My Tiniest tree, What are you trying that's new??

RickMartin

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Just saw this post and sharing this little guy, a mame quercus serrata. It is my very first true mame sized tree in my collection and the only oak I own. A charming tree specially in leaf which is similar to beech but with serrated edges. I have become enamored in the last couple of years with deciduous oaks. At the moment I am looking for some large collected ones. Got this one as part of a trade last year.

Thats a very nice little oak you have there..i have one im working on and its alot of fun..question for you..do you defoilate the tree during the growing season

Rick
 

RickMartin

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20160430_092508.jpg
This is my little oak..working on a pot for it now..but it will stay in this one for a couple of years..i would put it in the ground but where i live i dont have any ground
 

MACH5

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Thats a very nice little oak you have there..i have one im working on and its alot of fun..question for you..do you defoilate the tree during the growing season

Rick

Rick I have not had this tree for very long and in the process of becoming more familiar with Quercus species. So at the moment just enjoying it for its beauty. I will post an update once the leaves are out.

Perhaps you may want to start putting some wire on your tree to give it some movement?
 

RickMartin

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Yeah thought about that..the branches im going to..im not sure they are going to be keepers yet..if i can get some budding a little lower the top one will go..that trunk as small as it is..im not bending that..i will have to get movement in that be getting a new leader..i didnt realize i could enjoy these trees like i do..they are pretty dang cool.

Rick
 

RickMartin

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If i prune back the top two branches will it promote back budding along the trunk.. I know i can do this with elms but havent worked with oaks before.

Rick
 

coppice

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I forget the last time I tried really tiny trees about every ten years. I set some up, and about July it returns that I need to water them about eight times a day...

Every day.
 

RickMartin

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I forget the last time I tried really tiny trees about every ten years. I set some up, and about July it returns that I need to water them about eight times a day...

Every day.
Yeah they need watered alot..im fortunate enough to have a woman that loves bonsai as much as i do, so she does the watering if any is needed during the day while im at work..

Rick
 

JoeR

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0soyoung

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Is the laceleaf from a cutting? How did you get it to root?
I have 4 of these in my landscape and found this as a volunteer seedling under one of them. Surprisingly, the leaves are smaller than the apparent parent's (still kinda big for this scale , though).

Rooting cuttings or making air layers is a good way to come up with thicker stems, but all 5 of these are volunteers that either grew where the seed fell or were stashed/planted by my neighborhood squirrels. The nuts were dug spring/summer of 2015 - this past spring I removed the nut, shortened the tap root, and put them in the mini pots. The laceleaf and fothergilla were also dug last year, but this will be their first winter in the mini pots.
 

JoeR

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I have 4 of these in my landscape and found this as a volunteer seedling under one of them. Surprisingly, the leaves are smaller than the apparent parent's (still kinda big for this scale , though).

Rooting cuttings or making air layers is a good way to come up with thicker stems, but all 5 of these are volunteers that either grew where the seed fell or were stashed/planted by my neighborhood squirrels. The nuts were dug spring/summer of 2015 - this past spring I removed the nut, shortened the tap root, and put them in the mini pots. The laceleaf and fothergilla were also dug last year, but this will be their first winter in the mini pots.
Interesting that the leaves are still 'lacey' even from seed. I thought they reverted back to standard JM. Have you tried cuttings/AL from your laceleafs?
 

0soyoung

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Interesting that the leaves are still 'lacey' even from seed. I thought they reverted back to standard JM. Have you tried cuttings/AL from your laceleafs?
No, I haven't because I've got lots of other acer palmatums in the yard that seem more interesting than these laceleafs, but maybe I should lose that prejudice, given the results with this seedling.
 

Eric Group

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Interesting that the leaves are still 'lacey' even from seed. I thought they reverted back to standard JM. Have you tried cuttings/AL from your laceleafs?
Seedlings don't "revert" back to standard JM, they are a mix of the two (more? Those freaky trees!) parents and generally will have traits of both. Commonly a laceleaf seedling will not have the same leaves as the parent. It is not RELIABLE that they will be identical to parents from seed, but not a guarantee they show only the traits of "standard" Acer Palmatum either. That is why, if you have a specific trait you are looking for in a tree layers, cuttings and grafts are the only reliable ways to reproduce those specific traits. Sure, Sometimes a seedling may have very similar traits to the parent reees, but the diversity is huge and quite random.
 

coachspinks

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I have no idea why those pictures showed up the way they did. Blame it on a techno challenged old guy. However, some kingsville cuttings that rooted and are now potted
 

Danielm

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At this point they are all inside. Not sure if they want full sun! Does anyone know if erodium does well in full sun? The pots being so small my first choice will be to find a place with morning sun and afternoon shade.

As indoor plants I water them every other day. The tiniest tree I planted in straight sand. If I put it outside it will be planted it in a larger pot of haydite and let the roots grow into the larger pot.

For people wanting to mess around with something indoors, it is a great plant.
I’d love to try this .... what about feeding ?
 

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