Blaauw Juniper

Rick Moquin

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This is a juni I acquired last year at a steal ($35 Cd) from a local nursery (pic 1). I purchased it for the trunk girth (over 3"), dramatic taper (pic 3) and low branching. This tree was grown in a crowded condition or was never rotated as the growth was one sided (pic 2). The nebari is nearly 360 degrees so that should not present a problem in the future. I got rid of all unnecessary branching, planted in a grow box and left to recuperate for the next couple of years. Alot of these branches will not form part of the future tree, they were left there for growth purposes.
 

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Rick Moquin

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... a year later, under Persiano's suprefeeding program, it has come along quite nicely. Albeit I didn't foresee working on this tree for another 3-5 years, I believe with this seasons growth preliminary styling may commence as soon as next summer, the summer of '09 at the latest.

So I post pics at various angles and although I have an idea where I want to go with this tree, I am seeking your expert opinions on possible ways ahead.
 

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Rick Moquin

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last but not least.

In providing feedback and future "fronts" for this tree, can you explain why. As mentioned the nebari does not play a role in front selection, therefore feel free to chose one that suits this tree the best. Thanks in advance...
 

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As to fronts, I like your first and eighth images for the movement shown. My first choice is your first. Not only will it have good movement, I think it shows the most potential for jin and shari. I would not do any styling with it in the box, though, I would repot into a training pot and make my final styling plan at that time.
 

JasonG

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Hey Rick,

This little guy has some potential and a good learning tree.... I think I like picture #7 the best as the front. You still capture some of the movement and stubs for jins. The jins won't be in your face with this angle but will still be there just not as strong. I also choose this front because of the little branch I circled in yellow that has potential to be a good future leader. It looks lush with growth and will make a nice compact apex with a few more years growth.

Where I tend to disagree with Chris is I would work on it now. If it were my tree I would start by wiring some movement into the branches and future apex, doing deadwood work and again IF it were mine I would try to make it look crediable from multipule sides not just one front. But that is me, I tend to like trees that are good from all angles....

Anyways that is my 2 cents worth :)
 

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Jay Wilson

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Rick,
I certianly can't give any expert opinion on styling this tree but it seems that you're getting some good opinions anyway. I do tend to like #7 and Jasons ideas though.
It's good to see someone else using guy wires...

Thanks for sharing!

Jay
 

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Hey, Rick! I recall seeing your pic #3 of this tree before, so it's nice to see how it has grown out and to see the various angles. I liked my first view of this tree, but like it even more now that you've shown some possibilities. I'm basically in agreement with the others here, though I can't pin down my favorite angle quite as easily. Keep us posted as it develops. Thanks.

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Tachigi

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Rick, Beautiful! Kinda hard to give suggestions when the nebari is covered by boards and weeds ;). However 1352 and 1358 seem like good canidates for fronts some interesting movement there. I reserve the right to change my mind though when you expose the base :)
 

Rick Moquin

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Thanks for the insight folks.

Tom, the attached photos were the original. I understand that the nebari may assist you in your deliberations. However, with the exception of adding an inch or so to the trunk length, the nebari is fine feeder roots that I will be able to flare out in subsequent years. There are no "major" roots to worry about, if I recall correctly.
 

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Rick Moquin

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As to fronts, I like your first and eighth images for the movement shown. My first choice is your first. Not only will it have good movement, I think it shows the most potential for jin and shari. I would not do any styling with it in the box, though, I would repot into a training pot and make my final styling plan at that time.
That's what I thought also last year. I was going to wait until it provided me with some beack budding and hence more options. The jin and shari work will indeed be extensive on this tree. Wrt the training pot, that's the third recommendation I have received. I need to think about that one.

The energy on this tree is apically concentrated. Although I got a profusion of back budding last year where all the cuts were made, the energy is top heavy.

I believe giving it a chop and reducing the branch length further will induce back budding by re-directing some of that apical energy.
 

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Rick Moquin

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I think I like picture #7 the best as the front. You still capture some of the movement and stubs for jins. The jins won't be in your face with this angle but will still be there just not as strong.
THat is indeed something I have been toying with Jason.
Where I tend to disagree with Chris is I would work on it now. If it were my tree I would start by wiring some movement into the branches and future apex, doing deadwood work
Although ti seems lush, it is not ready to be worked on yet. All the major branches you see on the tree with the exception of your circled one will nto be there in the future. Therefore wiring is not critical at this time, as a reduction in length would be more appropriate for the time being.

The jin and shari work, could be done, but then again I have alot of new growth all around those areas that render that decision difficult until I can find a direcxtion to take this puppy.

IF it were mine I would try to make it look crediable from multipule sides not just one front. But that is me, I tend to like trees that are good from all angles....
this is something I have also picked up from Walter and I endeavour to do just that with all my trees. In the end though, I don't have Walters talent and until such time as I perfect my craft, we will have to settle on a single front for the time being, while keeping in mind the crdibility of the other views.
 

Rick Moquin

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Having taken the advise of many under advisement, I went ahead and potted it up. The pot is a 12x10x3 Tokoname Flame Pot.

The branches have been reduced as much as I dare, and top has been chopped off. This should promote new budding. The tree is still a little tall but will remain as such for a future jinning of the top. As mentioned the roots are all fine feeder roots which necessitated anchoring the tree to the pot with wire and brass screws as that was the only way to secure the tree in the pot. You will notice the flare at the base of the tree (covered in soil) for the time being. I plan on letting the soil errode over time, allowing the roots exposure to harden off.
 

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Rick Moquin

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the final angles and the last being a close up of the anchoring and nebari. Proportion wise I believe this pot is a perfect match! What say you??
 

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grouper52

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Rick, where'd you get that beautiful pot!? :)

Does the bark of this juniper take on the red color that shimpaku does when manicured? - if so, it might match well with the red of the pot's flames. A subtle wavy shape to any future branches, jins and sharis may also resonate well in the future. The proportions look pleasing to me, especially if I imagine the tree a bit more grown out. I'd be curious to know the opinion of others who are more experienced with pot selection, though.

grouper52
 

Smoke

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Looks like a Shigaraki pot....
 

Tachigi

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Rick nice pot and tree combo. I have one question. Since junipers don't heal (callous over) over damaged wood and in fact retreat from it much of the time. Do the anchor screws make you at all apprehensive? I've seen this technique done on deciduous trees and anchors put in conifer deadwood, but never on live conifer tissue ...really curious about this.
 

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Rick, where'd you get that beautiful pot!? :)

grouper52
Tokoname crackle/flame pot. Nice, I love them. They don't make them anymore. Bonsai Monk has a few on the back room shelves... I think.

I saw someone win one of these at the BSF last month in a $5 raffle on the last day. He stopped by the Bonsai Monk booth and we looked up the price, close to $250. That was a score.
 

grouper52

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Tokoname crackle/flame pot. Nice, I love them. They don't make them anymore. Bonsai Monk has a few on the back room shelves... I think.

I saw someone win one of these at the BSF last month in a $5 raffle on the last day. He stopped by the Bonsai Monk booth and we looked up the price, close to $250. That was a score.
Rick,

Should we tell them? ;)

grouper52
 

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