Input needed on Pine Styling.

JasonG

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In light of all the recent train wrecks on here lets see what an actual tree question or posting will do, lol!!

Here is a ponderosa I collected last year.... I am a year away from working on it, but it is very healthy and could be worked on now if I wanted too. I know what I am going to do to it but wanted to see what everyone else is thinking so that we can divert our attention away from the lameness that seems to be going around and lets look at trees.

Tree has about a 3-1/2 to 4" trunk and is about 2' tall.... fire away with virts, ideas, thoughts, etc....and lets see if we are thinking along the same lines. Its a farily simple tree.



Thanks, Jason
 

TheSteve

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I can't remember this tree for certain. Does the dead wood go up the back side of the trunk or stop where we see it in the picture? If you've got a clear line of sight for a big bend, I'd bring it back upright and make a nice literati out of it.
 

Daysleeper

Sapling
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The twisting trunk is great but the needles are longer than the trunk is thick. I see this in most pines and it ruins the illusion for me. Also, is that a lare slug on your fence ;0
 

TheSteve

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I believe he mentioned it was just (last year) collected and hasn't had any work yet. Instead of pointing out nature's flaws, I'm thinking he wanted to know what you would do if you owned it.
 

JasonG

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I can't remember this tree for certain. Does the dead wood go up the back side of the trunk or stop where we see it in the picture? If you've got a clear line of sight for a big bend, I'd bring it back upright and make a nice literati out of it.
Yeah the live vein spins around the trunk and deadwood. I don't think literati would be the best use of this tree.....it just doesn't lend itself to that. Next time you are over we will look at it.

The twisting trunk is great but the needles are longer than the trunk is thick. I see this in most pines and it ruins the illusion for me. Also, is that a lare slug on your fence ;0
The needle length is good on this tree and isn't longer than the trunk is thick. Ponderosa needles vary quite a bit in length, it all depends on where they were collected and the growing conditions. I have shohin ponderosa with needles under an inch, naturally with no input from me to reduce them. Ponderosa are also like all other pines in that they will reduce quite a bit. Simple things like water intake, knowing when to fertilize and when not to and of course needle and candle work.

I posted this to see what you would do to it.....or we can start a flame war, lol!! No slug on the fence...I think that is a mud hut for some flying critter.

Thanks, Jason
 
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This is a great piece Jason which offers a few possibilities. Could you share a couple other views with us please?



Will
 

crhabq

Mame
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my 2csJune2009075.jpg
fan out that foliage and jin as you please.
first time I've tried to include a pic in a post, please excuse the poor quality
 

Daysleeper

Sapling
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Was not meaning to start a flame war. I like the tree an my observation was wrong due to perspective. After my stroke, It's been hard to deal with perspectives. I'm not even qualified to say what I'd do with it. It evokes a powerful image already and I'd be scared to mess with it if i had something that good lol.
 

Rick Moquin

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This is difficult to deal with from just one shot, not having: a) seen the tree in person; and b) not offered different perspective albeit two dimensionally of this tree.

So I'll go with what I see. Bring the foliage from the right back towards the trunk under that sharp bend, but on it's present plane. A literati in this tree is a waste of tree.

Solid backgrounds make for easier virts.
 

irene_b

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I am thinking that this tree needs the warmth of Texas....Will PM you my address for shipping....
Irene
 

rockm

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This is a great tree to begin with.

I'm pretty conservative in design with stuff I've never worked with. Don't know exactly what's possible with drastically "reshaping" a Ponderosa trunk. With that in mind, here's what I'd do--Increase the trunk's angle to the right. Square semi cascade pot. Wire foliage out with an eye to a future longish plane-a semi-cascade of sorts that rambles to the right a bit.
 

grog

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If the descending branch still has some flex to it (hard to tell how thick it is) I'd try to crank it back upwards right around the same spot as the dead stub comes off the back. Better yet if you could get a twist to it and rotate it away from the current front as it's being brought upwards. I think that would complement the movement of the trunk and deadwood nicely.
 

amkhalid

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Jay, this tree has an incredibly stunning trunk. I can't wait to see what you do with it.

Like Rockm, I'm hesitant to submit my suggestions due to a lack of familiarity with this species. But what the hell, you asked for it lol.

Like others have suggested, I would consider trying to crank up that first branch. I think this would be possible with most resinous species with the right technique.

Ultimately, I think some sort of slanting thing might be nice in the long run, as shown in my silly MSPaint cartoon :p

Can you let us in on your plans? :D
 

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irene_b

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OK crappy virt time..
I know you can bend the snot out of a Ponderosa :D
I would finish what nature started and twist the branch at #1-4 as marked on the virt. plus move it over a bit.
Irene
 
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tom tynan

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Hey Jason...It is hard to tell without a top or side view - but the tendency would be to pull up the main descending branch. As you know the point where the twisting shari stops at the very top of the tree - the last twist that is - will split very easily in this zone because of the shari. The tree right now as raw material is very cool - but you will have to find a way to make it less symmetrical - that is,.... less of an upside down "^". That main trunk with the multiple twists - is like an iron bar - meaning it is incredibly strong and other than changing the angle - it stays. For me - this one is all about creating and shaping the best possible crown to complement the twisted trunk. With all of the empty space between the twisted trunk and the foliage - I might think about the best place for a strong back branch - to really give some depth. Getting some good separation between the foliage masses will help as well. I recall this one is at least one year from collection ? If so - given your climate - the needle length is very reasonable. Good luck with this one - it will make a nice addition to your collection....Tom
 

shohin kid

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Like others have suggested, I would consider trying to crank up that first branch. I think this would be possible with most resinous species with the right technique.

Ultimately, I think some sort of slanting thing might be nice in the long run, as shown in my silly MSPaint cartoon
I like amkhalid's virt if you can replicate it.
 

wvbonsai

Sapling
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Do you think that when these shoots grow/develop you can force some back budding? I know cascade is pretty obvious but with that twisting trunk and some development of the shoots identified it would make a pretty interesting bunjin as well.
 

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amkhalid

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Do you think that when these shoots grow/develop you can force some back budding? I know cascade is pretty obvious but with that twisting trunk and some development of the shoots identified it would make a pretty interesting bunjin as well.
Hey wvbonsai, I don't think the shoots you circled are growing from the trunk... they seem to be some wayward shoots from the foliage down below
 

anttal63

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jason as alway's, very nice material. the tree speaks volumes already. if it were mine i would just leave it in this position and organise the foliage into a nice open pad / pads.
 
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