A few pine seeds, 6 years later.

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a few more.

Another exposed root:
Sept 2014 Edit - This tree is discussed in a post on my blog here:
http://www.phutu.com/?p=79



Another, this one might end up being one of the best, the roots are already nice and fat and they twist around each other neatly


A fat little informal upright, trunk is only about 1.5" now but the sacrifice is growing nice and low and the finished branches are developing well also. The top will have to be grown up in the next few years.


Root over rock - the other side might be better, only the next few years will tell. The finished branches are wired but the sacrifice branch is still growing up. I cut most of the sacrifice branches back on these this past fall because the wind kept knocking them over but I only cut off one years growth so there's still plenty up there to fatten the trunk:


Informal upright - this one had the roots buried so I had to remove some of the soil so they'll start to form bark. This will be one of the larger trees and likely ends up at 16-20" finished height so the trunk will have to fatten for at least 4-5 more years before the lead is removed.


Formal upright - the only one out of the entire batch that I'm trying to make formal. The front is probably about 20 or 30 degrees to the right of where the photo was taken. To get the taper without the chop interfering you bend the leader over to the back and promote a small side bud upward. The bend here was made three years ago and the leader has grown quickly while the small but has grown quite slowly. When the leader is removed the nodes on the new trunk will be nice and close together allowing form more branches without grafting.


Root over rock shohin - the roots have gripped the rock well and I'm hoping that they start to go flat over it before I remove the leader.


The largest trunk that I have is about 2 inches across with about a 6-inch root spread, this will probably end up a slant style but it needs a few years yet. The first chop will be just beyond the visible foliage. Coincidentally - I think this is the largest because it was the first that I put into the larger baskets by a year.
If understanding correctly trees are now 10 years. Very great work you have done:D. Appreciate wire scars on at least small Cascade. Character additions to cultivated trees always good. Working on about 11 seedlings of deciduous for personal collection. Believe all were volunteers:cool:. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 2017.
 
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Eric or Others, has anyone ever tried or had any luck with doing the seedling cutting technique on 1 year old seedlings (meaning after their first year of growth and a winter)? I decided to try it out to see if I had any luck. Some things I noticed since I was growing in a raised bed was many of the roots off the tap root were very low due to the top of the beds more often drying out and no one watered the beds, they just got rain naturally. I wasn't sure whether it would be better to cut up high or down low since the trunk had already ligified deep into the soil. Here are a few photos I took of the process. I'll give an update if anything happens to survive :)


I took these out just as the candles were beginning to swell and start to grow

Here are what the roots typically looked like. As I mentions I cut some closer to the needles and some closer where the roots began

Trying my best to do it the same way Jonas's blogs show (with the exception of them being a year old already)


After potting a few up. I took them inside where I will keep them in indirect sunlight and mist them on occasion. Crossing my fingers for some survivors.

Edit* Those pictured are JBP... I also did a few JRP
 
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It may work but the method of doing this with emerging seedling is to take advantage of what the cotyledons do naturally and that is make a tree that can survive and sustain itself in its environment. This does not mean this will not work, just a bit difficult.
 

0soyoung

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It may work but the method of doing this with emerging seedling is to take advantage of what the cotyledons do naturally and that is make a tree that can survive and sustain itself in its environment. This does not mean this will not work, just a bit difficult.
Pines are gymnosperms which do not have cotyledons, only angiosperms have them.

I've always assumed that even if the mortality rate is equal, one hasn't wasted a year of cultivation in taking the loss if it is done in the first year. However, like I think you are indicating, Vance, I suspect mortality is higher on second year plants.
 
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Osoyoung wrote: Pines are gymnosperms which do not have cotyledons, only angiosperms have them. Technically that may be true but what do you call the needle like protuberances that emerge from the seed that form a hub for the emergence of the tree? It is these quasi-needles that function as cotyledons in Pines and when these are gone it's all a new ball game.

I think you are mistaken. Look at the following fragment from wikpedia.

seedlings also have cotyledons, and these are often variable in number (multicotyledonous), with from 2 to 24 cotyledons forming a whorl at the top of the hypocotyl (the embryonic stem) surrounding the plumule. Within each species, there is often still some variation in cotyledon numbers, e.g.
 
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Eric Group

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Eric or Others, has anyone ever tried or had any luck with doing the seedling cutting technique on 1 year old seedlings (meaning after their first year of growth and a winter)? I decided to try it out to see if I had any luck. Some things I noticed since I was growing in a raised bed was many of the roots off the tap root were very low due to the top of the beds more often drying out and no one watered the beds, they just got rain naturally. I wasn't sure whether it would be better to cut up high or down low since the trunk had already ligified deep into the soil. Here are a few photos I took of the process. I'll give an update if anything happens to survive :)


I took these out just as the candles were beginning to swell and start to grow

Here are what the roots typically looked like. As I mentions I cut some closer to the needles and some closer where the roots began

Trying my best to do it the same way Jonas's blogs show (with the exception of them being a year old already)


After potting a few up. I took them inside where I will keep them in indirect sunlight and mist them on occasion. Crossing my fingers for some survivors.

