Request tree identification

Messages
1,458
Reaction score
2,752
Location
Bothell, WA
USDA Zone
8b
Hello One and All!
This I my first special request for an identification. Please help if you can.

Situation: Small cluster dug up on friends ye olde farmstead.

Tree was positioned between a big flowering quince and a flowering plum tree with bronze leaves. Apple orchard and a Pear tree within stones throw. Also assorted rhodies, hazelnut, azalea, chokecherry and red flowering current near by.
1FE5098A-7D6A-4D31-B389-3216032206F3.jpeg 7E4D9D6F-6FD1-47CB-A622-47AFC48DE34C.jpeg 26A6758F-D521-4BCB-92B3-3055F93D8990.jpeg

Quick bend event with a piece of discarded wire revels it’s stiff, yet doable on multi year wood. Looks like maybe Roseaceae like ‘scars‘ low on trunk.

58502D13-7F61-4027-ABB1-AD6D1CF44224.jpeg 2B14BDCA-0B4A-40C3-841A-0AB930995007.jpeg

Mystery tree...! Wait until flower?

Anyways thanks for any ideas. Hate to ask, yet I know there are some ID Jedi’s out there!
Cheers
DSD sends
 

Japonicus

Masterpiece
Messages
3,102
Reaction score
3,891
Location
Western West Virginia AHS heat zone 6
USDA Zone
6ab
could it be a forsythia? I know their stem is pithy on the inside.
The trunk just has that forsythia look to it. Flower next year, if so, has already past.
 

misfit11

Omono
Messages
1,008
Reaction score
1,431
Location
Petaluma CA
USDA Zone
9b
I agree with Rosaceae Family. Could be a plum. If you could post a clear picture of one of the leaves it might help. The veination might add a clue.
 
Last edited:

penumbra

Masterpiece
Messages
4,778
Reaction score
7,177
Location
Front Royal, VA
USDA Zone
6
could it be a forsythia? I know their stem is pithy on the inside.
The trunk just has that forsythia look to it. Flower next year, if so, has already past.
Looking at the leaves my first thought was also forsythia.
 
Messages
1,458
Reaction score
2,752
Location
Bothell, WA
USDA Zone
8b
364C161D-53E5-497F-81FB-425D14705254.jpeg

So far the leaves are very small, perhaps 1/2, slight serrations on the margins
 
Messages
1,458
Reaction score
2,752
Location
Bothell, WA
USDA Zone
8b
Not so you’d notice.
Here’s a photo of both the branch cross section as well as one of a root.

C3F20583-FEAD-4391-B99F-05A3BF1E3265.jpeg
4183FAD2-FA59-418B-B491-EEA75BFBF9A3.jpeg

btw I neglected to mention that there was a traveling horizontal root connecting this clump to another nearby.
 

penumbra

Masterpiece
Messages
4,778
Reaction score
7,177
Location
Front Royal, VA
USDA Zone
6
Forsythia leaves. I forgot the variety as it was planted many years ago but it has very pronounced lighter veins in sun. Not so much on this one in the shade. It is in the Olive family.
IMG_4700.JPGIMG_4699.JPG
 

Japonicus

Masterpiece
Messages
3,102
Reaction score
3,891
Location
Western West Virginia AHS heat zone 6
USDA Zone
6ab
Leaves not pointy enough for Forsythia, but if stems are hollow...
I thought same but unaware of different varieties habits so I went for the trunk.
I snagged this sprig of forsythia on our evening walk.
DSC_6279.JPGDSC_6277.JPG
hollow, and some leaves more rounded than others, mostly sharp though, mostly serrated.
I agree
Not so you’d notice.
Here’s a photo of both the branch cross section as well as one of a root.

View attachment 370651
View attachment 370652

btw I neglected to mention that there was a traveling horizontal root connecting this clump to another nearby.
yeh other than that surface root the characteristics for forsythia not there. Sorry can't help.
 

penumbra

Masterpiece
Messages
4,778
Reaction score
7,177
Location
Front Royal, VA
USDA Zone
6
Forsythia leaves. I forgot the variety as it was planted many years ago but it has very pronounced lighter veins in sun. Not so much on this one in the shade. It is in the Olive family.
View attachment 370653View attachment 370654
Put a branch in a glass of water. It is forsythia and will start rooting in a week. Leaves I pictured are nearly identical in size and shape.
 
Last edited:

rodeolthr

Mame
Messages
217
Reaction score
178
Location
Seattle, WA
USDA Zone
8a
It certainly could be flowering quince. I have them popping up on an undeveloped lot, that the birds must have planted. I'm sure that you've seen the cotton candy pink ones that are currently in bloom. I "believe" that it's the species? Uncertain though
 
Messages
1,458
Reaction score
2,752
Location
Bothell, WA
USDA Zone
8b
Here’s a photo of the big Quince nearest. Beautiful, yet huge flowers. Sadly the leaves seem much different then the clump....64EB3F5B-E83D-4412-A865-9B65B127C019.jpeg
...yet the flowers were huge 1.5” across.
 

Forsoothe!

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,503
Reaction score
8,345
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
6b
Not like Chinese or American Quince. Everyone can use the VTD database to search for suspects. Most likely to be a native to western Washington, about which us Easterners know nothing.
 

Shibui

Masterpiece
Messages
3,905
Reaction score
7,362
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
My first reaction was also Japanese flowering quince but close up of leaves does not look quite right.
There is some resemblance to pussy willow which comes up here as weeds but I'm not confident of that either.
 

Potawatomi13

Masterpiece
Messages
4,286
Reaction score
2,916
Location
Eugene, OR
USDA Zone
8
I thought same but unaware of different varieties habits so I went for the trunk.
I snagged this sprig of forsythia on our evening walk.
View attachment 370655View attachment 370656
hollow, and some leaves more rounded than others, mostly sharp though, mostly serrated.
I agree

yeh other than that surface root the characteristics for forsythia not there. Sorry can't help.

Plant in question has non opposing leaves. Forsythia does. Leaves not so round on end like Quince either;). Maybe no help, just points.
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom