A slightly different design for growing boxes

Bonsai Nut

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Call me a simpleton, but sometimes I see a design that is so obvious I wonder "now why haven't I been doing that?". In this case, cutting legs into my grow boxes. Here's a self-explanatory photo for what I am talking about. Much nicer than rocks/bricks/small kids toys that I currently use to prop up my boxes :)

 
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Sweet! Now extend the right and left side upward into arches with handles cut in and you'll have the perfect grow box!


Will
 

Rick Moquin

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Lovely and practical indeed Greg. I have gone away from them in preference to the Vance patent because of our wet climate here in Nova Scotia, the wood retained far too much moisture for my growing conditions at the detriment of my trees.

Great idea Will with one draw back though, the eventual separation of the handle from the box when carying it.
 

Bonsai Nut

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Sweet! Now extend the right and left side upward into arches with handles cut in and you'll have the perfect grow box!
If I skip the handles I can mass-produce these guys with some 1"x6" stock and a template on a router table for the legs. I wouldn't need more than 1" or so for the legs just to elevate the whole thing and allow air to get underneath.
 

Graydon

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If I skip the handles I can mass-produce these guys with some 1"x6" stock and a template on a router table for the legs. I wouldn't need more than 1" or so for the legs just to elevate the whole thing and allow air to get underneath.

Well um... sure. You could take the time needed to make a router jig. The time to rough cut the parts to the template (1/4" large give or take based on your pattern bit size) on a band saw or jig saw. Then take the time to rout them. Or you could save all that time and do what Will suggested on another thread and glue blocks to the bottom. Use a type 3 exterior wood glue or gorilla glue. Back it up with a nail if you like. Added benefit is the block will be face grain down in the water and will absorb less moisture than the end or side grain as in your photo. It will not be susceptible to breaking off at the grain where the cutout turns up either.

My time is worth something. I'm guessing yours is as well. Save your time and go for gluing on the blocks to the bottom of your 1x6 carcasses.

Just my 2 cents as a woodworker.
 

Bonsai Nut

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Just my 2 cents as a woodworker.
That's what I get for having all the experts on this site :) I'll have to send a note to that guy in Japan and tell him cut-out legs on your planter boxes is soooooo 1990. :)
 

JasonG

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On my own grow boxes that are going to be heavy I will screw a 2x4 on each side of the bottom to allow for my hands to get under for lifting purposes.

On Med. sized trees I set the box right on the ground. For a collected tree this works good as the roots grow through the drain holes and into the bark dust. In a few months when you lift the box you can see the new roots and know the tree is growing roots like crazy....

Just my 2cents..... :)
 
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Graydon,

Thanks for reminding us that sometimes the simpliest solution is also the best solution. Although, I still have to admit, the cut in legs look very sweet. I never thought of the grain or the water asorbing capibilities of end grain.


Thanks,


Will
 

Rick Moquin

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Graydon,

Thanks for reminding us that sometimes the simpliest solution is also the best solution. Although, I still have to admit, the cut in legs look very sweet.
Yes they do indeed.

I never thought of the grain or the water asorbing capibilities of end grain.


Thanks,


Will
The end grain will not be sitting in water, the side grain perhaps, but IMO as a woodworker not much different than face grain. However I will support that the legs are fragile and could brake off at the grain growth lines. Having the grain lines running perpendicular is a better choice, but now, you are exposing the end grain to water. Outside of the feet being fragile, not much difference than screwing a block in the corners.
 

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