Growing in the Midwest

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Hello all!
I just got my first Juniper Bonsai this summer and I am slowing figuring it out. I am thinking ahead to the winter time and I have a few questions. I live in the Midwest where it drops to the 20’s and 10’s fahrenheit often. I know that Junipers love to be outside and they need to be out in the winter for their dormant season...but when do I bring it in? When is too cold? How will that affect the watering schedule?
 

Carol 83

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Where in the Midwest? Please add your approximate location to your profile to get the best advice for your climate. I have mostly tropical/subtropicals with the exception of some azaleas, so would be interested in the advice you receive. My husband decided we needed a little juniper, while on vacation a few weeks ago and I am in need of some care advice also. Welcome to the site!
 

Hartinez

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What type of juniper is it? Also, please fill out your profile more that details where you live with the attributed hardiness zone. People can give you much more detailed answers. Figure out a way to not bring it in. Find a good spot for it to go dormant outside.
 
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What type of juniper is it? Also, please fill out your profile more that details where you live with the attributed hardiness zone. People can give you much more detailed answers. Figure out a way to not bring it in. Find a good spot for it to go dormant outside.
I did that! Sorry I am new to the site. I’m in a 6a zone.
 

Deep Sea Diver

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Welcome aboard to BNut! We hope you have a great time meeting folks here and learning how to create a really nice bonsai.

It seems that your juniper could winter over in fine shape if you dig it in the ground in a place where it is shielded from the wind.

The procedure I use here is:

Dig a hole in an appropriate spot, mine is in well draining soil under the tall rhodies on the north side of the house which is in the prevailing wind shadow here, but receives at least 1/2 day sun.….​
Place a layer of bark nuggets or such underneath to ensure good drainage.​
Bury the pot so the soil surface is just under the lip of the pot.​
Pack the soil around the pot in place just enough to avoid run off.​
Then put a nice layer, perhaps 2” of sifted bark nuggets over the top of the pot and let it overflow about 4” around the pot to ensure everything is snuggled down.​
Water as needed, especially the day before the first few frosts.​
Spray 2-3 times with copper fungicide during the winter. Others would recommend other products.​
This is likely a bit of overkill, but I have never lost a tree, fingers crossed, for the past four winters.

I do use a cold frame for some other trees, but not for conifer types, maples, hawthorns, crabapples and a couple others. Azaleas, yearlings, and other cold sensitive trees go in the cold frames.

Good luck and Welcome Aboard once again. I look forward to seeing your future posts.

cheers
DSD sends
 

sorce

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Welcome to Crazy!

Sorce
 

Underdog

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My D trees under the bench in mulch. Evergreens in the garden packed in leaves. There is debate whether evergreens need or like some sun in winter. Then pack up your tropicals and go to Florida... LOL
 

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Leo in N E Illinois

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I'm in zone 5b. My junipers stay outside all winter. The type and value of the pot determines how they get handled. Junipers in plastic pots just get set on the ground, roughly the same light they grew in all summer.

If the juniper is in a clay pot that will not survive freeze-thaw cycling, it gets wintered in a unheated well house. If the pot is high fired, and has a shape that is wider at the top than the bottom, then I just set the juniper on the ground for the winter.

Cheap Chinese pots usually break with freeze-thaw cycling. Japanese pots and better American made pots usually have no problems.
 

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