What's your dream tree?

Brian Van Fleet

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Yes, this IS a tree from the north of Japan.

I live in the foothills of the north Georgia mountains. My climate is much like Japan’s. I do tend to get a bit of snow every winter. But, I do take measures to keep the tree as cool as possible. I shade it in the mid-day. I water both the soil and foliage with cold water from the hose. Twice a day.

I have been given care advice from Tyler Sherrard who worked with these trees in Japan, so I feel confident that it will be fine.

The nebari spread at the base is about 6 inches. The trunk caliper a couple inches up off the nebari is about 3 1/2 inches. I wouldn’t call that “massive”.

The bark is dark. I’d call it “black”. And it‘s very rugged and flaky and delicate.
The Japanese bonsai guys seem to be concerned with taxonomy than we tend to be.

Looking closer Adair, you could convince me yours is the ghlenni. I have only seen one other, and just a few jezoensis; which I do own.

You probably know it, but you have a special specimen on your hands, and it will be exciting to see it trained...as much as I
I don’t appreciate trees on slabs. Some say the oils in our hands damage their needles, and that they don’t take well to having branches moved around a bunch, so wear gloves and be decisive when you make bends. I never had any trouble with mine other than climate, and you’re good if you’re growing white pines.

glehnni, at Brussels in quarantine around 2011:
ADAC0C06-66DD-42F1-9C5D-E826344FFA06.jpeg
jezoensis, from Brent at Evergreen Gardenworks around 2014; I trust his taxonomy. I have cuttings from this growing.
31E7DA50-0777-4115-BBF2-9D0DCDB64368.jpeg
B4754F2E-E411-45AF-AB56-08277341760D.jpeg
 

Adair M

Pinus Envy
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The Japanese bonsai guys seem to be concerned with taxonomy than we tend to be.

Looking closer Adair, you could convince me yours is the ghlenni. I have only seen one other, and just a few jezoensis; which I do own.

You probably know it, but you have a special specimen on your hands, and it will be exciting to see it trained...as much as I
I don’t appreciate trees on slabs. Some say the oils in our hands damage their needles, and that they don’t take well to having branches moved around a bunch, so wear gloves and be decisive when you make bends. I never had any trouble with mine other than climate, and you’re good if you’re growing white pines.

glehnni, at Brussels in quarantine around 2011:
View attachment 321450
jezoensis, from Brent at Evergreen Gardenworks around 2014; I trust his taxonomy. I have cuttings from this growing.
View attachment 321448
View attachment 321449
Thanks, Brian. Yes, this is a special tree. I got it from Doug Paul. Tyler thinks it’s about 250 years old. As you can imagine, I baby This tree! It gets an umbrella, it’s own special place by the side of the koi pond, and wine with cheese and crackers every evening!

2F57A6EA-AF3F-4D90-8232-0754E4DFE431.jpeg

It’s not going to need any major bends, it’s already got it’s basic shape. Just some tidying up. It’s pretty unique in that it looks just as good from both sides. Either side could be the “front”. I’m going to try to keep it that way.

I now have several spruce: a Colorado Blue, several Norway spruce, three Red Spruce, and thus Ezo. This one has the smallest needles and delicate foliage. Two of the Red Spruce’s needles are almost as small, but they are about 1/2 inch. The Ezo is less than 1/2 inch. The Norway’s needles are about 3/4 inch, and the Colorado’s are about an inch long.
 

Brian Van Fleet

Pretty Fly for a Bonsai Guy
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Thanks, Brian. Yes, this is a special tree. I got it from Doug Paul. Tyler thinks it’s about 250 years old. As you can imagine, I baby This tree! It gets an umbrella, it’s own special place by the side of the koi pond, and wine with cheese and crackers every evening!
You know what’s funny, the ghlenni in my last post was one that Doug imported and was in quarantine at Brussel’s. Now look at the tree in the background to the left. That’s your spruce next to it!
953210DB-757D-4A39-B44F-33B5703198D9.jpeg
 

clem

Shohin
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This has probably been asked before, but if money was no object - what would your ultimate "dream tree" be?
I love a lot more great Bonsai, but those 3 are maybe my favorite all time ->
Ezo spruce 😍 ->
Picéa fabuleux.JPG




JWP with a very old looking bark 🥰 ->
pinus pentaphylla5.jpg


Famous JWP owned by Kobayashi now (i prefer the look it had on this ancient pic) 😍 ->
pinus pentaphylla8.jpg
 

Boscology

Mame
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The tree I would wish for is a large Bristlecone Pine like the one in my Avatar. I think it would be cool to have a bonsai thats thousands of years older than ancient Greece, Egypt, or Jesus.
 

Potawatomi13

Masterpiece
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I have a few really nice yamadori Pacific Yew that I have located and been dreaming of them on my bench. I have collected a few small yew, but haven't found the cahones to tackle these bigger specimens. In the dreams I always have help collecting. Lol! Dream on!
When would you collect?
 

RKatzin

Chumono
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When would you collect?
In spring, April or May depending on the weather. We're over 3000' and spring is, changeable, chancey, helter skelter. I've seen 100F in May and snow in June up here.
Right now we can get anywhere we want. Good time for locating trees and some preliminary clearing and such. Come spring access is limited, wash outs and snowbound roads, blown down trees, the usual springtime mess in the mountains.
I also have Vine maples and azalea and crabapples to collect at the same time. If you come down here you'll go home with something.
 

Adair M

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But it would be cool though!
Oh, absolutely! They tend to drop branches, and they like to turn themselves into forests by sending out “daughter” trees off the roots. If you made a huge forest planting, and lived at the appropriate elevation, you might have something.
 

Trenthany

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Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia). Partly because it doesn't like it here and partly because I enjoy saying the name. View attachment 320958This one belongs to Wolfgang Putz.
Waaaait you can bonsai this stuff? I need to look up collecting it because there is metric tons of it here! Lol
 

JoeR

Masterpiece
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😯😯😯
 
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