Strange Insect on my Juniper Leaves

chumpplays

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Hello everyone!
I just bought my second procumbent nana the other day and upon getting it home I noticed a few of these beetle like creatures crawling around the foliage. I counted about four of them. they don't seem to run or even hide and can be easily picked off. any idea what these are and if I should be concerned?
 

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sorce

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Might be a borer.

Welcome to Crazy!

Sorce
 

StarGazer

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Hi @chumpplays,

To me it looks like a larch ladybug (aphidecta obliterata) but it is hard to tell from the picture, the beetle is so small that it is slightly out of focus. Borers have a different shape (generally flattened) that allows them to easily bore.

Different ladybug species can, and are often used to treat aphids organically, as these insects feed on them. It is possible it was used as biocontrol for your tree and other trees in the nursery where you got your juniper.

Are you in Europe by any chance? They are more common there although they have been introduced here in the US. Updating your profile location can help for more precise advice to your questions.

I would not apply pesticides until you identify these insects, you may end up eliminating a beneficial insect for your trees and garden, and less toxins in the environment are always better.

If you upload one or two more pictures, including one with the beetle on its back, it may be easier to identify this particular insect.
 
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chumpplays

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Hi @chumpplays,

To me it looks like a larch ladybug (aphidecta obliteraae) but it is hard to tell from the picture, the beetle is so small that it is slightly out of focus. Borers have a different shape (generally flattened) that allows them to easily bore.

Different ladybug species can, and are often used to treat aphids organically, as these insects feed on them. It is possible it was used as biocontrol for your tree and other trees in the nursery where you got your juniper.

Are you in Europe by any chance? They are more common there although they have been introduced here in the US. Updating your profile location can help for more precise advice to your questions.

I would not apply pesticides until you identify these insects, you may end up eliminating a beneficial insect for your trees and garden, and less toxins in the environment are always better.

If you upload one or two more pictures, including one with the beetle on its back, it may be easier to identify this particular insect.
Thanks for the thorough reply!

No not in Europe, I'm in Southern California actually and I'll go ahead and update my profile right now. I had thought it might've been some kind of lady bug as well but wasn't sure.

These are the only picture I could get that were clear.
 

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TN_Jim

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looks family chrysomelidae, probably some sort of leaf beetle, more than likely pretty harmless..?

check this one:
 

sorce

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Aye. Looks like a squash/cucumber/pumpkin beetle.

Sorce
 

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