What should I do? All critics welcome

the3rdon

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I would like some constructive criticism on what to do with this hornbeam. Anybody that has worked with honbeams would be great. How much can I cut back to fix the crazy branching without endangering the tree?
 

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AlainK

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Hornbeam backbuds easily.

In Autumn, I would cut the branch on the right, leaving a 1 cm stub. New buds will develop at the base. Select one that will become the new branch, and let it grow. If you proceed the same way with the top (selecting a new leader), you will have a very vigorous grow.

If you haven't repotted it in the spring, you can then defoliate the new branches in June, then trim them and wire them. They will ramify and you can re-structure it.

Hornbeams are very resilient and it will work if the tree is in a good soil and well cultivated.

The base of the tree is very interesting and it shoukld become a bonsai with character. IMHO.
 

JasonG

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AlainK is right....but if that is to drastic for you then you can cut every thing back to 2 leafs and keep it pinched after that. This will also produce some back budding. But if it were mine I would be ruthless.

THe lower trunk is very cool! This will be a niec tree in due time.

Jason
 

kytombonsai

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I have one in the ground that I purchased from Bill V. at a club meeting about 8 years ago. It was about pencil thickness, I planted it in the ground and every 2 years I cut it back to the trunk. The trunk is now about 4" wide. This year I cut it back and I thought it died. I was ready to pull it out and pitch it into the compost pile when I noticed a few buds on the trunk. I left it alone and it has now budded out from top to bottom. What I'm getting at is that you should be able to cut everything off in the spring and get massive bud back. I don't know if is a good idea to do that now though. The tree does have a nice trunk and would look better with a better branch structure.

Tom
 
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Is this a Korean Hormbeam or a domestic Hornbeam?
 
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Tachigi

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Nice trunk, has lots of movement and interest. I have a problem with the tree that might tear you in two separate directions. On Hornbeams you can prune in the spring and get some great back budding. Your primary branch at this point is begging for that. However, your apex leader at this point is two small for pruning.

You have great taper in the trunk to a old chop point then it bottle necks at the transition to the apex. This I see as a problem with your presentation. Some hard decisions need to be made as to which direction you will take. Do you choose to keep the branch in proportion or fix the trunk which at present has a visual flaw.

If it were me I would put this tree in the ground to speed develop the apex transition, this will take to long in a pot. At present I see this as a serious flaw and would want it corrected first.

My guess is that this tree is a north American type of hornbeam .... leaves look very large for a potted Korean hornbeam.
 

the3rdon

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Thanx guys. I am pretty new to this so thats why I want all the opinion I can get. It helps me learn more about the species. To my knowledge it is Korean Honbeam. I have 5 Kohos and they all have identical leafage. Only the newer unpinched leaves are large. I will take everything in and figure what makes the most sense. Keep the input flyin! I love it!
 

Klytus

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What would i do?

Pinch out the tops of all too long shoots,then pinch back further for shape.

Then leave it to vegitate awhile.
 

head_cutter

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or...some drama?

You also have the beginning of a pretty dramatic windswept tree. I can see it tilted to the right a few inches then styled only to the right--cut back everything going left then potted to the left in a nice shallow oval pot? Give the illusion that it may fall over at any minute? Cutting it back hard for a few seasons should give you very good ramification. I'd also style the branches a little 'heavy' on both length and foliage to make it 'look' like it was in trouble as far as balance.

Bob
 

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