A few pine seeds, 6 years later.

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I tried seedling cuttings this spring and while most of them rooted most of them only rooted on 1 side of the stem. I've made a bunch of other cuttings and it's only the JBP that had this problem.
 

Dav4

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I tried seedling cuttings this spring and while most of them rooted most of them only rooted on 1 side of the stem. I've made a bunch of other cuttings and it's only the JBP that had this problem.
How would you know this without pulling the roots out of the soil?
 

Anthony

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@wsteinhoff ,

I believe it was Osoyoung, who might have explained that technique.
It isn't for the root distribution, it is to get branches as low down on the pine as is possible.

We use the same idea on Tamarind seedlings.
Cut back to 1 or 1/2 inch under the cotyledons.
You can grow Tamarinds with extremely low branches and use them for mame' or smaller.
Tamarinds in nature only gain exposed roots by erosion, they have an unusual development
that comes with age where the trunk expands outwards.

All the J.B.pines we grew from seed are developing their radials naturally, needing little encouragement
for the eagle's claw feature.
Soil mix is 80 to 90 % 5 mm inorganic [ silica based gravel ] by volume.
I mention that just on case it is a reaction to the growing medium, that brings about what I wrote
before.
Oldest from seed, about 28 /29 years, source of seed, Japan.
Good Day
Anthony
 
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How would you know this without pulling the roots out of the soil?
My tray of cuttings was knocked over and the top layer of soil spilled out of a lot of the cups that they're in. It didn't look like any roots broke off just more like there never were any there. I didn't go yanking them out of the soil, that would've broken roots off for sure.
 

Dav4

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My tray of cuttings was knocked over and the top layer of soil spilled out of a lot of the cups that they're in. It didn't look like any roots broke off just more like there never were any there. I didn't go yanking them out of the soil, that would've broken roots off for sure.
Ok, good to know you weren't yanking them out of the soil as that's a bit counterproductive to root growth. I suspect if you're able to rotate the cutting periodically, you'll get more uniform root spread. I've got my first tray of cuttings growing this year we'll see what they look like next winter.
 
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Ok, good to know you weren't yanking them out of the soil as that's a bit counterproductive to root growth. I suspect if you're able to rotate the cutting periodically, you'll get more uniform root spread. I've got my first tray of cuttings growing this year we'll see what they look like next winter.
What do you mean by "rotate the cutting"? I don't quite see how you mean and how that'll affect the root spread. I hope yours turn out better. I get that the primary reason for seedling cuttings is to get that first node lower but you still want that good root spread too.
 

Dav4

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What do you mean by "rotate the cutting"? I don't quite see how you mean and how that'll affect the root spread. I hope yours turn out better. I get that the primary reason for seedling cuttings is to get that first node lower but you still want that good root spread too.
Rotate the containers with the planted cuttings in relationship to the sun. The side facing the sun always grows better so periodic rotation should make the cutting grow more evenly on all sides.
 
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Rotate the containers with the planted cuttings in relationship to the sun. The side facing the sun always grows better so periodic rotation should make the cutting grow more evenly on all sides.
Ok, I figured that must've been what you meant. Now that I think about it though I did them late winter so they would've been under grow lights so the light was directly above the cuttings rather than on one side.
 

Adair M

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I tried seedling cuttings this spring and while most of them rooted most of them only rooted on 1 side of the stem. I've made a bunch of other cuttings and it's only the JBP that had this problem.
Did you cut them straight across using a razor blade?
 
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Can pine seedlings be transplanted this late with root pruning? I head from somebody reputable that they can be transplanted right now if they are seedlings and protected after long roots are cut leaving new tips obviously. I have always been very conservative but this year I'm running out of room for flats and want to get them individually potted. I've only transplanted during spring in order to not lose any but I wonder if that precaution is just as true for young pine tissue that seems to behave differently.
 

Dav4

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Can pine seedlings be transplanted this late with root pruning? I head from somebody reputable that they can be transplanted right now if they are seedlings and protected after long roots are cut leaving new tips obviously. I have always been very conservative but this year I'm running out of room for flats and want to get them individually potted. I've only transplanted during spring in order to not lose any but I wonder if that precaution is just as true for young pine tissue that seems to behave differently.
I'd say so... I made some cuttings just a few weeks ago and they'll have new roots by fall so why wouldn't a root pruned seedling not... your mileage may vary, though;).
 
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I'd say so... I made some cuttings just a few weeks ago and they'll have new roots by fall so why wouldn't a root pruned seedling not... your mileage may vary, though;).
over thinking that's why!
I had some fail years ago that I pruned but it must have been watering and soil, thanks!
 

my nellie

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Hello!
Hello sorry to chime in uninvited but a bonsai professional here where I live has succeeded in JBP cuttings aswell.. i
I've seen some but never got around asking how he's done it.. will do when I see him again
Did you happen to meet the said professional and get more information about his techniques, if I may ask?
Thank you.
 

my nellie

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Thanks for the clarification @0soyoung
But I think @Shun doesn't have in mind Mr. Comstock because he/she says : "a bonsai professional here" and he/she is in Brazil...
And I am under the impression that the poster is not referring to seedling cuttings but either softwood or hardwood J.B.P cuttings (post #220)
 

0soyoung

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Thanks for the clarification @0soyoung
But I think @Shun doesn't have in mind Mr. Comstock because he/she says : "a bonsai professional here" and he/she is in Brazil...
And I am under the impression that the poster is not referring to seedling cuttings but either softwood or hardwood J.B.P cuttings (post #220)
:oops:


Note to self: quit being a know-it-all busy body! :mad:
 

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