What the what...is it?

Cadillactaste

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I've been in the hobby five years...most all my trees shipped to me. This is the first for open windows into the box to see the tree. I was concerned when mail lady said there was dirt on her desk...so she kept the box beside her making sure it was upright. Peaked inside and was excited to get it home to check it. Though a bit unorthodox possibly...it shipped well. New growth seems happy and healthy and no foliage loose in box. Wrapped in plastic and substrate well protected. Just a but fell out the cracks. But...it mostly all arrived fine.

Very excited I made this purchase. What a quirky piece to have on the bench. ?
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baron

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I can believe your fascination for this one.. it's definitely very intresting!
Went looking for Black Olives on the google but I can't find anything remotely resembling this one.. I'm assuming the neagari were done on purpose?
Do you know anything of the history? I wonder how it came to be :D
 

Cadillactaste

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I can believe your fascination for this one.. it's definitely very intresting!
Went looking for Black Olives on the google but I can't find anything remotely resembling this one.. I'm assuming the neagari were done on purpose?
Do you know anything of the history? I wonder how it came to be :D
It was a section removed off a 30 year old tree. That is all I know of it...but, yes neagari was the intended purpose. This was told to me in correspondence after the purchase of the listing. When I asked of which Olive species it was. Which was not listed in auction.
 
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Looks like it is part of a trunk or big root planted upside down.
Cool tree, good luck with it!
 

rockm

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It was a section removed off a 30 year old tree. That is all I know of it...but, yes neagari was the intended purpose. This was told to me in correspondence after the purchase of the listing. When I asked of which Olive species it was. Which was not listed in auction.
You know that "Black olive" isn't an olive species right?
 
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You'll find out soon when the leaves will get a bit bigger if is olive or Bucida. Anyways, it still looks like it was planted upside down.
 

Cadillactaste

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You'll find out soon when the leaves will get a bit bigger if is olive or Bucida. Anyways, it still looks like it was planted upside down.
That's because it has no canopy ?. Exposed root or neagari is what those exposed roots you are seeing currently. Which might offer one the look of a tree planted upside down I reckon. If not familiar with the style.
 
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That's because it has no canopy ?. Exposed root or neagari is what those exposed roots you are seeing currently. Which might offer one the look of a tree planted upside down I reckon. If not familiar with the style.
Yes, I know what a neagari is. But I think what looks like exposed roots are in fact branches of a bush type plant that were planted in the ground.
Are there nodes on the "roots"? Real roots don't have nodes and don't grow so straight.
Also, looking at the upper part it's obvious it was in the ground before and it had roots coming from it. But you have the tree in front of you and you can see better than me.
 

Cadillactaste

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Yes, I know what a neagari is. But I think what looks like exposed roots are in fact branches of a bush type plant that were planted in the ground.
Are there nodes on the "roots"? Real roots don't have nodes and don't grow so straight.
Also, looking at the upper part it's obvious it was in the ground before and it had roots coming from it. But you have the tree in front of you and you can see better than me.
Trust me...that is not the case. There is a slight scar from it being severed from the base of the mother tree. It was always the root section of the base, they just made it into neagari. Which is why, it's just now budding out. ?
 

grouper52

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Thanks...I wish to keep with the quirkiness of the tree I believe. Been just looking at a lot of google images. Maybe @grouper52 has any suggestions? Of course it needs to just grow out to offer possibilities.
Sorry for the late reply- been away for a while, details too complicated/confusing to bother with.

My response to this "bonsai"??? "Man, you must be putting me on ..." It's really a bit too tame and traditional to spark much interest in me - a dime a dozen in my collection. And what in the world is that green stuff poking out on several of the more recent pictures - living tissue of something??? Sheesh!

God said to Abraham, "Kill me a son."
Abe said, "Man, you must be putting me on."
God said, "No."
Abe said, "What?!"
God said, "You can do what you want Abe, but, the next time you see me coming you'd better run."
And Abe said, "Well, where you want this killing done?"
And God said, "Out on Highway 61... "

(Dylan, in case you don't know.)
 
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Leo in N E Illinois

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Doesn't look like much green there, hope it lives. You are coming into winter, cool weather. It most likely is Bucida, if the seller said black olive. Which means it does not tolerate cool or cold very well. Growth will slow to a crawl or stop altogether if temps drop into the 40's.

Second, I would quarantine this freaky thing. Knots on roots like that are often pathogenic nematodes. They spread through soil and water splashing off the soil and down onto a neighboring pot. This problem could spread. I know of no pesticide that would kill the nematodes and leave the gall and tree alive. Incurable except by eradication (burning the galls & roots) and soil sterilization, either chemical (NaSCN or NH4SCN)) or thermal.

An alternate cause could be gall wasps, which would likely hatch out sometime in spring, and possibly attack your other trees. Here a systemic like Imidacloprid would kill the wasp larva if they are still feeding.

While it looks ''cool'' bringing likely diseased trees into ones collection requires additional precautions to prevent unintended spread of the problem. Not saying you should get rid of this, just offering that you should be careful with it. Allow not soil from it, to get into any other pot.

Plant virus are another issue, while I doubt this is a virus, I seldom bring ''variegated'' plants into my collection, especially variegated plants that are rather ''streaky'', as often these are plant viruses which can be spread by cutting tools and sap on human fingers. Bold, clean variegated patterns with sharp margins between colors are usually epigenetic mutations, and are not communicable, are not a virus. These are safe. But fine streaky variegation, especially accompanied by little spots of sunken tissue or necrosis are often virus.
 
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SizeXtraMedium

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Doesn't look like much green there, hope it lives. You are coming into winter, cool weather. It most likely is Bucida, if the seller said black olive. Which means it does not tolerate cool or cold very well. Growth will slow to a crawl or stop altogether if temps drop into the 40's.

Second, I would quarantine this freaky thing. Knots on roots like that are often pathogenic nematodes. They spread through soil and water splashing off the soil and down onto a neighboring pot. This problem could spread. I know of no pesticide that would kill the nematodes and leave the gall and tree alive. Incurable except by eradication (burning the galls & roots) and soil sterilization, either chemical (NaSCN or NH4SCN)) or thermal.

An alternate cause could be gall wasps, which would likely hatch out sometime in spring, and possibly attack your other trees. Here a systemic like Imidacloprid would kill the wasp larva if they are still feeding.

While it looks ''cool'' bringing likely diseased trees into ones collection requires additional precautions to prevent unintended spread of the problem. Not saying you should get rid of this, just offering that you should be careful with it. Allow not soil from it, to get into any other pot.

Plant virus are another issue, while I doubt this is a virus, I seldom bring ''variegated'' plants into my collection, especially variegated plants that are rather ''streaky'', as often these are plant viruses which can be spread by cutting tools and sap on human fingers. Bold, clean variegated patterns with sharp margins between colors are usually epigenetic mutations, and are not communicable, are not a virus. These are safe. But fine streaky variegation, especially accompanied by little spots of sunken tissue or necrosis are often virus.
I agree. Definitely diseased and dangerous. Wouldn't want it ruin your collection. Best send it to me up here in New Hampshire

;):p:p:D:D:cool:
 
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