reciprocating saw or chainsaw??

BobbyLane

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Sandev is using a cordless reciprocating saw here, i guess it makes it an easier task, that bosch looks pretty handy. more stuff to carry though

often i see collectors only taking small hand saws and a set of loppers to cut roots and limbs.
 

Trenthany

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ive rarely seen powersaws used on collecting trips🤔
Oddd everyone I’ve talked to about cypress except in to deep of water uses them. Maybe it’s only common in non rocky areas?
 

Trenthany

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I use an oscillating multi-tool with a coarse blade for my Niwaki and even larger bonsai. Makes very accurate cuts without much vibration in tight areas and will cut a fairly large branch or trunk. I had one for years before I discovered that it is incredibly useful for pruning.
For collecting? What kind of reach does your tool have? Mine has about three inches of I recall. Unless you have a saw attachment for it?
 

BobbyLane

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Oddd everyone I’ve talked to about cypress except in to deep of water uses them. Maybe it’s only common in non rocky areas?
im no expert, but this is what one yamadori collector said he carried on trips up into rocky, stony and hilly areas in the UK " pick, loppers, folding saw, axe and crowbar, but I never pack a spade"
 

Trenthany

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im no expert, but this is what one yamadori collector said he carried on trips up into rocky, stony and hilly areas in the UK " pick, loppers, folding saw, axe and crowbar, but I never pack a spade"
In rocky areas that sounds like a good kit. When you’ve got muck, dirt and roots spread through yards of the soil you’ve got a different experience in collecting. If I was collecting from a limestone ledge, or embedded in the walls of an abandoned house I’d bring different things than if I was collecting from a swamp.
 

BobbyLane

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In rocky areas that sounds like a good kit. When you’ve got muck, dirt and roots spread through yards of the soil you’ve got a different experience in collecting. If I was collecting from a limestone ledge, or embedded in the walls of an abandoned house I’d bring different things than if I was collecting from a swamp.
makes sense
 

bunjin

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For collecting? What kind of reach does your tool have? Mine has about three inches of I recall. Unless you have a saw attachment for it?
It would replace smaller pruning saws but not a chainsaw, and if you mean depth of cut, yes about 2-3". Here is an example of one with the wide blade that I use on my trees: https://www.amazon.com/WORKPRO-Osci...s=multitool+oscillating&qid=1596305921&sr=8-6 The ability to cut with one hand at any angle and very quickly is why I find it so useful. Very safe to use compared to a Sawzall. Battery life could be an issue for field use.
 

Trenthany

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What is up with all these ancient threads coming back up!?
My fault again! They aren’t all my fault though. I just wanted to find out about the only recommend blade I’ve found so far.
 

Ohmy222

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I use a silky folding saw. They are so good they are almost as fast as a reciprocating saw. I have a big one called a zubat and a smaller one called the pocket boy. Pocket boy is my go to. Highly recommended
 

wireme

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It would replace smaller pruning saws but not a chainsaw, and if you mean depth of cut, yes about 2-3". Here is an example of one with the wide blade that I use on my trees: https://www.amazon.com/WORKPRO-Osci...s=multitool+oscillating&qid=1596305921&sr=8-6 The ability to cut with one hand at any angle and very quickly is why I find it so useful. Very safe to use compared to a Sawzall. Battery life could be an issue for field use.
I have one as well, a dewalt. Never taken it collecting but it is a very, very good tool when it comes time to reduce large roots after recovery. I worked lots of trees before I had that tool but now I would hate to tackle a large yamadori repot without it, now that I know better I mean. Hands down way better than recip saw or hand saw for that kind of job.
 

leatherback

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It would replace smaller pruning saws but not a chainsaw, and if you mean depth of cut, yes about 2-3". Here is an example of one with the wide blade that I use on my trees: https://www.amazon.com/WORKPRO-Osci...s=multitool+oscillating&qid=1596305921&sr=8-6 The ability to cut with one hand at any angle and very quickly is why I find it so useful. Very safe to use compared to a Sawzall. Battery life could be an issue for field use.
Oh, these are great. I used them to shorten the doorframes when we bought our house and wanted to install thicker floorboards!
 

Trenthany

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Why not use perfectly good thread instead of make new one🧐?
Exactly! Lmao. Get yelled at for creating duplicate threads. Get yelled at for playing Jesus and pulling a Lazarus. I will create slightly old threads and resurrect them regularly so this doesn’t happen in the future. Roflmao. All kidding aside I just wanted to ask @Vin about the Spyder blades he recommended and if they’re really worth 3 times the price. Probably not but maybe they hold up exceptionally well.
 
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Woocash

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These are handy for tight spots


if you can get one of the loops under an awkward root you’re laughing.[/URL]
 

Maros

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These are handy for tight spots


if you can get one of the loops under an awkward root you’re laughing.[/URL]
I use this kind. Works wonders if root job gets hardcore.
 

Trenthany

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These are handy for tight spots


if you can get one of the loops under an awkward root you’re laughing.[/URL]
Definitely useful! I’m gonna get me one of these!
 

Vin

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You’re the only person I’ve seen recommend these. Do you like them better than the diablo/Bosch ones? I recently found them and they’re 3x the price. But if they hold up in dirt they’d be worth it.
I wouldn't say they hold up very well at all. Anytime your jamming a saw blade into dirt it's not going to cut well for long. I haven't collected for a few years but when I did, my recip saw with a spyder bore blade was quite handy.
 
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