2017 Last purchase tree(s)

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Houston TX
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8b
#23
@Brian Van Fleet-
Good to see that Beech is getting on the radar more and more. They are beautiful trees, and if they are a little bit more demanding in culture they are certainly worth it.
Here is my Kurume Azalea, last tree of the year for me...
et View attachment 172438 View attachment 172439 View attachment 172440 View attachment 172442
With this caliber, I don't think one can have too many trees in a year!
 
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Ohio
USDA Zone
6
#28
I just ordered 100 JBP seads for the contest:) Just under the wire LOL
 
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Location
God’s Country (North Florida)
USDA Zone
8b
#29
1643EC0A-64B8-45EF-9D98-CEEA165EA2FD.jpeg 9E5FED79-731A-43CB-9D19-C9E59F29427B.jpeg

Found this dwarf black olive to replace the one I lost this past summer when the idiot pool guy chummed our filter and shut the wrong gang valve off (the one to my bonsai drip irrigation system) after he used the hose. Trees went without water for 10 days in 95 degree sun while we were on vacation and I lost 35 of my 40 trees.....

Anyway, I have 4 options to use as a top branch. The branch to the far left in the 2nd photo will likely get lopped off regardless of which of the 4 branches to the right I ultimately select for the top. I’m leaning towards using the branch furthest to the right, 1/2 thick now and I think will create a nice ultimate trunk taper from the base to the top. The two branches on the left (both are 1” thick - One is kind of dark in the photo) seem too thick to create a good taper and/or a treecthst is too tall; the thin branch is too thin to my way of thinking. All branches except the thin one have many offshoots that can be wired downward into side branches for a nice beginning to a top canopy.

Which branch would you use for the top? Thoughts?
 

JudyB

Queen of the Nuts
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South East of Cols. OH
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5
#30
Wow that's a horrible story, hard to imagine coming home to that!

Well since you asked... I would chop the tree just above the lower sets of branches. There is little taper and movement above that, and a long blank spot as well. I know that's not what you're looking for, but would be a better tree in the long term if you did.
 
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God’s Country (North Florida)
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8b
#32
Wow that's a horrible story, hard to imagine coming home to that!

Well since you asked... I would chop the tree just above the lower sets of branches. There is little taper and movement above that, and a long blank spot as well. I know that's not what you're looking for, but would be a better tree in the long term if you did.
Thanks for your input Judy. Not sure that cutting it below the top branches would solve the obvious problem that there is an absence of branching midway up on the left side. However, there is a branch on the back side that I can wire to the left so as to fill in that void in the middle plus there are two buds that have sprouted above the bottom left branch, about 2" up, that will hopefully develop into a suitable side branch to fill that void. As for movement, the trunk is fairly upright and straight so I am leaning strongly towards styling this as a formal upright. the 1/2" branch that I am thinking of using continues that trunk direction. Does this change your opinion?
 
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54
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68
Location
Princeton Oregon (ish)
USDA Zone
6a
#33
I ordered my last tree in December but it won't be shipped tell tomorrow 1/2/18. The ever seemingly unpopular incense cedar. The tree/shrub I got right after Christmas is a total experiment, Rhamnus Frangula
I don't know if I'll be able to turn it into anything but who cares I'll love them just the same.
 

JudyB

Queen of the Nuts
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#34
Thanks for your input Judy. Not sure that cutting it below the top branches would solve the obvious problem that there is an absence of branching midway up on the left side. However, there is a branch on the back side that I can wire to the left so as to fill in that void in the middle plus there are two buds that have sprouted above the bottom left branch, about 2" up, that will hopefully develop into a suitable side branch to fill that void. As for movement, the trunk is fairly upright and straight so I am leaning strongly towards styling this as a formal upright. the 1/2" branch that I am thinking of using continues that trunk direction. Does this change your opinion?
I was actually talking about going just above the lowest set of branches to do the chop. But if you want informal or formal upright that won't work so well, I was thinking of a broom from that cut. Take a quick look at my olive thread and you can see how I went from something similar to yours to where it is now. Not saying that you should do this, merely pointing out an optional route. Formal uprights are generally stick straight, so this may not work for that style if you use a side branch for continuation of the trunk. You could go for informal upright and do that.
https://bonsainut.com/threads/help-needed-with-eu-olive-styling.7016/
 

