Fungus, please help

mapleX

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Hello, I refer to your experiences in the search to discover what is the problem in my JM.

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The tree was transplanted to a cultivation pot from a nursery plant at the end of last winter, it had an excellent start to budding and by the summer it began to show this dieback on the trunk (not branches) from above where the drastic formation cut was. (the specimen measured 3 meters and its height was reduced to 1 meter) downwards. Then I made a cut under the affected part and I found those spots inside the wood.

Regressive death is from the top (apex) down which makes me think it is not verticillium.

Thank you very much for the help!!
 

mapleX

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Could be verticillium wilt. Shows as vascular streaking similar to that.
The symptoms do not match, this begins in the middle of summer with temperatures. above 100 ° F, disease progression is from above, etc.
 

mapleX

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The symptoms do not match, this begins in the middle of summer with temperatures. above 100 ° F, disease progression is from above, etc.
And I add the data, don't have black at the soil level.
 

0soyoung

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Psedomonas syringae is 'renowned' for entering pruning wounds that were made during rainy times. Many growers in my area advise to never prune if rain is forecast to occur within 3 days of the time of pruning. Psedomonas is a bacterium that is also known to pose as a nucleation center for the crystallization of water in winter and thereby finds it way into a tree's cambium. Antibiotics are reported to be a remedy for an existing infection, though simply removing the infected tissue is the most commonly employed method. Copper-based fungicides are effective only prophylactically

Nectria canker is another possibility. If so, you'll be seeing little orange fruiting bodies sometime in the next month. It is commonly spread by pruning/sawing using a cutting tool that was just (possibly unwittingly) employed to cut infected tissue. This commonly happens in garden center nurseries, in my experience (then one unwittingly buys an infected tree and casually spreads it by failing to sanitize the tool before/after each use). Nectria primarily infects cambium/phloem, but also gets into the xylem and thereby causes foliar symptoms similar to verticillium. I've managed to save a couple of landscape plantings by cauterizing the area exhibiting fruiting bodies and surrounding. That is, I used a butane blow torch.
 

mapleX

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Psedomonas syringae is 'renowned' for entering pruning wounds that were made during rainy times. Many growers in my area advise to never prune if rain is forecast to occur within 3 days of the time of pruning. Psedomonas is a bacterium that is also known to pose as a nucleation center for the crystallization of water in winter and thereby finds it way into a tree's cambium. Antibiotics are reported to be a remedy for an existing infection, though simply removing the infected tissue is the most commonly employed method. Copper-based fungicides are effective only prophylactically
Thank you Osoyoung, with Pseudomonas syringae, what chemical action could you take to stop the advance at this time?
 

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