torch 'em

koyote1

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Hey folks. I guess I'm not too clear on torching jins or sharis. I first thought it was to add some type of weathered texture. Then I received a response from you all about a jin, and torching was mentioned to ben the branch or twist it. On a side note-if Taghigi could re-read my Larch question, I added some important detail I forgot to mention the 1st time. Also, what's the best way to get the black charr off the branch. I have a Dremel, but the wire brush is too vicious, and a regular brush is not tuff enough.
 

koyote1

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and about torching?

Some info on torching please. Where's Tachigi? He's got all the answers.
 
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koyote1

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Thanks Will. Now I get it. But....can a torch be used to bend a branch or twist it? The sites were helpful. I've read the 1st one before, & the second seems awesome, but not in my language. The pics spoke volumes though.
 

Graydon

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Thanks Will. Now I get it. But....can a torch be used to bend a branch or twist it? The sites were helpful. I've read the 1st one before, & the second seems awesome, but not in my language. The pics spoke volumes though.
Well yes, but the torch is what you use to soften the wood or make it pliable. Like the other thread where I described the process to steam bend a branch and Tachigi followed up with heating and bending right after my post. There are many methods and the best one is the one you can do well and feel comfortable doing. I like the steam bending but I'm a woodworker and steam bend wood on a regular basis.

Once the wood is heated and becomes more pliable you will need a method to keep it in place until it cools and sets. I have used turnbuckles out of bonsai wire to do this. Note that if you have several directional bends needed that this will be a multi step process, doing one after the last has cooled and set. Wait a day, no rushing.

I would like to suggest that you practice this technique not on the tree that you want to work on but instead a branch from another tree. It can be cut off of the tree and nailed to a bench or held in a vise. Better to make mistakes and learn on something else.
 

koyote1

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Great suggestions. I also work w/ wood, from carving to timberframing and everything in between, but never needed to steam anything but wallpaper. I also do tattoos so I really enjoy having my eye a few inches from my work. That's why I really want to get this down pat. I just love deadwood, even by itself.
 

Smoke

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This is also a good site for somthing a little different.

Regards, Al
 

Rick Moquin

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Thanks Will. Now I get it. But....can a torch be used to bend a branch or twist it? The sites were helpful. I've read the 1st one before, & the second seems awesome, but not in my language. The pics spoke volumes though.
Slow down grasshopper and the answer will come.
 

Tachigi

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Koyote, Believe me when I say that I have far more questions than answers. The torch method I elborated on in your other thread was taught to me by Graham Potter a artist from the UK noted for his bonsai carving and wood working. To get the charing off use a brass brush, which is the size of a tooth brush or 180 to 220 grit sand paper. Take note that some darkening of the wood will be desirable when you apply lime sulphur. The combination of the two will produce a very realistic color that represents deadwood in nature. I would strongly suggest you take Graydon's advise and practice on a piece of deadwood first to get a feel for it and what will happen when you do this or that.

I first thought it was to add some type of weathered texture.
This is a true statement and is what using a torch is generally used for, outside of removing the fuzzies after carving. The detour to bending wood came from your desire to have a zig zag branch or a twisting Jin. One last thing a torch will do is on shari and jins is dry them. This will open the grain sooner than what nature would do over time. Giving you a leg up on carving with the flow of the tree.

I am hoping that torching will go farther than what we use it for now. I am currently trying to perfect carving with a oxyacetylene torch which allows the use a very fine flame kernel to carve out wood fiber by fiber (a huge bonus in hollows and hard to reach spots) while giving you all the benefits that fire does in a general weathering application. The detail and results this method will give is absolutely awesome.
 
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irene_b

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Tom,
How about some pictures of the process?
Each step please.
Irene
 

Smoke

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Patience Irene. Tom is still waiting for the Fire Department investigateing team to release the photo's. Very touchy process!

I do await further documentation of this exciting process.

Best regrards, Al
 

Tachigi

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Tom is still waiting for the Fire Department investigateing team to release the photo's
LOL Al......it only sounds bad when you say oxyacetylene torch...well, it looks bad initially when I put on full welders attire :)

The idea behind this is, with welders goggles on you can look directly at the flame and what your burning/cutting. This is not possible with a micro torch as the flame isn't bright enough. You can actually watch each fiber glow red and burn away cleaning the area as you go with bursts of oxygen. Previous areas that were burned/cut, in close proximity, glow red from the carbon build up giving you a type of map and picture of where you have been. With the right tip you can bring the flame kernel down to about 3/16ths of an inch which is many times smaller than a micro torch. Allowing for some precision work. Obviously venting and directing heat is a major concern. However with the right precautions this is easily handled.

Irene, I don't have any pictures per say of the process. Kinda hard to do pictures and wield a torch at the same time. However the big juniper on the Bnut home page shows a hollowed out jin on the lower left hand side of the trunk. This hollow was done with this method when I first started playing with this technique. I am planning to do a piece of wood for a Tanuki in the near future and will do pictures as I go.
 

Tachigi

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I go about burning my trees
If this is indeed a true story then you have my deepest condolences. This however is a a great read :)
 
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If this is indeed a true story then you have my deepest condolences. This however is a a great read :)

Thank you.

I swear that story is just as truthful and honest as every other story in that section, cross my heart. :D


Will
 
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