Artistic Jasper display

BonsaiWes

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This is pretty interesting KC. I don't think the over sprayed slab adds anything to the stone though, what I like about a suibian or dai is it adds to the natural image a stone creates in our head. Here I loose all sense of nature and only think of the weird modern art examples I have seen and didn't like so much. If the colors used on the slab were darker, a grey slate color maybe I think I would feel better about this. Was the stone painted?
 
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No, the slab was painted with hues echoing the stone. Of course it is modern art. The play of colors was what attracted me.
 

cbobgo

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strange. not un-appealing, but certainly doesn't gell with the normal way of displaying stones.

I'm kinda with wes - if the stone does not suggest some real life image, then it's just a pretty rock. This stone could look like a mountain - a volcano, even. But the dispaly doesn't promote that image.

- bob
 

BonsaiWes

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I had a chance to talk about the artist and look at some of his other work with a forum member. We came up with some great analogies and this also gave me some more time to really form an opinion, as a viewing stone or suiseki piece I honestly don't like it at all. The nature is missing, I would much prefer the stone on a darker slab like the grey slate looking undertone of the current one or even a suibian or dai would be better, something to tie it to the earth. The color scheme alone of the stone is what makes the piece different in my eyes, so why does the way it is displayed have to be as well? This is all to do with taste but the way it is done now is overkill, just if the artist found a way to be more subtle with the message.. .
 
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Smoke

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Here is a composition from the same artist with a different stone, backdrop and paduak wood with a swash of paint.
Al
 

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hmmmmmmmmm........ I find myself wishing the plank was a more random shape... not a dark color persay... and the stone more seated. If I were to have a stone that reminds me of a mountain peak at the crack of dawn when it is bathed in orange, pinks, and grays... and I wanted it on a wide base... I would have personally found a way to make the base seem more like a cloud (softer random shape)... not specific of course, but something to lead the mind... and painted it to look like the mountain peak was poking through the cloud ceiling.... If I were going for some non-traditional feel/look.... However I am a little too traditional for that sort of thing... :D

However it was thought provoking, and the second one Al showed, even more so... I liked that one for some reason very well. Without being right on the money... this photo I shot the other day illustrates my thought.

Kindest regards,

Victrinia
 

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I have to say I really like the first one. I saw what Ms (Mrs? I never get those right!) Ensor saw, and I agree that the stone would look better if it was better seated. If I had a tree that matched the stone (or the other way around) I would happily display them together, although untraditional.
 
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Well, there's a reason I didn't call this suiseki. This is modern art using found objects, in this case stone. I'm not an avid suiseki fan, although I do appreciate mountain stones. However, I like this piece and am glad it was included in Bay Island Bonsai's Exhibit of Fine Bonsai.
 
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"Well, there's a reason I didn't call this suiseki. This is modern art using found objects, in this case stone. I'm not an avid suiseki fan, although I do appreciate mountain stones. However, I like this piece and am glad it was included in Bay Island Bonsai's Exhibit of Fine Bonsai."

I don't see why there has to be a contradiction between "modern art" and Suiseki. In a sense all suiseki are found objects...Could it not be "modern suiseki"?
 

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