage holes, compact and do more damage than good. No more sifting for me.:eek:

Your collection of yamadori alpine trees, in my opinion, should be planted in an 100% inorganic soil made up of similarly sized particles. I would sift the soil for those trees every time.
 

Similar threads

Top