The Social Isolation Thread

Forsoothe!

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I’m on house arrest, so getting some things done. Moved a dwarf smokebush from nursery bucket to its first pot.
Mostly I’ve been bringing pots in a few at a time, cleaning up dead leaves and grooming the soil surface. Everybody is getting their first dose of systemic insecticide and organic fertilizer, and new surface dressing moss as needed.So far I’ve done fifteen azaleas, seven quince, with at least as many more to go. Plus a crab, two contorted hazels, a pearl bush, and one or two other oddballs. Then there’s the tropicals in the basement. What’s wrong with me?
You haven't infected anyone else or gone stir crazy. Good for you!
 

Carol 83

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I've been purging and cleaning all week. I did take a couple of minutes to take some cuttings from a cork bark jade I got from Stickroot. I have to get back to work Monday and tomorrow is supposed to be 70 and sunny, so I'm giving myself a day for fun. Maybe a couple of repots, if nothing else I'm going to sit on my patio and enjoy the sun. Be well everybody.
 

Wilson

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@CWTurner thanks my friend! One thing we can get cheap up here is cedar poles, so it struck me as the best way to incorporate a fence into my cedar hedge.
 

Forsoothe!

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Keeping body & soul together with the Breakfast of Champions: back-to-back gingerbread cookies buttered and homemade (and homegrown) kumquat marmalade, and chocolate chip cookies butter & marmalade, dipped in hazelnut favored coffee with Capt. Morgan. (You may have wondered why cookies all have flat backs? Now you know!)
20200326_101726.jpg
 

Carol 83

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So much for the weather forecast. The sun finally came out at 4:45 p.m. I did get an hour of patio time. Things are waking up in the garden, so that was cheerful to see.
 

AZbonsai

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You could greatly improve that base by layering it. Not hard to do. I did three last year.
Cape honeysuckle? Would you layer it right where it tapers? I've air layered but never honeysuckle. I have another I can experiment on.
 
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Just when I thought I was done with projects...I found this San Jose yesterday for a steal!!!

2-3 inch trunk and height under 18 inches. Water was pushing hard, so I just guy wired a few branches down. It will get completely wired during summer dormancy.
 

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River's Edge

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I hope everyone recognizes that air layering is a technique that is useful in certain circumstances, however it affects the longevity of the Bonsai. Frequently it causes long term issues with the trunk and overall health of the tree, shortening it's useful life as a Bonsai. Thus best to treat as a second best option, rather than a great way to create more Bonsai.
For this reason root grafting may be a better option in some cases. Producing cuttings to propagate may be better in the long run in some cases.
Not sure why but there is very little discussion of the long term effects of sawing off the trunk after air layering!
For example how long before rot sets in and affects the tree! Can you actually prevent this from happening?
I am just suggesting that it is important to understand the long term effects, not just the short term improvements.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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I hope everyone recognizes that air layering is a technique that is useful in certain circumstances, however it affects the longevity of the Bonsai. Frequently it causes long term issues with the trunk and overall health of the tree, shortening it's useful life as a Bonsai. Thus best to treat as a second best option, rather than a great way to create more Bonsai.
For this reason root grafting may be a better option in some cases. Producing cuttings to propagate may be better in the long run in some cases.
Not sure why but there is very little discussion of the long term effects of sawing off the trunk after air layering!
For example how long before rot sets in and affects the tree! Can you actually prevent this from happening?
I am just suggesting that it is important to understand the long term effects, not just the short term improvements.
Interesting point! I always wondered how people managed to get plants to callus over that part. I cuttings that's easy, it just happens. But with air layers, especially big ones, that seems to be a possible issue.
 

JudyB

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I hope everyone recognizes that air layering is a technique that is useful in certain circumstances, however it affects the longevity of the Bonsai. Frequently it causes long term issues with the trunk and overall health of the tree, shortening it's useful life as a Bonsai. Thus best to treat as a second best option, rather than a great way to create more Bonsai.
For this reason root grafting may be a better option in some cases. Producing cuttings to propagate may be better in the long run in some cases.
Not sure why but there is very little discussion of the long term effects of sawing off the trunk after air layering!
For example how long before rot sets in and affects the tree! Can you actually prevent this from happening?
I am just suggesting that it is important to understand the long term effects, not just the short term improvements.
I think for myself and for the most part, the part of the air layer that I'm after is the part above the site, not below. But we do lots of trunk reductions on our trees so not sure why it'd be so much different than that honestly, as long as the cut site has good aftercare, like any reduction site.
 

leatherback

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I have found that the cut area under the soil will close much faster than any above-ground cuts. POssibly due to the moist conditions, possibly due to better protection by the tree. So fas I still have to get layers to start rotting from the bottom..
 
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