Ginkgo Biloba

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Location
Richmond, VA
USDA Zone
7a
#42
Usually yes, late winter, or really right as the tree is coming out of dormancy. But there's a lot of "it depends" and "maybes."

It's a lot of understanding how plants grow and using their natural growth cycles to help achieve specific results, depending on what stage of bonsai you're growing. It's a very indepth hobby (read obession :eek:) but can be very enjoyable for the beginner.

I would say most of the people on this site are very passionate about bonsai and plants in general and are always willing to help, even with non bonsai plants.
 
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Location
Richmond, VA
USDA Zone
7a
#43
For bonsai or nursery stock? Sorry, I don't order plants off the internet but a lot of people here do.

I noticed your maple in the background and stopped myself from suggesting you chop it down for bonsai
 
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#44
For bonsai or nursery stock? Sorry, I don't order plants off the internet but a lot of people here do.

I noticed your maple in the background and stopped myself from suggesting you chop it down for bonsai
that's the only tree I get complimented on .... :( I'm "trying" to air layer this tree
 
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#46
Yeah cause you haven't got your ginkgo to ass kicking status yet, but you're going to work on that this year!
I'm crossing my fingers. I'm also trying to air layer my Black Japanese maple and I noticed it has seeds today.
 
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Richmond, VA
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7a
#47
Those seeds won't be ready until they fall from the tree and they rarely come true to type from seed, but fun nonetheless to play with.

I say try your hand at an air layer. Some Japanese maples can be tricky to air layer and some won't even work. I have a 'blood good' that I'm trying to air layer and it will be 2 years in June since I first girdled it. Last summer it finally put out one root, and I looked a couple days ago and the bag had a lot more but they looked kind of rotten so we'll see...
 
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#48
Those seeds won't be ready until they fall from the tree and they rarely come true to type from seed, but fun nonetheless to play with.

I say try your hand at an air layer. Some Japanese maples can be tricky to air layer and some won't even work. I have a 'blood good' that I'm trying to air layer and it will be 2 years in June since I first girdled it. Last summer it finally put out one root, and I looked a couple days ago and the bag had a lot more but they looked kind of rotten so we'll see...
I'll keep you guys posted on what happens to mine. I'm curious about the outcome too. I have read that about seeds
 
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#49
Again, thank you all for your import. I'll stop in and give everyone updates and of course to learn more. I'm an armature but I am trying
 
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Location
Orem, UT
USDA Zone
5
#52
@plant_dr
Yeah I tried asking that question a few times but never got a response.
It was just a deduction based on the fact that his Japanese maple is doing so well and the ginkgo isn't. Having a significant part of its vascular system disrupted doesn't help either. I'm guessing the cat damage has been going on for quite awhile in order to leave a bare spot like that. That could stunt the growth a bit. I agree it could be a dwarf as well.
 
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Location
Orem, UT
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#53
Looking at the first pictures more I can tell the tree has grown a bit around the damaged area. If you can keep it protected, the tree shouId continue to heal that spot. It will take a long time I'm sure but it will be ok.
 
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#54
@plant_dr
I thought I saw some lichen on the bark which could indicate some shade but after talking to the OP I'm thinking it's more than likely struggling for water during the growing season. Oaks are notorious for sucking up moisture from the soil and coupled with their hot climate, the ginkgo is probably stressed, but the potential lack of light could also be an issue. The tree is in a zone 9 climate too which doesn't help, I bet by the end of the summer the leaves are usually a chartreuse color which would indicate too much sun/not enough moisture.

It's funny because the OP originally was asking about the cat damage, but we were all basically focused on the fact that it was only 6-8' after 13 years in the ground. I forgot to mention that the damage was probably only secondary to the other main issue of stunted growth. I agree though, the damage is probably not a big issue and the tree will keep growing despite it.

I also noticed some tip die back, which is probably a root issue (probably from the soil staying too dry), because I doubt there is any significant cold desiccating wind to damage the stems.
 
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#55
@plant_dr
I thought I saw some lichen on the bark which could indicate some shade but after talking to the OP I'm thinking it's more than likely struggling for water during the growing season. Oaks are notorious for sucking up moisture from the soil and coupled with their hot climate, the ginkgo is probably stressed, but the potential lack of light could also be an issue. The tree is in a zone 9 climate too which doesn't help, I bet by the end of the summer the leaves are usually a chartreuse color which would indicate too much sun/not enough moisture.