CasAH

Chumono
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Arlington Heights, IL
USDA Zone
5
#35
I ordered my last tree in December but it won't be shipped tell tomorrow 1/2/18. The ever seemingly unpopular incense cedar. The tree/shrub I got right after Christmas is a total experiment, Rhamnus Frangula
I don't know if I'll be able to turn it into anything but who cares I'll love them just the same.
The best treatment for Rhamnus franglais is to chop and treat with 20% gallon 3A. It is considered an invasive species in Illinois, I have been killing them for close to 30 years now.
 
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495
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345
Location
Alabama
USDA Zone
8
#36
Messages
54
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68
Location
Princeton Oregon (ish)
USDA Zone
6a
#37
The best treatment for Rhamnus franglais is to chop and treat with 20% gallon 3A. It is considered an invasive species in Illinois, I have been killing them for close to 30 years now.
Yeah, they are an invasive species but because of that they are extremely hardy and cheap ;) technically Junipers are an invasive species around here and people love them as Bonsai haha (yes not necessarily the same species of Juniper)
 

miker

Chumono
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Location
Wyomissing, PA
USDA Zone
6b
#38
Wow that's a horrible story, hard to imagine coming home to that!

Well since you asked... I would chop the tree just above the lower sets of branches. There is little taper and movement above that, and a long blank spot as well. I know that's not what you're looking for, but would be a better tree in the long term if you did.
Agreed.^^^ I really enjoyed working with this species in Florida, it is a natural choice for bonsai.

As you probably know, Molivella, this species is tropical and is sensitive to freezing temperatures, so it will need a setup indoors for a while in North Florida.
 
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21
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12
Location
God’s Country (North Florida)
USDA Zone
8b
#39
I was actually talking about going just above the lowest set of branches to do the chop. But if you want informal or formal upright that won't work so well, I was thinking of a broom from that cut. Take a quick look at my olive thread and you can see how I went from something similar to yours to where it is now. Not saying that you should do this, merely pointing out an optional route. Formal uprights are generally stick straight, so this may not work for that style if you use a side branch for continuation of the trunk. You could go for informal upright and do that.
https://bonsainut.com/threads/help-needed-with-eu-olive-styling.7016/
OK, I now understand what you suggested. Never crossed my mind to chop that low. You’ve given me something else to consider. Thank you.

Last but not least, while I said formal upright in reality you’re right, it would be more of an informal upright if I go with one of the top branches as a top.
 
Messages
21
Likes
12
Location
God’s Country (North Florida)
USDA Zone
8b
#40
Agreed.^^^ I really enjoyed working with this species in Florida, it is a natural choice for bonsai.

As you probably know, Molivella, this species is tropical and is sensitive to freezing temperatures, so it will need a setup indoors for a while in North Florida.
Agreed.^^^ I really enjoyed working with this species in Florida, it is a natural choice for bonsai.

As you probably know, Molivella, this species is tropical and is sensitive to freezing temperatures, so it will need a setup indoors for a while in North Florida.
I have several tropicals - several ficus, a schefflera, a few bougainvilleas, etc. As soon as we have weather (like now) that even begins to approach 40 degrees, they all go in the greenhouse until April.

24302429_1587392007986299_347226160588698021_o.jpg

@JudyB The two ficus on the left (one is cut off) are survivors of the Pool Filter Massacre and have gradually started to come back from almost no foliation after the idiot pool guy killed 35 of my 40+ trees. The ficus on the right is a recent acquisition that I picked up from Jim Smith's son in Vero Beach FL. If you know tropical bonsai, you may have heard of Jim Smith as a renowned bonsai master who specialized in tropicals. He passed away a year or so ago and I was thrilled to be able to nab a tree from his pre-bonsai stock for future styling/work.

24302429_1587392007986299_347226160588698021_o.jpg

The bougainvillea below is another victim of the Pool Filter Massacre but has also begun to show signs of life after having lost virtually all of its leaves.

24837534_1587392011319632_2824680949786487296_o.jpg
 

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