Moving Trident Maple

digger714

Shohin
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Hello all. I hope everyone is doing good. I had to move a couple of trident maples off the neighbors lot, which used to be vacant. I thought it would be ok to do it this time of year, but the leaves are drooping, and a couple are getting crispy. Should i go ahead and chop them back so the growing power will be directed to the roots, or just let it go, and see if it makes it? Any help on this would be great. Thanks again.
 

donkey

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The only thing i can think of is to mist the foliage 3 - 4 times a day and foliage feed every 10 day's. This has worked for me when i've had to dig trees too late in the season.
 

jk_lewis

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How big are they? How many roots did you get? Did you put them in the ground or a pot? What aftercare have you given them? I'll probably have more questions when you answer.

I will say, however, that digging a maple after the leafes are out is gonna be tough sledding.
 

digger714

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The trunks are about 2", the trees are about 6' tall , maybe a little larger. The roots were about 20"-24" wide, and i put into a
30" round training pot. Im keeping it in the shade, and misting the leaves 2-3 times a day, or more if i can. It had a good amount of fiborous roots, and have moved many like this when dormant, even just a few weeks ago, but i know this is a tough time. Im just not sure if it would be better to go ahead and trunk chop it down to 12" or so to direct the flow of nutrients to the roots? should i root feed it? Thanks for the feedback.
 

rockm

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If if were me, I'd chop the trunks now --eliminating all foliage--you're probably going to lose the foliage anyway. I'd then move them into the shade and keep them moist--not soggy--until new growth pops on the trunks. This shouldn't be a problem with tridents, especially tridents that have been growing in the ground.

I would also stop misting. Misting trees in soil that has organics in it (and that aren't using any water because of root work) leads to soggy soil. Soggy soil inhibits new roots and rots old ones.

For what it's worth, maples (tridents and Japanese --acer palmatum) can be pretty safely root pruned in early summer/late spring once their leaves have "hardened off" --turned leathery in texture. Leaves are particularly vulnerable when they've just emerged and still soft.
 

digger714

Shohin
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Thanks alot Rockm. I just got through chopping it. Most of the leaves that were close to the top were already dead, so i think this will be the best bet. Ill let you know how it does. Thanks again for your suggestion.
 
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discusmike

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I'd take rock'ms advice,ive dug in early spring when leaves had hardended and have not had any trouble,sometimes ive had the tips of leaves on tridents get crispy,but this lasted only for a week or two,if you saved most of the root system,your probalbly okay.Good luck.
 

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