Hokkaido Elm

Brian Underwood

Chumono
Messages
930
Reaction score
201
Location
Santa Rosa, CA
I have had this Hokkaido Elm for a few years now, and have been slowly bringing the branches down with guy-wires. It needed a new pot this year, and low and behold the branches sprung back from the guy wires. Everyone who has ever had one of these trees has told me "They are impossible to wire!" Well, that is almost true. I only wired 5 branches, one of which broke right in two. So, they are 20% impossible to wire. The branches are extremely brittle, but the twiggy structure, and the smallest leaves of all the elms make it irresistible for bonsai. It is potted in a very unique pot from North Eagle Pottery of Sonoma County. Ready to show this year?
 

Attachments

  • elm 2-20-11.jpg
    elm 2-20-11.jpg
    153.3 KB · Views: 269

serpentsgarden

Sapling
Messages
44
Reaction score
0
Location
Vancouver Wa
USDA Zone
6-7
nice!!!

beautiful work. I just clip and grow mehtods for my two elms but they are small tiny shohin and resemble landscaping trees... =( straight trunks and i am so involved in planning others i dont do much but try to keep the form i have established. It is a wonderful tree and very artistic touch. On mine they show mans help on yours i woudl believe nature did this. It is a nice sight and very appealing to my eyes. I think it has potential to be a real show taker. How large is the tree and all that jazz. Nice work!!
 

Kirk

Mame
Messages
181
Reaction score
11
Location
Atlanta
USDA Zone
8a
Brian,

That Hokkaido looks very nice. It's one of the nicer elms of that variety that I have seen. Unlike yours, most look like a candelabra with warts.

Kirk
 

Jason

Shohin
Messages
499
Reaction score
125
Location
Western Oregon
USDA Zone
8
Nice tree. I have one of these in the ground and have been wondering what I'd do when it came time to develop ramification. Clip and grow it is. I think I've snapped a few branches off it just walking by.
 

bretts

Shohin
Messages
273
Reaction score
2
Hokkaido is a miracle tree for bonsai. Those tiny leaves and such. My most local bonsai nursery , Ray Nesci has developed a Hokkaido "strong" variety. This tree is meant to be more flexible and faster growing.
I finally got one last spring fresh from the growing fields so I just gave it a basic wire and trim. Still broke the odd branch but apparently this is much better than beaking just cause you looked at it.
I think I did well for $50 will be an unusual three trunk group but could be great in no time with the right plan.
Maybe you guys should import a cutting or two. Should be easy shipping out of Australia?
I have heard of trouble keeping these guys (+ Sejiu) but I reckon they love my climate of HOT Summers and cool Winters.
Give them LOTS of sun and they seem very happy.
 

Brian Underwood

Chumono
Messages
930
Reaction score
201
Location
Santa Rosa, CA
Thanks for the compliments everyone! Yup, these trees are incredibly brittle, but with the right treatment they can be spectacular. I remember when Walter Pall came to town, he bought a few and shipped them back to Germany. Basically he cut off every single branch, leaving just a trunk, and shipped em' away. He said in ten years they will be spectacular. Maybe he can offer some input on how they are doing.
 

Walter Pall

Masterpiece
Messages
2,560
Reaction score
12,265
Location
south of Munich, Germany
USDA Zone
7b
Here they are as of September 2009. Subsequently I traded them all and don't have a single one. I found that they are NOT good for bonsai. One cannot style them with wire. They are very weak! In winter many branches die. In summer all of a sudden a full subtrunk rots away within a few days because it cought some fungus. There is a reason why we never ever see this variety in big shows in shohin collections. I played with them for a few years and give up. It's a waste of time for me. If they were any good we would be flooded with them from Japan. They don't use them either.
 

Attachments

  • NSC_8019v.jpg
    NSC_8019v.jpg
    52.6 KB · Views: 130
  • NSC_8020v.jpg
    NSC_8020v.jpg
    53.4 KB · Views: 109
  • NSC_8022v.jpg
    NSC_8022v.jpg
    44 KB · Views: 102
Last edited:

Walter Pall

Masterpiece
Messages
2,560
Reaction score
12,265
Location
south of Munich, Germany
USDA Zone
7b
Some will think that this is not so bad. Well, for this species and variety it is not so bad. But it is certainly not good enough for a major show in Europe. And I see no way how I can improve them much further. The thing that really put me off is that every summer a thick trunk dies all of a sudden and ruins the whole design.
 

Attachments

  • NSC_8022v.jpg
    NSC_8022v.jpg
    44 KB · Views: 71
  • NSC_5847ofv.jpg
    NSC_5847ofv.jpg
    53 KB · Views: 77
  • NSC_5848v.jpg
    NSC_5848v.jpg
    51.1 KB · Views: 90

Brian Underwood

Chumono
Messages
930
Reaction score
201
Location
Santa Rosa, CA
I'm sorry to hear they were so much trouble Walter. Thank you for contributing, I always hold your opinions in high regard. I too have experienced such dieback without warning, and sometimes entire trees just drop dead for no reason. This tree will be my last one of the species, so hopefully it make it OK, and if not, I'll stick to the other miniature varieties. What is your preferred elm?
 

Walter Pall

Masterpiece
Messages
2,560
Reaction score
12,265
Location
south of Munich, Germany
USDA Zone
7b
Other varietes of Chines elm with much larger foliage are OK. The European field elm, Ulmus campestre (or minor) is very good.
 

bretts

Shohin
Messages
273
Reaction score
2
I know there has been this said before Walter But I just don't get these problems with them. Can't say I have a show winning tree of one yet but I can say that about all my trees :p

Here is the one I picked up last year. Should be ready for a good work over come Spring.

Also a seiju elm from our Aussie collection.
 

Attachments

  • 001.jpg
    001.jpg
    51.6 KB · Views: 109
  • 002.jpg
    002.jpg
    58.9 KB · Views: 118
  • ss.jpg
    ss.jpg
    54.1 KB · Views: 135

rich415

Mame
Messages
104
Reaction score
0
Location
Oakland, CA
USDA Zone
9b
That sucks. I always think about getting one then I am reminded of others' experiences.


Rich
 

tmmason10

Omono
Messages
1,836
Reaction score
78
Location
North Attleboro, MA
USDA Zone
6b
Sorry to hear that, weird it seemsl like this post was showing that it is possible. Mr. Pall seemed to have the right idea, I wonder how Bretts tree is doing.
 

bretts

Shohin
Messages
273
Reaction score
2
As mine had only just been removed from the field I left it alone last year.

I put it into a bonsai pot and did the first styling on it recently.

Not much to report at the moment but I will update with some pictures soon.

Sorry to hear yours didn't make it :(
 

Brian Underwood

Chumono
Messages
930
Reaction score
201
Location
Santa Rosa, CA
No worries. As Walter said, they are weak. I repotted the tree early this year, and as it was just getting new leaves the snails/slugs ate every single one of them. I put out snail bait, but it was too late and the tree never recovered. It had a few leaves all summer, but eventually gave up. No more hokkaidos for me!
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
NateDavHCBTX Hokkaido Elm Elms 13
C Neglected hokkaido elm Elms 2
Jeremy Hokkaido Elm Summer Clean Up Elms 20
Larz Root bound Hokkaido Elm Elms 7
rrgg126 Found a nice hokkaido elm Elms 11

Similar threads

Top