Japanese White Pine Farm

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
Messages
9,000
Reaction score
16,229
Location
Charlotte area, North Carolina
USDA Zone
7B
3 generations of bonsai farmers that have fields of developed white pines :) Some of these trees have been developed for 80 years. Thought you might enjoy the pics - they are selling for about $5,000 - $10,000.







 

BONSAI_OUTLAW

Banned
Messages
150
Reaction score
1
Location
Woodstown, NJ
I am not able to articulate how much I would like to see stock like this at those prices here in the US. I'd be broke all the time, but I'd be happy.
 

Rick Moquin

Omono
Messages
1,245
Reaction score
8
Location
Dartmouth, NS Canada
USDA Zone
6a
Although impressive, I would be curious to find out how many of these wind up in a bonsai pot vice a manicured Japanese garden. The reason for my observation some need work for bonsai whilst the majority can readily be planted out in a garden. I am talking of branch sizes here.
 

Graydon

Chumono
Messages
717
Reaction score
7
I am not able to articulate how much I would like to see stock like this at those prices here in the US. I'd be broke all the time, but I'd be happy.
I could not put it better than what you said.
 
Messages
1,773
Reaction score
12
Location
Ottawa, KS
USDA Zone
6
Although impressive, I would be curious to find out how many of these wind up in a bonsai pot vice a manicured Japanese garden. The reason for my observation some need work for bonsai whilst the majority can readily be planted out in a garden. I am talking of branch sizes here.
Boy, I'd sure like to try on some of these!
 

Dwight

Chumono
Messages
599
Reaction score
7
Location
El Paso , TX
Damn !!!!! I can't afford any of those but they are stunners. Wish I could gropw them here but I think the heat would do them in.
 

Rick Moquin

Omono
Messages
1,245
Reaction score
8
Location
Dartmouth, NS Canada
USDA Zone
6a
Boy, I'd sure like to try on some of these!
When we talk about talent, technical or inhereted, neither you, myself, nor anyone else that frequently frequents this forum has what it takes to turn these into a bonsai. Hence the question what were they destined for, which is quite a ligitimate question when we have a look at BF and see what needs to transpire during restyling of trees without this girth.

Yes as others I am drooling, but I am a realist.
 

rlist

Shohin
Messages
294
Reaction score
4
Location
Portland, OR
USDA Zone
8a
When we talk about talent, technical or inhereted, neither you, myself, nor anyone else that frequently frequents this forum has what it takes to turn these into a bonsai. Hence the question what were they destined for, which is quite a ligitimate question when we have a look at BF and see what needs to transpire during restyling of trees without this girth.

Yes as others I am drooling, but I am a realist.
IF Chris completes all the intensives;
AND said person pays attention;
AND more importantly is able to grasp the conscepts and translate them to working on the trees...
He will be a frequently frequenter that is able to turn these into a bonsai. Albeit a large one...
 

rlist

Shohin
Messages
294
Reaction score
4
Location
Portland, OR
USDA Zone
8a
Rlist was spending a little too much time smelling the rooting hormone :)
No, and if you keep this up you and I will have to meet in the cafeteria... :eek:

I believe Rick was implying that there is nobody of the caliber of talent and has the knowledge of the techniques to turn these pre-bonsai into finished bonsai. What I was saying is that I somewhat agree, but we do have one frequent frequenter in Chris Johnston who has/is positioning himself to acquire the skillset required by completing the Boon intensives. Upon completion, and assuming he paid attention and retained the information taught by Boon, he would be more than capable of refining this raw stock... Clear enough for you now?? :cool:
 
Last edited:

Attila Soos

Omono
Messages
1,804
Reaction score
33
Location
Los Angeles (Altadena), CA
USDA Zone
9
I agree that acquiring one of thise huge pines is equivalent to receiving the proverbial White Elephant as present.

It would take so much to style and maintain it, that one would have nothing left for any other tree. This would be the only bonsai one would have.

The only way that one could handle this and also have fun with it, would be to go through a specific training of how to routinely maintain this specific category of trees. It would be a step-by-step thing, and marked on the calendar.
 
Last edited:

Rick Moquin

Omono
Messages
1,245
Reaction score
8
Location
Dartmouth, NS Canada
USDA Zone
6a
Yes an No Rich. If we look closely at these trees they are 6 man/forklift bonsai, when we categorize them in that fashion. Hence my question were they grown for "gardens"?

It is not the concept of turning them into bonsai that is amiss here, but the shear size of these trees makes it extremely difficult to transform. You cut a branch off on one of these puppies and it is not so easy to bend another into the large gap left behind, although I doubt much intervention would be needed from what is observed here. They just seem rathe rlarge for the average individual, hence "garden" trees.
 

rlist

Shohin
Messages
294
Reaction score
4
Location
Portland, OR
USDA Zone
8a
Yes an No Rich. If we look closely at these trees they are 6 man/forklift bonsai, when we categorize them in that fashion. Hence my question were they grown for "gardens"?

It is not the concept of turning them into bonsai that is amiss here, but the shear size of these trees makes it extremely difficult to transform. You cut a branch off on one of these puppies and it is not so easy to bend another into the large gap left behind, although I doubt much intervention would be needed from what is observed here. They just seem rathe rlarge for the average individual, hence "garden" trees.
I agree these are large trees, and my first comment said something like "albeit a large one". So, we are in agreement there. However, I think we have different concepts of "large bonsai"...

Note: Photos owned by Walter Pall. The dude in blue (Randy Knight) is 6'1" for a size comparison.
 

Attachments

Tachigi

Omono
Messages
1,201
Reaction score
32
Location
PA.
USDA Zone
6b
Rich, I think that Oregon bonsai material even though quite large would be dwarfed next to these Sumos. I think the reality is that these were grown for gardens and not bonsai. This a kin to seeing a spectacular tree in the wild that you have no chance in hell to collect because of its size. I would have people gauge the size of these trees by the steps in the background. Imperial bonsai maybe if you don't want to show it, move it, or do much of anything else.
 

Rick Moquin

Omono
Messages
1,245
Reaction score
8
Location
Dartmouth, NS Canada
USDA Zone
6a
Rich, I think that Oregon bonsai material even though quite large would be dwarfed next to these Sumos. I think the reality is that these were grown for gardens and not bonsai. This a kin to seeing a spectacular tree in the wild that you have no chance in hell to collect because of its size. I would have people gauge the size of these trees by the steps in the background. Imperial bonsai maybe if you don't want to show it, move it, or do much of anything else.
That was my point Tom, thanks for sharing. I was beginning to think I was thj only one. Mind you I wouldn't mind having one for a landscape tree.
 
Messages
2,776
Reaction score
15
Location
Michigan, USA
USDA Zone
5
Although impressive, I would be curious to find out how many of these wind up in a bonsai pot vice a manicured Japanese garden. The reason for my observation some need work for bonsai whilst the majority can readily be planted out in a garden. I am talking of branch sizes here.
Given the fact that Japanese growers have been known to burn trees that don't measure up as opposed to releasing them on the market and drive the prices down, I wonder how many of these we are drooling over will simply be burnt?



Will
 
Top Bottom