Teach me about pots

Carol 83

Masterpiece
Messages
4,451
Reaction score
10,274
Location
Alhambra,IL
@GailC sorry your thread got derailed. In the end, get pots that appeal to you, whatever style, color, size. They're your trees and you can put them in whatever pleases you. My favorite pot is purple, which is not exactly everyone's cup of tea, but I love it.
 

GailC

Chumono
Messages
989
Reaction score
956
Location
North ID
USDA Zone
4-5
@GailC sorry your thread got derailed. In the end, get pots that appeal to you, whatever style, color, size. They're your trees and you can put them in whatever pleases you. My favorite pot is purple, which is not exactly everyone's cup of tea, but I love it.
Oh, I plan on it. I still want a nice bright pink pot, some day maybe I'll have one custom made.

I still need to learn though. I under stand colors better now, shape and size is next.
 

Schmikah

Mame
Messages
195
Reaction score
219
Location
Knoxville TN
USDA Zone
7a
Just to address the original question.

From a design perspective (forget the trees for a second), proportion, line (or absence there of), color, composition, context, placement (which is, in and of itself, an entire discussion), and lighting are all considerations when it comes to "what should I do" decisions.

Coming from a design background, it is really difficult for me to look at any tree outside of those points. That being said, I have come to two different, personal opinions.

1. I have never seen a composition with an unglazed pot that I hate. It may or may not have been better with glaze, but the pot did not detract from the tree due to neutrality. Obviously I have my own opinions on what colors might have been better but it never soured me on the tree.

2. Bonsai means, more or less "tree in a pot". For bonsai to be what I think "we" want it to be, we have to really think about what we display our trees in. **See p.s. below**. Some of is cannot afford expensive pots and for some of us (like myself), our definition of what is a good design leans away from traditional bonsai. I submit Nick Lenz.

My advice would be to get a wider breadth of design and art experience. I'm a novice at the craft, but I have a passable knowledge of design. It never hurt to see what other artists are doing with other mediums.

P.S. part : don't let a lack of ceramics stop you. Either find the tree you want to put in a pot, or find the pot you need to find a tree for. Both are exciting
 

Adair M

Pinus Envy
Messages
13,084
Reaction score
29,504
Location
NEGeorgia
USDA Zone
7a
A pot doesn’t have to be expensive to be a good match for a tree. Old pots with patina, however, help reinforce the image that the tree is “old”. An old tree (or a tree that just looks old) when stuck in a brand new pot can look awkward. It’s not a bad idea to store your unused pots outside where they are exposed to the elements and start the patina building. I know of several people who store their pots under the benches.
 

RKatzin

Chumono
Messages
961
Reaction score
1,125
Location
Grants Pass, Oregon, USA
USDA Zone
7
Lololol, oh I'm cracking up, you're gonna love this. I started buying pots just last August and I'm getting a nice collection so far. I went out to have a look see after reading this thread. Now granted that blue is my color and green at close second, and I'm just browsing and picking up things I like, I realize almost every glazed pot I've bought is blue. From deep dark colbolt to soft baby blue and turquoise. One bright red Sorce pot sticking out like neon.
 

Carol 83

Masterpiece
Messages
4,451
Reaction score
10,274
Location
Alhambra,IL
Lololol, oh I'm cracking up, you're gonna love this. I started buying pots just last August and I'm getting a nice collection so far. I went out to have a look see after reading this thread. Now granted that blue is my color and green at close second, and I'm just browsing and picking up things I like, I realize almost every glazed pot I've bought is blue. From deep dark colbolt to soft baby blue and turquoise. One bright red Sorce pot sticking out like neon.
Join the club. I have an affinity for blue pots, most with a drippy glaze, so what, I like them. My favorites are from @Soldano666 and Chuck Iker. I also have an awesome red @sorce pot that is going to be a great match for a crape myrtle sometime soon. My purple sorce pot is my all time favorite. You like what you like.
 

Forsoothe!

Masterpiece
Messages
3,652
Reaction score
4,182
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
6b
Remember, taste is in the mouth of the beholder. I buy my pots for me and my enjoyment, and I enjoy my pots, even if others don't. I make no apologies for my taste in pots any more than I would apologize for the kinds of trees I like. This is my hobby, I'm not Japanese, and I think they might be amused at us, anyway.
 

RKatzin

Chumono
Messages
961
Reaction score
1,125
Location
Grants Pass, Oregon, USA
USDA Zone
7
I did buy some pots for specific trees. I have a couple of cascades and a few forests that present certain requirements. But I have so many (rapidly developing the opinion of too many) trees I'm just gobbling up pots as fast as monies allow. I ain't put a dent in it! It's almost as addictive as bonsai itself. There's definitely a feeling to a finely crafted piece of pottery. Oolala!
 

