Freshly collected White Pine

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I usually do not mess with the white pines I see in the woods, as most are as straight as a bean pole and whorled to no end. However, a couple years ago, I found a white pine that was slanting across a deer trail, the trunk grew along the ground for a foot or so and then angled upwards. I hacked it back to the first branch and servered the roots on one side. Last year I servered the roots on the other side.

Yesterday I was walking through the woods, doing some thinking, and decided to collect this tree. The "front" of the tree has natural shari and the branch I left filled out quite nicely. The guy in the pictures is a fellow bonsaist, Ted Kotynia who helped me pot this pine up in a oversized and deep bonsai pot when I came home. Like all my collected trees, this one will not see a bonsai pot in porportion for a few years, no sense slowing down growth and ramification now.

Pinus Strobus The second picture shows about the angle I potted it at
 

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HotAction

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Will, Looks like that was one EWP worth messin' with. I love the soft folliage, and with the size of that tree I think it could make a very lovely image. I have found it hard to find any good advice on these species, One fella out of Toronto (i think) wrote an article and he swears by em. After that it seems everyone says @#$% it. Do you have an approach as far as candling and bud management is concerned?

-Dave
 

TheSteve

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Looks like it could be a winner. Good that you were able to work on it over time instead of all at once.
 

greerhw

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To me that would be a fork lift tree. The pot could cost all of your incentive check.
I would like to see it wired and in a pot.....

Ciao,
Harry
 
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Will, Looks like that was one EWP worth messin' with. I love the soft folliage, and with the size of that tree I think it could make a very lovely image. I have found it hard to find any good advice on these species, One fella out of Toronto (i think) wrote an article and he swears by em. After that it seems everyone says @#$% it. Do you have an approach as far as candling and bud management is concerned?


That would be Jerry Vlcek, you can see some of his white pies at http://torontobonsai.org/Archives/techniques/white.pine/whitepine.htm

I have a few in the ground at the cabin that I have keep small and compact by typical candle pinching, but have failed to get any back budding on needle-less wood. They whorl and swell naturally, so they are a challenge, but Jerry gives some good advice.

I agree, the size of this is it's saving grace, anything smaller with this species and the needles become over powering.


Will
 
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That would be Jerry Vlcek, you can see some of his white pies at http://torontobonsai.org/Archives/techniques/white.pine/whitepine.htm

I have a few in the ground at the cabin that I have keep small and compact by typical candle pinching, but have failed to get any back budding on needle-less wood. They whorl and swell naturally, so they are a challenge, but Jerry gives some good advice.

I agree, the size of this is it's saving grace, anything smaller with this species and the needles become over powering.


Will

Thanks for that great link! I collected a couple of EWPs from the Xmas tree farm this year, the deer wouldn't leave them alone and then the bush hog got them, so they have thickish trunks and are very short. I hadn't any reason to think they'd make good bonsai, but with this information I may be guardedly optimistic.

Good luck with your collected monster.

Chris
 

emorrin

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Thanks for sharing that article. The Pinus Strobus is one of the most common native pines where I live in Illinois. I remember reading that they the needles do not reduce well so I have never really bothered with them. I like shohin sized trees and the needle length is too long for such a size. I have never messed with 5 needle pines but plan on in the future once I get the 2 needle variety techniques down. (one of these years. :eek:).
 

HotAction

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Will, have you picked up any tips or tricks throughout this growing season?

-Dave
 
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Not really, as I have basically left this one alone this year to recover from the collection. Ii threw me a curve when some needles started to brown, but then it responded by pushing new buds. Looks like everything is going to be fine.



Will
 

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