My third bonsai pot creation

Bonsai4life

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I made this pot on Friday. It is the third pot I made since I decided to get into the bonsai and pottery hobby. It is made from terra-cotta clay I bought from a craft store. I used the slab technique shown by some videos on YouTube. Any ideas on what colors I should use as glaze? I’m planning on using it for a ficus. Thank you
 

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penumbra

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Color is such a personal thing. The most popular glaze color for bonsai pots is blue, but I really like greens quite a bit especially since you have leaves on this pot. I would use a subtle green that breaks for contrast on texture. Amaco's PC Vert Lustre comes to mind but it is just one of many choices. This is a cone 6 glaze.
Of greater concern to me is you clay body. What exactly is terra-cotta craftstore clay? Who is the manufacturer? Is it low fire craft clay? Is it mid or high fire? I hate to see anybody take the time to make a nice pot only to ignore the clay itself. I would never consider making or buying a clay pot that was not fired to at least cone 6 and was vitrified with a low absorption rate at cone 6 or above. I am concerned for you because terra-cotta to me means a low fire red clay. This might be suitable for a tropical plant that doesn't experience a freeze thaw cycle. A lower fire clay also demands a low fire glaze.
Tell us more about the clay and where and how it is to be fired and you will get a lot more response.
 

Juanmi

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I agree with @penumbra , color is a very personal thing, and there are so many choices... In my opinion it would look killer in a really dark red, but you're the one to make the final decision.

Oh man, seeing all this posts about pots makes me want to give it a try, but I really don't know where to start. Is there any info aviable about materials, clays, glazes, ... etc. (Also, I don't know where I could fire it, but that is a problem for another day)
 

Bonsai4life

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Color is such a personal thing. The most popular glaze color for bonsai pots is blue, but I really like greens quite a bit especially since you have leaves on this pot. I would use a subtle green that breaks for contrast on texture. Amaco's PC Vert Lustre comes to mind but it is just one of many choices. This is a cone 6 glaze.
Of greater concern to me is you clay body. What exactly is terra-cotta craftstore clay? Who is the manufacturer? Is it low fire craft clay? Is it mid or high fire? I hate to see anybody take the time to make a nice pot only to ignore the clay itself. I would never consider making or buying a clay pot that was not fired to at least cone 6 and was vitrified with a low absorption rate at cone 6 or above. I am concerned for you because terra-cotta to me means a low fire red clay. This might be suitable for a tropical plant that doesn't experience a freeze thaw cycle. A lower fire clay also demands a low fire glaze.
Tell us more about the clay and where and how it is to be fired and you will get a lot more response.
Thank you for the information! The brand for the clay is Craft Smart. The only information I found on the internet is that it can be fired once it is completely dry. They previous pots I made from the same clay were fired and glazed and they are still holding up. I live in Arizona so I’m not concerned about cold temperatures. Not sure if the are low or high fire or anything. I’m completely new to this. Eventually I would love to take some pottery courses.
 

Bonsai4life

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I agree with @penumbra , color is a very personal thing, and there are so many choices... In my opinion it would look killer in a really dark red, but you're the one to make the final decision.

Oh man, seeing all this posts about pots makes me want to give it a try, but I really don't know where to start. Is there any info aviable about materials, clays, glazes, ... etc. (Also, I don't know where I could fire it, but that is a problem for another day)
I’m not sure what the best clay is to make a bonsai pot but I tried with what I found on a craft store. I rented a kiln a few miles away from home to fire and glaze my previous two pots.
 

Pitoon

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I’m not sure what the best clay is to make a bonsai pot but I tried with what I found on a craft store. I rented a kiln a few miles away from home to fire and glaze my previous two pots.
Any clay that is formulated to become stoneware after it's been fired would be ideal. Some clays become fully vitrified at Cone 6 others at Cone 10.....absorption rate is also something to consider.
 

Juanmi

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Any clay that is formulated to become stoneware after it's been fired would be ideal. Some clays become fully vitrified at Cone 6 others at Cone 10.....absorption rate is also something to consider.
Thank you @Pitoon , with just one word ("stoneware") you helped me to find the information I was seeking.
 

penumbra

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In my opinion it would look killer in a really dark red, but you're the one to make the final decision.
I love dark red glazes but they do not sell all that well.
I really don't know where to start.
There are a lot of places including community colleges that have pottery classes here but I don't know how it is in France. IMO, hands on instruction will significantly shorten the learning curve. Classes are great because there is open communication not only between instructor and student, but between students as well.
The brand for the clay is Craft Smart.
What I can find about Craft Smart is that it is an air dry clay ( that can be baked in an oven) that is nontoxic for children and dabblers. If this is the case, and I believe it is, don't waste your time and talent with this stuff. Get into a class or work with another potter who has real stoneware clay and real kilns.
Nice work, but I think the feet are too tall.
I like some of my pots to be high footed. I think it works well with many plants, particularly those with a light airy texture .
 
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