RKatzin

Chumono
Messages
961
Reaction score
1,125
Location
Grants Pass, Oregon, USA
USDA Zone
7
I have a question for you crafters concerning unglazed pottery. Once a piece is fired, is there anything that can be done to finesse, tidy up any blemishes? If the pots a bit coarse is it considered artistic flare or wabi sabi, or can it be cleaned up?
I got one Yixing pot that was what I would call cobby. Lots of burrs and clinging bits. I ran water over it and scrubbed it down good with coarse steel wool. It cleaned up real nice, there's some what look like tool or wipe marks that would need some fill or something. It's good solid hardware, but irksome aestheticly. How do you deal with these little imperfections? Or is this what separates the good from the bad and the ugly?
 

RKatzin

Chumono
Messages
961
Reaction score
1,125
Location
Grants Pass, Oregon, USA
USDA Zone
7
Begging your pardon Gail, I know this is your thread, but I'm hoping you can benefit as well.
I have another ignorant novice question.
Can anything be done with broken pots? Besides paving the driveway.
 

TomB

Chumono
Messages
788
Reaction score
3,900
Location
S.E. UK
Do a search for ‘kintsugi’
 

penumbra

Masterpiece
Messages
2,428
Reaction score
2,612
Location
Front Royal, VA
USDA Zone
6
I have a question for you crafters concerning unglazed pottery. Once a piece is fired, is there anything that can be done to finesse, tidy up any blemishes? If the pots a bit coarse is it considered artistic flare or wabi sabi, or can it be cleaned up?
I got one Yixing pot that was what I would call cobby. Lots of burrs and clinging bits. I ran water over it and scrubbed it down good with coarse steel wool. It cleaned up real nice, there's some what look like tool or wipe marks that would need some fill or something. It's good solid hardware, but irksome aestheticly. How do you deal with these little imperfections? Or is this what separates the good from the bad and the ugly?
Good pots are art. Art is subjective. Don't buy what is not right for you. What you consider irksome aesthetics may be exactly what was intended and maybe not, but changing the pot from what it was is a challenge and maybe not the best choice in every instance. There are tons of very expensive pots out there that I consider irksome aesthetically. There are tons of less expensive pots that I find divine.
 

penumbra

Masterpiece
Messages
2,428
Reaction score
2,612
Location
Front Royal, VA
USDA Zone
6
Can anything be done with broken pots? Besides paving the driveway.
I have a number of pots that were epoxied back together and I simply put their best face forward and use them. One of my epoxied pots I repaired over 20 years ago and it has held up very well despite never having been out of the weather.
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
26,767
Reaction score
35,676
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
. How do you deal with these little imperfections? Or is this what separates the good from the bad and the ugly?
I had a problem with "post firing tidying" as far as using a grinder to "clean up" glaze drips in the electric kiln, mostly because the actual clay pot itself was usually compromised. So no amount of grinding was going to put chunks back.

After wood firing, specifically 36 hours or more, when it becomes commonplace, and necessary to smooth wadding bits from feet and such, I went back and tidied some old seconds from the electric.

It IS art after all, I find it real hard to throw something out that may make someone's display perfect. No one will ever see a piece of the back of a foot missing.

But then folks may wonder, why did this ceramicist out this shit pot out, as I have about others.

In the end, I think it's important to hold a pot before you buy it. Don't buy pots without seeing pictures of every angle.

In this case, same as Mirai's reputation, you can't just buy a pot because the artist has a good reputation, unless you want the chance of buying a pot someone else may have broke. Or even a pot with an unidentified flaw.

It is well known that pots can break years later for no apparent reason at all, just setting in the cupboard.

After observing "seconds" for a while now, freezing, dropping, smashing on the ground etc, I may start selling "seconds". As, the "mistakes" don't bother me, the mistakes changing, evolving, or breaking into worse is
what bothers me. Substandard.

Though there is totally this "type" of pot that will evolve over the seasons, though, people may not have realized it yet! Hehehehe!

FFFV.

Sorce
 

penumbra

Masterpiece
Messages
2,428
Reaction score
2,612
Location
Front Royal, VA
USDA Zone
6
I have a number of pots that were epoxied back together and I simply put their best face forward and use them. One of my epoxied pots I repaired over 20 years ago and it has held up very well despite never having been out of the weather.
I meant to say out in the weather. It has been outside through freeze and thaw for over 20 years, probably closer to 30 years.
 

Forsoothe!

Masterpiece
Messages
3,652
Reaction score
4,182
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
6b
This sweet little Jade group is nicer than this photo in a Dale Cochoy pot that has a huge flaw that has no bearing on its viewing, -totally hidden on the bottom.
Jd2 2019_1228Bonsai0009.JPG
I was happy to buy the pot knowing that, as Mister Bondo, I could fix it up in a flash.
Jd2 20190219_131551.JPG
This is a firing problem and a pot in his estate inventory bought by Flower Market in Dundee, MI. He don't make 'em anymore.
 
Top Bottom