opinion of my pinion

Messages
1,489
Likes
630
Location
Wyoming
USDA Zone
4
#81
Hi Woodland Spirit, and welcome to the forum!

I haven't been on B-nut as much lately, but I used to spend WAY too much time here... lol. If that's possible. I hope to be on here more again soon. - For some background, I collect trees (some very old) from the Rocky Mountains here in Wyoming.

My opinion of you pinion: I like it. Have fun with it! You only "need" to put it in the ground if you're after a larger, fatter tree. There is honestly no reason you can't create an elegant bonsai out of this tree as soon as it's ready to be worked on. I think many people get confused by looking only at the big shows for their inspiration. All you need is the horticulture (which it sounds like you have a good grasp on) and a bit of artistic vision for what you'd like to see the tree become, along with time and technique. It will grow bark over the years.

Don't loose the ability to see beauty in the small simple trees. If a person is "doing it right" you can find just as much joy working on a small tree like this as you can working on a 300 year old collected pine or a masterpiece bonsai worth thousands. Sure the older, expensive trees are far more likely to win a big show, but if winning shows is the only reason people do bonsai then they are missing the most meaningful parts of bonsai.

I hardly ever read the beginner threads any more, because I'm incredibly sick of how often people are told their tree is worthless and to stick it in the ground for 10 years. Bonsai is about growing and enjoying trees in pots. Start with what you have, and if you decide you want bigger older trees.. then follow the techniques to get there or buy/collect them.

You've already gotten some great advice! I really liked what Leo had to say, and I don't necessarily disagree with others ideas to help you along with older trees, it's just not necessarily necessary, unless that's what you want.

Dan
 
Messages
631
Likes
366
Location
Near Utah/Arizona border.
#82
Hi Woodland Spirit, and welcome to the forum!

I haven't been on B-nut as much lately, but I used to spend WAY too much time here... lol. If that's possible. I hope to be on here more again soon. - For some background, I collect trees (some very old) from the Rocky Mountains here in Wyoming.

My opinion of you pinion: I like it. Have fun with it! You only "need" to put it in the ground if you're after a larger, fatter tree. There is honestly no reason you can't create an elegant bonsai out of this tree as soon as it's ready to be worked on. I think many people get confused by looking only at the big shows for their inspiration. All you need is the horticulture (which it sounds like you have a good grasp on) and a bit of artistic vision for what you'd like to see the tree become, along with time and technique. It will grow bark over the years.

Don't loose the ability to see beauty in the small simple trees. If a person is "doing it right" you can find just as much joy working on a small tree like this as you can working on a 300 year old collected pine or a masterpiece bonsai worth thousands. Sure the older, expensive trees are far more likely to win a big show, but if winning shows is the only reason people do bonsai then they are missing the most meaningful parts of bonsai.

I hardly ever read the beginner threads any more, because I'm incredibly sick of how often people are told their tree is worthless and to stick it in the ground for 10 years. Bonsai is about growing and enjoying trees in pots. Start with what you have, and if you decide you want bigger older trees.. then follow the techniques to get there or buy/collect them.

You've already gotten some great advice! I really liked what Leo had to say, and I don't necessarily disagree with others ideas to help you along with older trees, it's just not necessarily necessary, unless that's what you want.

Dan
You have summed up the school of thought I have chosen to follow quite well.
Also, I enjoy growing anything I can.
One thing either I, and a few others don't understand, or the bulk of people don't seem to understand is seeing future potential. I look at many of the trees people say are no good for bonsai and I think it only takes time, work and artistic creativity. There are some who buy a potted juniper cut it up and pot it. Fine if it's ready. But if it's not ready that doesn't mean it can't become ready.
Poor nebri? Good! Let's make some good nebri. Reverse taper? Great! I love a fixeruper.
This does not mean I am not looking for excellent material.
I'm not afraid to have hundreds of trees, all being done a little differently.
One day I will have my own techniques figured out. But right now I want to try everything.
Not every sorta treeish greenery I find will work out.
Ok.
If they don't die they can go to my wild woods or become a hedge.
Now I've got going on a tangent but I'm really trying to say that I listen to people like you who give positive advice and tell me how to do things far above the people who tell me not to do things. Negative statements just don't impress me.

I've rambled on a bit so I'll cut it short.
Thank you. I hope to hear (read) more from you.

PS the survival of this tree is still questionable, due to my coming to this forum to late.
 
Messages
1,489
Likes
630
Location
Wyoming
USDA Zone
4
#84
You will learn to evaluate trees as you go. Some trees have so many issues that would take so much time and effort to fix that you would be far ahead sticking it in your hedge right away and working on other trees.. lol. However, if it survives, I don't personally consider this pinion to be one of those trees.

I think pinion pines have great potential as bonsai, just remember when you do go to style them, that you will need to leave the wire on for a very long time.. Years actually. Even let the wire begin biting into the branches a bit, or they will never set (hold position after wire is removed).

Eric Schrader, who was one of the first responders to this thread runs one of the best bonsai blogs out there. Certainly don't throw out his advice. He knows what he's talking about. He's got a great bristlecone pine that I think would be good inspiration for what you can do with a little pine like this, but I'm having trouble finding a picture. I'll post a link when I find it.
And here's his blog: http://www.phutu.com/
 
Messages
193
Likes
26
Location
Washougal, WA
USDA Zone
7
#87
Pinions are beautiful trees. I've not seen that many in bonsai, but have seen some really nice ones in the wild in New Mexico.

Glad to hear you got it outside. Hope it survives. Will have a better chance now.

I've got one little pinion that was about the size of yours 4 or 5 years ago. Have had it in the ground (under an overhang so it won't get the PNW saturation) for the last 3 years and its not much thicker than then. These are slow growing pines for sure. I've never seen a really nice pinion bonsai, but I think the species has really good potential and some really great yamadori no doubt exist. I've found it hard to dig these though because in their native dry climate the roots have to go deep to find water. Good luck in your search.
 
Messages
12,411
Likes
12,922
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
5-6
#89
DSC_2268.JPG DSC_2274.JPG


Do you have access to a current photo of this tree. Pinions have the most beautiful foliage.

Above are photos of the tree from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.
 

aml1014

Masterpiece
Messages
3,651
Likes
5,643
Location
Albuquerque new mexico
USDA Zone
7b
#91

Attachments

aml1014

Masterpiece
Messages
3,651
Likes
5,643
Location
Albuquerque new mexico
USDA Zone
7b
#92
Pinions are beautiful trees. I've not seen that many in bonsai, but have seen some really nice ones in the wild in New Mexico.

Glad to hear you got it outside. Hope it survives. Will have a better chance now.

I've got one little pinion that was about the size of yours 4 or 5 years ago. Have had it in the ground (under an overhang so it won't get the PNW saturation) for the last 3 years and its not much thicker than then. These are slow growing pines for sure. I've never seen a really nice pinion bonsai, but I think the species has really good potential and some really great yamadori no doubt exist. I've found it hard to dig these though because in their native dry climate the roots have to go deep to find water. Good luck in your search.
New Mexico is an untapped source for yamodori but unfortunately there's very few places you can get a permit. Two wonderful trees down here for Bonsai but are difficult to collect is the pinion and one seed juniper. Gorgeous desert we have down here.

Aaron
 
Top Bottom