Edit* Those pictured are JBP... I also did a few JRP
I sure hope you didn't do this with all of them?

Not likely to work... anything is possible I guess! Good luck!
 
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I sure hope you didn't do this with all of them?

Not likely to work... anything is possible I guess! Good luck!
Nope just 20-30 of them. I still had lots more in the grow bed. They're just growing to close together because so many and I need to thin them out.
 

Anthony

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Sidesunny,

probably have to treat them as hardwood cuttings.We can get 1 out 5 or so as hardwood cutiings, and use a rooting
powder.
However we leave the cuttings in more or less full sun. Seems to stimulate.
Shade ended up with all dead -------------- no energy for life ?
Good Luck.

Good Day
Anthony
 

Eric Group

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Sidesunny,

probably have to treat them as hardwood cuttings.We can get 1 out 5 or so as hardwood cutiings, and use a rooting
powder.
However we leave the cuttings in more or less full sun. Seems to stimulate.
Shade ended up with all dead -------------- no energy for life ?
Good Luck.

Good Day
Anthony
You are still the only one I know who gets JBP cuttings to root.
Can you give me a walk through one more time please?

What age is the growth approximately? Is it like 1-2 year old growth? Older?..

What do you use for your substrate?

What time of year? I know you don't have such dramatic climate change where you are but, just curious what the weather is like or if you do them at a specific time in the growing cycle?

Thanks!
 
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From the descriptions in Bonsai Today when this method was first described this process involved doing the seedlings right after the cotyledons had poped off the spent seed. These it a line between the new stem and the new roots that is clearly visible, you cut right below that point, dip in rooting hormone and plant in pure sand. The tree will regenerate itself from the energy and hormonal instructions in the cotyledons. It isn't so much the time of year it is the time in the cycle of the emerging seedlings.
 

Anthony

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Eric,

firstly, the pots are styro food containers, about 3 " deep. Secondly, the soil mix is a commercial peat moss perlite mix,
coming out of Canada to which we add on average about 1/4 by volume 5 mm silica based builder's gravel..

We clip all year long. Cuttings are left to soak in water until time for dipping in a basic rooting powder for hardwood cuttings.

Take out of the water, shake to remove extra water, dip in rooting powder [ Rootex-4 from Jordan ] . The soil is pre-moistened
and holes are made with a bamboo skewer.
After sticking water is applied again to settle the soil.

Placement is full sun ---------- please note 1 in 5 cuttings will take. But we have about 6 to 10 of these containers at anytime.
With about as many as 10 cuttings stuck in it.
Watering is like a tree, 3 times a day, by watering can.

The cutting is brown of bark, and about 3 to 5 mm in thickness. We will however stick anything just to see.

Re-reading at AUSbonsai, it was realised that the guy was using recently sprouted shoots on branches to
do his cuttings. Looked like 100 % rootings.

Did I leave out anything you need to know, or confuse a step ?
Good Day
Anthony








100
 

Eric Group

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Eric,

firstly, the pots are styro food containers, about 3 " deep. Secondly, the soil mix is a commercial peat moss perlite mix,
coming out of Canada to which we add on average about 1/4 by volume 5 mm silica based builder's gravel..

We clip all year long. Cuttings are left to soak in water until time for dipping in a basic rooting powder for hardwood cuttings.

Take out of the water, shake to remove extra water, dip in rooting powder [ Rootex-4 from Jordan ] . The soil is pre-moistened
and holes are made with a bamboo skewer.
After sticking water is applied again to settle the soil.

Placement is full sun ---------- please note 1 in 5 cuttings will take. But we have about 6 to 10 of these containers at anytime.
With about as many as 10 cuttings stuck in it.
Watering is like a tree, 3 times a day, by watering can.

The cutting is brown of bark, and about 3 to 5 mm in thickness. We will however stick anything just to see.

Re-reading at AUSbonsai, it was realised that the guy was using recently sprouted shoots on branches to
do his cuttings. Looked like 100 % rootings.

Did I leave out anything you need to know, or confuse a step ?
Good Day
Anthony








100
Dry detailed, thank you for taking the time Anthony! I am all about trying to get some to root, so I am going to give some a try this year again!
 
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The articles i read (aus forum) describes using juvenile foliage. It is not the young growth of an older pine but the soft and not mature looking foliage of a young (1 and 2 years old) pine. He cuts the growing tip in summer of the first or second year depending on the vigour to produce backbudding. The clippings he used to take cuttings. When the shoot is long enough he takes 1 to 3 peaces from one shoot. Long growing season needed i guess... Must try it some day.
 
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Thanks to Adair for posting some shots in my absence. Here are a few more. These are all the same batch, and you can find earlier pictures back in the old posts. Many from this batch still have secondary sacrifice branches on them. A bunch of them are at Jonas' place at the moment.

Enjoy!







 

milehigh_7

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Thanks to Adair for posting some shots in my absence. Here are a few more. These are all the same batch, and you can find earlier pictures back in the old posts. Many from this batch still have secondary sacrifice branches on them. A bunch of them are at Jonas' place at the moment.

Enjoy!
Wow wow wow! What an amazing job you have done over the years we have been watching these! It's good to see you posting as well!
 

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