It's funny because the OP originally was asking about the cat damage, but we were all basically focused on the fact that it was only 6-8' after 13 years in the ground. I forgot to mention that the damage was probably only secondary to the other main issue of stunted growth. I agree though, the damage is probably not a big issue and the tree will keep growing despite it.

I also noticed some tip die back, which is probably a root issue (probably from the soil staying too dry), because I doubt there is any significant cold desiccating wind to damage the stems.
I did look up cultivators and I agree, I might have purchased a small ginkgo tree or my soil is too alkaline.
The disadvantage of male Ginkgo Biloba trees is that they are highly allergenic. They have an OPALS allergy scale rating of 7 (out of 10), whereas female trees, which can produce no pollen, have an OPALS allergy scale rating of 2.
Where it occurs in the wild, it is found infrequently in deciduous forests and valleys on acidic loess (i.e. fine, silty soil) with good drainage. The soil it inhabits is typically in the pH range of 5.0 to 5.5.
In many areas of China, it has been long cultivated, and it is common in the southern third of the country. It has also been commonly cultivated in North America for over 200 years and in Europe for close to 300, but during that time, it has never become significantly naturalized.(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginkgo_biloba) Even though, neutralizing acidic forest soils boosts tree growth, causes spike in nitrogen export (https://phys.org/news/2016-06-neutralizing-acidic-forest-soils-boosts.html). I also have hard water which probably raises the alkalinity of my soil.
I just read that I had to wait for my Japanese Maples seeds to fall before they would germinate ? Son of a *****, I plucked ALLOT of seeds from my Japanese maple tree last week !
I also wanted to tell everyone thank you for all the advise
 
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Location
Slovakia, Central Europe
USDA Zone
8?
#56
Maybe a bit late to chime in but: I have a gingko tree that was grown from pencil size specimen my wife gave me like 12 years ago. When we moved to our new house 10 years ago I planted it to the ground. My dog found it and chewed all of it to the ground. I already said good bye to it and after few days was going to dig the remains up. What I found was that the roots were pushing new buds. So I left it there. Now after 10 years the tree is like 4meters tall and doing fantastic.

So my advise: even if the top of the tree didn't make just wait some - it might push new growth from roots. In such case it might be a good candidate for typical gingko bonsai - thick base growing shoots from it.
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
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Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
#57
I dont know how I missed this 12 day thread!

These trees survived the Saber-toothed Tiger and all that shit...

No way them lil pussies are hurting this tree!

Get one of them gater tree watering bags to keep water around the base...maybe even remove some of the grass first....

I garauntee that grass, in Texas, is using most of the water.

Kill some around a ring, mulch it, and plant some ... Capture+_2018-04-16-04-12-40.png

Welcome to Crazy! Crazy delayed!

Sorce
 
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#58
Those seeds won't be ready until they fall from the tree and they rarely come true to type from seed, but fun nonetheless to play with.

I say try your hand at an air layer. Some Japanese maples can be tricky to air layer and some won't even work. I have a 'blood good' that I'm trying to air layer and it will be 2 years in June since I first girdled it. Last summer it finally put out one root, and I looked a couple days ago and the bag had a lot more but they looked kind of rotten so we'll see...
what happens if I plucked the seeds and refrigerated them?
 
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#59
I dont know how I missed this 12 day thread!

These trees survived the Saber-toothed Tiger and all that shit...

No way them lil pussies are hurting this tree!

Get one of them gater tree watering bags to keep water around the base...maybe even remove some of the grass first....

I garauntee that grass, in Texas, is using most of the water.

Kill some around a ring, mulch it, and plant some ... View attachment 187170

Welcome to Crazy! Crazy delayed!

Sorce
that is a good idea.. thank you for telling me about the gator bag
 
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#60
Maybe a bit late to chime in but: I have a gingko tree that was grown from pencil size specimen my wife gave me like 12 years ago. When we moved to our new house 10 years ago I planted it to the ground. My dog found it and chewed all of it to the ground. I already said good bye to it and after few days was going to dig the remains up. What I found was that the roots were pushing new buds. So I left it there. Now after 10 years the tree is like 4meters tall and doing fantastic.

So my advise: even if the top of the tree didn't make just wait some - it might push new growth from roots. In such case it might be a good candidate for typical gingko bonsai - thick base growing shoots from it.
You are not too late.. interesting how your tree grew back. but what area of the USA do you live in?