Twin trunk cork bark elm - opinions ?

davetree

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This is a nice cork bark elm stock that I recently acquired from Telperion Farms. I am very happy with this elm, it has a nice base, thick bark, and subtle movement. I think I want to style this as a twin trunk, using the small trunk on the right. My concern is that the split is too high, but I have seen other cork elms done this way and they looked pretty good. There are other options for a single trunk tree, but I thought this might be the most interesting style. I can always take off the second trunk later and turn it into a shohin.Opinions are appreciated, what do you think ?

-sorry about the picture quality.
 

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John Ruger

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Would you consider clefting the trunk? But to be honest, it looks really good as is.

Real beauty you got, good luck and post on what you decide
 

Tachigi

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Dave, my two cents. If you like the idea of a twin trunk and your going by the letter of the law your screwed. However, if you like the mental image of twin trunk or a single trunk with a very low branch and can allow yourself some freedom from being bound...then go for it....I like your material and think you could have a very nice tree.
 

cbobgo

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As mentioned, it's a little high start for a by the books twin trunk, but I think it's a very pleasing image. The proportions of the two trunks look really nice. You just need to develop a new leader going up to the right on the smaller trunk and you are on your way.

- bob
 

Roberts

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Hi Dave,

Here's one I'm still working on, also has a high split and breaks lots of "rules", some I'm sure I don't even know of :D but I like playing with it anyway. Some %#$@* squirrels gnawed off some of the trunk base a couple yrs. ago:(. It was a bush when I got it and the right trunk/limb was as tall as the left.

Robert
 

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davetree

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Thanks for the opinions, guys. I know it is a little bit high on the trunk, but I am going to try anyway. I have seen some very nice trees where the first branch looks more like a tree than a branch, so that is my goal for now.
 

misfit11

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I agree. It may break "the rules" as far as traditional Japanese bonsai is concerned. But rules were made to be broken.:D I like the twin trunk you've got going on here. However, as stated previously, I question the necessity of the first left-hand branch. I think you may have a more pleasing design without it. Just my two cents.
 

jquast

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If you are concerned about the height of the split between the two trees then why not ground layer it at a more appropriate level. Nick the bark into the cambium in a few spots and bury the trunk, elms love to throw out new roots. Just dont prune the top if you decide to do this as this will be severing the energy needed to force new roots.
 

davetree

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Misfit - I haven't removed any branches yet, the tree is just settling in to its new home.

jquast - I could air-layer, but the base and roots are really nice for an elm. A really good nebari is there.
 

Bonsai Nut

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If you wanted a twin trunk, you could start to train it as such, and then at some point in the future do a ground layer to move the nebari up. Creating new nebari on elms can be accomplished in one or two years quite easily.
 

grog

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I think the second trunk fits very nice as a subtrunk, develop accordingly. I've always kinda scratched my head over the single heavy trunk thing as a natural representation of a tree, but that's due to growth habits of trees in this area and not aesthetics. It looks like you could develop that as a very proportionate subtrunk.
 

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